NHL Draft 2013

Here’s your 2013 NHL Entry Draft order

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Sunday in Newark, the 2013 NHL Entry Draft will take place at the Prudential Center.

Via NHL.com, here’s the official selection order:

ROUND 1 ROUND 2 ROUND 3
1. Colorado 31. Florida 62. Phoenix (from Fla-NYR-SJ)
2. Florida 32. Colorado 63. Colorado
3. Tampa Bay 33. Tampa Bay 64. Nashville (from TB)
4. Nashville 34. Montreal (from Nsh.) 65. NY Rangers (from Nsh.)
5. Carolina 35. Carolina 66. Carolina
6. Calgary 36. Montreal (from Cgy.) 67. Calgary
7. Edmonton 37. Edmonton 68. Dallas (from Edm.)
8. Buffalo 38. Buffalo 69. Buffalo
9. New Jersey 39. New Jersey 70. Minnesota (from NJ)
10. Dallas 40. Dallas 71. Montreal (from Dal.)
11. Philadelphia 41. Philadelphia 72. Philadelphia
12. Phoenix 42. Phoenix 73. Phoenix
13. Winnipeg 43. Winnipeg 74. Winnipeg
14. Columbus 44. Columbus 75. NY Rangers (from CBJ)
15. NY Islanders 45. Anaheim (from NYI) 76. NY Islanders
16. Buffalo (from Min.) 46. Minnesota 77. Pittsburgh (from Min-Phi-Dal)
17. Ottawa 47. St. Louis (from Ott.) 78. Ottawa
18. Detroit 48. Detroit 79. Detroit
19. Columbus (from NYR) 49. San Jose (from NYR); 80. NY Rangers
20. San Jose 50. San Jose 81. Minnesota (from SJ)
21. Toronto 51. Toronto 82. Toronto
22. Calgary (from StL) 52. Buffalo (from StL) 83. St. Louis
23. Washington 53. Washington 84. Washington
24. Vancouver 54. Dallas (from Van.) 85. Vancouver
25. Montreal 55. Montreal 86. Montreal
26. Anaheim 56. Edmonton (from Ana.) 87. Anaheim
27. Columbus (from LA) 57. Los Angeles 88. Los Angeles
28. Calgary (from Pit.) 58. San Jose (from Pit.) 89. Pittsburgh
29. Dallas (from Bos.) 59. Winnipeg 90. Boston
30. Chicago 60. Boston 91. Winnipeg (from Chi.)
61. Winnipeg (from Chi.)
ROUND 4 ROUND 5 ROUND 6
92. Florida 122. Florida 152. Florida
93. Colorado 123. Colorado 153. Colorado
94. St. Louis (from TB) 124. Tampa Bay 154. Tampa Bay
95. Nashville 125. Nashville 155. Nashville
96. Los Angeles (from Car.) 126. Carolina 156. Carolina
97. Florida (from Cgy.) 127. Washington (from Cgy.) 157. Calgary
98. Florida (from Edm.) 128. Edmonton 158. Edmonton
99. Nashville (from Buf.) 129. Buffalo 159. Buffalo
100. New Jersey 130. Buffalo (from NJ-LA-Fla.) 160. New Jersey
101. Dallas 131. Dallas 161. Ottawa (from Dal.)
102. Ottawa (from Phi.-TB) 132. Philadelphia 162. Philadelphia
103. L.A. (from Phx-CBJ-Phi.) 133. Phoenix 163. Phoenix
104. Winnipeg 134. Winnipeg 164. Pittsburgh (from Wpg.)
105. Columbus 135. Calgary (from CBJ) 165. Columbus
106. NY Islanders 136. NY Islanders 166. NY Islanders
107. Minnesota 137. Minnesota 167. Minnesota
108. Ottawa 138. Ottawa 168. Ottawa
109. Detroit 139. Detroit 169. Detroit
110. NY Rangers 140. Nashville (from NYR) 170. NY Rangers
111. San Jose 141. San Jose 171. Nashville (from SJ)
112. Nashville (from Tor.) 142. Toronto 172. Toronto
113. St. Louis 143. Buffalo (from StL) 173. St. Louis
114. Washington 144. Washington 174. Washington
115. Vancouver 145. Vancouver 175. Vancouver
116. Montreal 146. Los Angeles (from Mtl.) 176. Montreal
117. Toronto (from Ana.) 147. Anaheim 177. Anaheim
118. Los Angeles 148. Los Angeles 178. Los Angeles
119. Pittsburgh 149. Dallas (from Pit.) 179. Pittsburgh
120. Boston 150. Boston 180. Boston
121. Chicago 151. Chicago 181. Chicago
ROUND 7
182. Dallas (from Fla.)
183. Colorado
184. Tampa Bay
185. Nashville
186. Tampa Bay (from Car.)
187. Calgary
188. Edmonton
189. Buffalo
190. Winnipeg (from NJ)
191. Los Angeles (from Dal.)
192. Philadelphia
193. Phoenix
194. Winnipeg
195. Columbus
196. NY Islanders
197. Minnesota
198. Calgary (from Ott.-Chi.)
199. Detroit
200. Minnesota (from NYR)
201. San Jose
202. Toronto
203. St. Louis
204. Washington
205. Vancouver
206. Montreal
207. San Jose (from Ana.-Col.)
208. Los Angeles
209. Pittsburgh
210. Boston
211. Chicago

