Daniel Alfredsson

Alfredsson expects anger from Sens fans, ‘as there definitely should be’


Say this about Daniel Alfredsson — he’s honest.

The longtime captain and face of the Senators franchise signed with Detroit today on a one-year, $5.5 million deal — and, in speaking with the media, acknowledged his desire to win a Cup elsewhere will probably rile up Ottawa fans.

“I’m not worried about my legacy,” Alfredsson explained. “I expect there will be resentment and anger from fans, as I think there definitely should be.”

Ottawa’s sixth-round selection at the 1994 NHL Entry Draft, Alfie debuted with the club in 95-96 and went on to win the Calder Trophy and represent the team at the annual All-Star Game.

From there, the accolades continued to pour in: In 1999, he was named team captain; in 2006 he was named to the NHL’s second All-Star Team; in 2012 he won the King Clancy Memorial trophy and this year, captured the Mark Messier Leadership Award.

But after 18 seasons in the Canadian capital, it’s clear Alfredsson felt he needed a change.

First, there was his odd “probably not” comment when asked if Ottawa could come back from a 3-1 series deficit against Pittsburgh.

More recently, it was revealed Sens owner Eugene Melnyk is “feeling less flush than he used to,” (according to the Ottawa Citizen), and the team was reportedly working with a $50 million internal salary cap for next season, $14 million below the ceiling.

Not exactly what you’d expect from a Stanley Cup contender.

As such, it’s easier to understand why Alfie said the following:


It was a candid and frank series of admissions. The ex-Sens captain even went so far as to describe his choice as selfish.

“It pretty much came down to a selfish decision in terms of I have not won a Stanley Cup,” he said. “[That’s] a big priority for me.”

Report: Kings, Richards nearing settlement

Mike Richards
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The Los Angeles Kings and Mike Richards may be nearing a settlement in their dispute over Richards’ terminated contract, TSN’s Bob McKenzie is reporting.

You can read the report for all the details, but we’re sure curious about this part:

If a settlement is reached, there’s no word yet on what salary cap penalties the Kings would still face. There’s bound to be something, but not likely as onerous as the full value of Richards’ contract, which carries with it a cap hit of $5.75 million. If there’s a settlement, Richards would undoubtedly become a free agent though there’s no telling at this point what monies he would be entitled to from the Kings in a settlement.

The issue here is precedent, and what this case could set. The NHL and NHLPA can’t allow teams to escape onerous contracts through a back door, and many are adamant that that’s what the Kings were attempting to do in Richards’ case.

Bettman to players: Don’t screw up ‘once-in-a-lifetime opportunity’ with drugs

Gary Bettman
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The NHL wants to take an educational approach — not a punitive one — to deter its players from using illicit drugs like cocaine.

“My interest is not to go around punishing people,” Bettman told Sportsnet today.

“My interest is getting players to understand the consequences of doing something that could jeopardize this great, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that they’ve been given, to play in the NHL.”

While some players have expressed surprise at hearing that cocaine use is growing, the anecdotal evidence of substance abuse has been very much in the news, from Jarret Stoll‘s arrest to Mike Richards’ arrest to, more recently, Zack Kassian‘s placement in the NHL/NHLPA’s treatment program.

“We don’t have the unilateral right to do things here. We need the consent of the Players’ Association,” Bettman said. “It’s not about punishment. It’s about making sure we get it to stop.”

Related: Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?