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Chicago’s powerless power play — it’s a problem

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It looked like 2011 all over again.

Midway through the first period of Boston’s 2-0 win in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup Final, Bruins forwards Kaspars Daugavins and Shawn Thornton took less-than-genius roughing penalties, giving the Blackhawks four minutes of power play time.

And — much like what happened repeatedly against Vancouver two years ago — the penalties didn’t cost the B’s.

Some will say the Bruins killed ’em with aplomb, others will argue the ‘Hawks frittered ’em away. But whatever the case, one thing is crystal clear — if Chicago doesn’t start scoring on the power play soon, its going to be in major trouble.

In the 2011 Cup Final, Vancouver went a ghastly 2-for-33 on the power play and the deeper the Canucks’ struggles went, the more the Bruins took liberties, often risking a penalty to impose their physicality.

The risk was worth it ’cause hey, killing the penalty was a virtual lock.

While it’s not quite to that level in 2013, it’s close.

The ‘Hawks were 0-for-5 on the power play in Game 3. That puts them at 0-for-11 for the series and zero for their last 15 all told.

Head coach Joel Quenville was visibly displeased following the game.

“Our power play tonight was definitely not good,” he said. “[The Bruins] box you out. They’ve got big bodies that block shots.

“We had chances to get pucks on the net, and we didn’t. Our entries weren’t great.”

Some other gruesome statistics:

— Chicago’s PP is 1-for-27 on the road in the playoffs.

— Patrick Kane led the team with eight PPG in the regular season.

— He has zero this postseason.

— The ‘Hawks registered just four power play shots in Game 3 on 8:11 of PP time.

— Chicago’s PP is now at 11.5 percent (7-for-61) for the playoffs, worse than its PP in the regular season (which, at a 19th-best 16.7 percent, wasn’t that great.)

On the flip side, the Bruins deserve a ton of credit for how well they’ve killed penalties. The last time they allowed a PPG was in Game 5 of the Rangers series, and have killed 25 straight since then.

But if you’re Chicago — well, you just have to make something happen with the man advantage.

The Bruins are one of the NHL’s best teams at even strength, and they’ve shown it this postseason. They lead all teams with 43 goals 5-on-5, and have only allowed 27 — a differential of plus-16.

The key to beating Boston is to make them pay for mistakes.

If the ‘Hawks don’t start doing it soon, they’re going to get Canuck’d right out of this series.

Wild sign Dumba to two-year, $5.1M deal

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After ongoing contract talks between the Minnesota Wild and restricted free agent defenseman Matt Dumba, the two sides have come to a deal.

The Wild announced Thursday that they had signed Dumba to a two-year deal, worth a total value of $5.1 million.

A breakdown of the new deal:

— In 2016-17: $2.35 million.

— In 2017-18: $2.75 million.

Selected seventh overall by the Wild in 2012, Dumba had his most productive campaign this past season, with 10 goals and 26 points in 81 games.

Known for his offensive skills — he had 20 goals and 57 points with Red Deer in the WHL in his draft year — Dumba also brings a coveted right-shot to the Wild blue line, which features four players with contracts of four or more years of term remaining.

As per General Fanager, the Wild still have $2.168 million in projected cap space, but they have secured all their remaining restricted free agents.

Rangers bring back forward Marek Hrivik

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 09:  Marek Hrivik #46 of the New York Rangers skates against the Detroit Red Wings at Madison Square Garden on April 9, 2016 in New York City. The Rangers defeated the Red Wings 3-2.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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The New York Rangers announced that they’ve re-signed Marek Hrivik to a new contract. The term and financial details of the deal were not released.

Hrivik signed with the Rangers as an undrafted free agent in May 2012. The 24-year-old made his NHL debut in 2015-16 and ended up playing five games for the Rangers. He had one assist and a plus-3 rating during his time in the NHL.

The young forward was an important part of New York’s AHL affiliate in Hartford. Hrivik finished his AHL campaign with 12 goals and 29 assists. He tied for the team lead in assists and finished third in points.

If you go by Hrivik’s tweet, it appears as though he signed a one-year contract:

Now that Hrivik is re-signed, the Rangers have no more free agents of any kind, per General Fanager.

Report: Stone and Coyotes agree to one-year, $4M deal

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Another day, another scheduled arbitration hearing avoided.

According to multiple reports, defenseman Michael Stone and the Arizona Coyotes have settled on a one-year, $4 million deal, well ahead of their scheduled arbitration hearing set for Aug. 4.

Stone, 26, was a restricted free agent coming off a three-year contract with an AAV of $1.15 million.

Last season in Arizona, he hit new career highs in points with 36 and assists with 30. He also logged some heavy minutes, playing more than 22 minutes per game, which was second behind only Oliver Ekman-Larsson. That includes being used on both the power play and penalty kill.

Just more work done for the Coyotes on Thursday.

Earlier in the day, they announced they had signed defenseman Connor Murphy to a six-year contract extension, worth a total of $23.1 million.

Related: Coyotes’ defensive makeover continues with Luke Schenn signing

‘Nothing’s different’: Dale Tallon says he still has final say in Panthers’ personnel decisions

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JUNE 28: Dale Tallon, General Manager of the Florida Panthers, speaks on the phone on Day Two of the 2014 NHL Draft at the Wells Fargo Center on June 28, 2014 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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Despite having a terrific season in 2015-16, the Florida Panthers made a number of changes to their front office. Some of the moves include: Tom Rowe being promoted to general manager, Dale Tallon being named the director of hockey operations and Eric Joyce and Steve Werier serving as assistant general managers.

There’s a lot of confusion as to who gets to make the final call on player personnel decisions in Florida, but Tallon tried to clear that up during a radio interview with 560 WQAM on Thursday.

“It allows me to focus on what I do best,” Tallon said of the front office changes. “And that’s evaluate, travel, scout and give us information on players that will help us win a championship and keep us as a top team for the next 15 years.

“I have a lot to say. I’m a stubborn guy, I have opinions, I have strong opinions and I let them know where I stand and I let them know how I feel. That’s the way it is. The bottom line is what’s best for the team.”

When asked if he still has the final say on personnel decisions, Tallon said: “yes, I do”.

When pressed on the issue, Tallon said this:

“Like I said, it’s by committee, we do it together. We’ve always done that. Nothing’s different. We’ve got great support and things are terrific. We’re really excited about our future, we’re excited about having a chance to win this year.”

It seems curious that the Panthers made all these changes after finally having success and qualifying for the playoffs, but they appear to have strong, committed owners, who are willing to do whatever it takes to put a winning product on the ice. We’ll soon find out if the changes were for the better or not.

To listen to the full interview, click here.