Notes:

— Calgary and Columbus each have three first-round selections.

— As it currently stands, the last team to make a pick will be the Penguins, at No. 77. (See: Jarome Iginla, Douglas Murray trades)

— Boston doesn’t make a pick until No. 60 (Jaromir Jagr trade), and the Rangers don’t have one until No. 65 (Rick Nash, Ryane Clowe trades).

— Winnipeg was assigned a compensatory pick at No. 59, as the Jets did not sign 2008 first-round pick Daulton Leveille.

Yahoo’s fantasy hockey position tweaks signal end of a very specific era

WINNIPEG, MB - FEBRUARY 11: Dustin Byfuglien #33 of the Winnipeg Jets prepares for the faceoff in second period action in an NHL game against the Boston Bruins at the MTS Centre on February 11, 2016 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (Photo by Marianne Helm/Getty Images)
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Few things deepen your hockey geekery quite like playing fantasy hockey.

For sports haters and the sports-oblivious, it’s probably bad enough to see grown adults wearing hockey sweaters out in public. What about when someone is obsessing (and sometimes muttering profanities) about a team that only exists to about 8-15 people?

Still, this is the Internet, where niche obsessions can go really deep. Just fall down a rabbit hole about Star Wars extended universe if you want to get a taste.

Us fantasy hockey nerdy dorks got some understandable but still sad news today: it appears to be an end of an era for Dustin Byfuglien and Brent Burns being considered eligible as both right wings and defensemen.

NHL.com trotted out a list of changes to Yahoo’s popular format on Saturday, and the tweaks generally make total sense.

It’s a bit of a bummer, though, as being eligible for a forward and defensive position provided another example of the unusual natures of both Byfuglien and Burns. Luckily, there are about 1,000 Exhibits for each, especially true oddball Burns.

(The debate regarding where either player should line up has largely died out, though.)

Another thing of interest in NHL.com’s list is the most prominent players who can be placed in all three forward spots. That could be a good thing to keep handy if you’re the last-minute preparation type:

The six tri-eligible players among NHL.com’s top 200, Joe Pavelski of the Sharks, Filip Forsberg of the Nashville Predators, Ryan O'Reilly of the Buffalo Sabres, Tyler Toffoli of the Los Angeles Kings, Patrick Sharp of the Dallas Stars and Jussi Jokinen of the Florida Panthers, have had their eligibilities reduced. Forsberg and Jokinen, who are now only eligible at LW, took the biggest hits from that bunch.

Forwards Robby Fabbri (now C/LW), of the St. Louis Blues, and Sam Reinhart, (now C/RW) of the Sabres, are the two players who have gone from single to dual eligibility in Yahoo leagues.

Check out the full article here.

Expect steps in right direction, not leaps, from Flames’ new head coach

DALLAS, TX - NOVEMBER 21:  Head coach Glen Gulutzan of the Dallas Stars at American Airlines Center on November 21, 2011 in Dallas, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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This is part of Calgary Flames day at PHT …

If you’re looking beyond the shaky history of Jack Adams winners and going for a more objective approach, it’s not especially easy to break down the impact of a head coach.

Still, we’ve seen examples where a guy really can make a difference. Mike Sullivan is merely the latest to transform a wobbly team into a champion thanks to some deft maneuvers.

What, then, can the Calgary Flames expect from Glen Gulutzan?

Let’s break down some of the factors involved.

Better goalies, more experienced players

As Flames Nation’s Pat Steinberg notes, Gulutzan’s most immediate advantage of fired Flames head coach Bob Hartley is that Calgary made massive improvements in net.

Brian Elliott and Chad Johnson both carry promising numbers into this situation. Elliott’s work with the St. Louis Blues, in particular, strikes you as All-Star-level.

Of course, some will attribute a significant portion of Elliott’s success to being in Ken Hitchcock’s system, so it’s up to Gulutzan to provide a more nurturing atmosphere than the one Flames goalies have experienced in recent years.

Modest improvements

Steinberg delved a little deeper than Gulutzan’s two Dallas Stars teams (2011-12 and 2012-13) missing the playoffs and found that they were a middle-of-the-pack squad from a possession standpoint. Nothing spectacular there, but Gulutzan did improve the Stars from its previous station.

Upon being hired, Gulutzan pointed to experience as much as anything else when explaining how he improved.

(Which makes sense since … the Vancouver Canucks didn’t exactly set the world on fire while he was an assistant.)

Solid match for personnel

“Possession has become a popular word,” Gulutzan said after the Flames chose him. “For me, what possession is, it’s not always having the puck, because you don’t have it all the time. What we want to be is a real connected group here. When I say connected, we want to be connected in fives in all three zones. We want to defend fast, we are going to defend fast. We’re going to utilize the assets that we have here. In defending fast, you want to get the puck back fast, you want to get it out of your end.”

That quote could probably be attributed to a number of new hires. It’s plausible that you could swap out Gulutzan’s name with that of Colorado Avalanche head coach Jared Bednar.

Even so, the important thing is that Gulutzan is emphasizing key elements of a modern approach. He’s saying the right things about puck possession and wanting to win the transition game.

When you look at the talent assembled in Calgary, particularly on defense, emphasizing speed almost seems obvious.

From Norris-caliber defenseman Mark Giordano to underrated blueliner T.J. Brodie all the way to the talented guys who could use a boost (Dougie Hamilton especially, perhaps Dennis Wideman as well?), the Flames’ defense seems best suited for an attacking style.

The potential drawback is that Brian Elliott and Chad Johnson could be exposed to some extra “high-danger chances” when an attacking style backfires … but the good might outweigh the bad if Gulutzan’s system can stop the possession bleeding.

Tipping point?

The dream scenario for Calgary is that a series of manageable improvements make for a cumulative jump.

Ideally, Gulutzan’s system combines with in-house improvements to young players with a vastly improved set of goalies to transform the Flames into playoff contenders.

In the limited sample size we’ve seen of Calgary’s new head coach, he doesn’t necessarily strike you as a miracle worker. Instead, he’s lauded for the structure he provides and his ability to communicate.

That might be enough for the Flames, especially if they give Gulutzan some time to work through growing pains.

The Flames shouldn’t expect Troy Brouwer to repeat his playoff performance from last year

PHILADELPHIA, PA - DECEMBER 21: Troy Brouwer #36 of the St. Louis Blues looks on against the Philadelphia Flyers at Wells Fargo Center on December 21, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
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This is part of Calgary Flames day at PHT…

Troy Brouwer was a big part of the St. Louis Blues’ run to the Western Conference Final this past spring when he put together a 15-game stretch that saw him record 13 points (eight goals, five assists) to close out the playoffs.

That hot streak was perfect timing for the veteran winger because it not only happened during a time when everybody in the NHL was paying attention (the playoffs), but it also came just weeks before he was set to become an unrestricted free agent. And if there is anything that can boost a player’s value going into free agency, it is a big showing in the postseason. Teams love that stuff, even if it’s not always the most reliable way to project future performance.

Once Brouwer hit the open market it did not take him long to land a spot with the Calgary Flames when they signed him to a four-year, $18 million contract that will run through the end of the 2019-20 season.

Postseason performances like the one Brouwer had for the Blues in 2016 can be a bit of a double-edged sword for both teams and players.

On one hand, it makes it really easy for the player to get noticed and it boosts their reputation because those are the big games you want to see your top players perform in. And when a player gets the reputation for being a big game player that can forever change their reputation and significantly increase their value.

The problem with that is teams can sometimes get into trouble when they make decisions based on that small sampling of play (look no further than big contracts given to players like Dave Bolland, Bryan Bickell and Ville Leino in recent years), and it can help create an unrealistic level of expectation for the player that they are usually unable to match in future years.

And that brings us to what the Flames should expect from one of their big offseason additions.

What he is going to do is come in and give them a veteran presence on the wing that can play a physical game and be around the net to score some dirty goals. In that sense, he will be a fine addition to the team, at least in the short-term.

What he is probably not going to do is score at the same pace the he did in last year’s playoffs when he was a 0.65 point per game player (that is close to 55 points over an 82-game season) and scoring like a first-line winger. Even at his best he has been a 40-point scorer for almost his entire career, and that includes his years in Washington where he was playing on an extremely skilled team with great talent around him. At 31 he is also probably at a point in his career where that production is only going to start declining (it already did last year during the regular season).

If you’re the Flames, a reasonable expectation for Brouwer this season is to bring his gritty style of play, a lot of experience, and maybe 15-20 goals and 30-35 points. And for $4 million per season, that is probably fair production.

The issue the Flames might have, and the one that will make-or-break this contract long-term, is what happens two or three years into the contract and whether or not he is able to maintain that kind of production into his mid-30s.

Poll: Will the Flames be a playoff team in 2016-17?

CALGARY, AB - JANUARY 7: Johnny Gaudreau #13 (L) of the Calgary Flames confers with his teammate Sean Monahan #23 during a break in play against the Detroit Red Wings during an NHL game at Scotiabank Saddledome on January 7, 2015 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. (Photo by Derek Leung/Getty Images)
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This is part of Calgary Flames day at PHT…

When the Calgary Flames reached the second round of the 2015 playoffs there were a lot of concerns about whether or not they could repeat that level of play the following season. Even after adding Dougie Hamilton to their blue line in a trade with the Boston Bruins they were still a popular pick to see a big regression in 2015-16.

They not only regressed and missed the playoffs for the sixth time in seven years, they finished as one of the worst teams in the NHL standings and fired Bob Hartley, the NHL’s coach of the year from the previous season.

Along with hiring a new coach this summer — former Dallas Stars coach Glen Gulutzan — they also added Troy Brouwer in free agency from the St. Louis Blues and overhauled their goaltending by trading for Brian Elliott and signing Chad Johnson in free agency. If the Flames are going to rebound in 2016-17 the latter additions are going to have to be the biggest reason why.

Even though the Flames have Mark Giordano, T.J. Brodie and Hamilton leading their defense, a top-three that can be as good as any other top trio in the NHL. As a team, they only allowed teams to get an average of 29 shots on goal per game, a number that was good enough for the top-10 in the NHL. But because they received the absolute worst goaltending in the NHL and were the only team that couldn’t collectively top a .900 save percentage, it sent the team to the bottom of the goals against leaderboard.

If their goaltenders could manage even a .910 save percentage, which would still be below the league average, on the same number of shots it could shave as many as 40 goals off of that total over the course of an 82-game season. That alone could help close that gap in the playoff race.

Along with what should be an improved goaltending situation and their excellent trio on defense, the Flames also still have that exciting group of young forwards led by Johnny Gaudreau, Sean Monahan and Sam Bennett, and could potentially be adding No. 6 overall pick Matthew Tkachuk to it as well.

Expecting them to catch Anaheim, Los Angeles and San Jose at the top of the Pacific Division definitely seems like a long shot, but the bottom half of the Western Conference has taken a big step backwards over the past couple of years. A team made the playoffs last season with 87 points, and while that number should increase this season, once you get beyond the top five or six teams in the West the field is pretty wide open, and if the Flames can get that improved goaltending from Elliott and Johnson they should be able to be right in the thick of that race.

So, can they do it?