Julien: Seguin-Kelly-Paille line ‘huge’ for Bruins

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Claude Julien found a bit of magic on Saturday night, courtesy a new-look line.

The Bruins head coach put struggling winger Tyler Seguin on a line with Chris Kelly and Daniel Paille, and the trio combined for four points and both goals in a 2-1 OT victory over Chicago at the United Center.

“I put those three guys together, and they answered,” Julien said. “That line came up huge for us tonight.”

The unit was something of a reclamation project.

Kelly came into the night pointless through 17 games this postseason with an ugly minus-9 rating, but scored Boston’s first goal and was on the ice for Paille’s game-winner.

“I think he’s been snakebit for quite a while,” Julien said of Kelly. “When you don’t score, eventually you get scored on and the minuses keep creeping up. That was certainly something that bothered him.”

“Tonight’s a good night for him.”

Paille was something of a turnaround story as well. The 29-year-old winger hadn’t scored in seven straight games heading into Saturday’s affair, but came up huge in overtime.

“Dan skated well tonight,” said Julien. “His forecheck created turnovers, and he was also a lot stronger on the puck. That was a great shot by him [in OT].”

Paille set the tone in the second period with an outstanding move to elude Nick Leddy and set up Kelly for the equalizer.

Seguin, the Bruins’ leading scorer from a year ago, has struggled to find his groove this postseason (just one goal, five points) and has moved all over the lineup.

He replaced Nathan Horton on the “HuLK” line in overtime of Game 1 after Horton was hurt, and started Game 2 with Rich Peverley and Kaspars Daugavins.

Nothing worked — until he was put with Kelly and Paille.

It’s a big development for Boston and one that could be a momentum-changer in this series. If the Bruins are able to roll three lines confidently as this series goes on, it’ll compensate for the loss of the “Merlot Line” that was so effective in the Eastern Conference semis against the Rangers.

Laviolette, Sullivan meet in 1st all-US coaches Cup Final

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Hockey history will be made for American coaches in the Stanley Cup Final.

The Cup has been handed out 89 times to the champion of the NHL since 1927. For the first time, two American coaches will face off in the final as the Nashville Predators’ Peter Laviolette goes up against the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Mike Sullivan.

It’s just the seventh time the Cup will be won by a U.S.-born coach.

“Having two American coaches lead their team in the Stanley Cup Final highlights the continued growth and evolution of the sport in our country,” USA Hockey executive director Dave Ogrean said. “We have more coaches in our country than ever before, and two of our very best are in the final.”

Laviolette and Sullivan are among six U.S.-born current coaches in the NHL, along with the Blue Jackets’ John Tortorella, Red Wings’ Jeff Blashill, Devils’ John Hynes and Islanders’ Doug Weight.

The pair is already on the exclusive list of U.S. coaches to win the Cup: Bill Stewart with the Blackhawks in 1938, “Badger” Bob Johnson with the Penguins in 1991, Tortorella with the Lightning in 2004, Laviolette with the Hurricanes in 2006, Dan Bylsma with the Penguins in 2009 and Sullivan with the Penguins last year.

All of the other Cup-winning coaches are Canadian.

It took until 2012 for two U.S. captains to meet in the final when the Kings’ Dustin Brown faced the Devils’ Zach Parise. Brown, who raised it in 2012 and 2014, is one of just two U.S. captains to win it after the Stars’ Derian Hatcher in 1999.

Brown and Parise embraced the significance of their meeting in the final five years ago. Laviolette and Sullivan might still, but the Predators’ hyper-focused coach isn’t thinking about it as a special occasion while preparing for Game 1 in Pittsburgh on Monday night.

“Not really,” said Laviolette, one of just four coaches to take three different teams to the final. “Sully’s a good coach. I know him, but it’s not about that. It’s about the Stanley Cup. It’s about two teams playing.”

Laviolette, from Franklin, Massachusetts, and Sullivan, from Marshfield, Massachusetts, grew up about an hour apart and are three hours apart in age. Each coached the American Hockey League’s Providence Bruins, served on Boston’s staff briefly and won the Cup in his second NHL coaching stint.

Asked about joining Dick Irvin, Scotty Bowman and Mike Keenan as the only coaches to take three different teams to the final, the 52-year-old Laviolette quipped, “Probably means that I got fired a lot.” As recently as November, an online sportsbook had him listed at 13-2 odds as the first coach fired this season when the Predators lost eight of their first 11 games.

Now he and Sullivan are facing off for hockey’s biggest prize, starting the best-of-seven series on Monday at Pittsburgh.

“It’s fun to see,” Ogrean said. “The only unfortunate thing is that only one of them can win.”

 

The Predators built the NHL’s best defense, and it is going to be around for a while

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The Nashville Predators are preparing to play in their first Stanley Cup Final after marching through the Western Conference playoffs.

Their appearance in this year’s Final is being looked at as a little bit of a surprise because of their place in the standings among the NHL’s playoff teams (16th out of 16 during the regular season) but this was still a team that was looked at before the season as a legitimate contender. They had a disappointing first half that kind poured some cold water on the preseason hype, but since starting 17-16-7 the Predators have put together a rather dominating 36-17-5 stretch (playoffs included) since the first week of January.

They have a defensive unit that rivals any other in the NHL to thank for a lot of that success.

The addition of P.K. Subban over the summer to a group that already included Roman Josi, Ryan Ellis and Mattias Ekholm has given the Predators one of the most dominant top-four groupings in the league, and they all perfectly fit the modern NHL game.

They can call skate at a high level, they can all move the puck, they can all contribute offensively. And they can all play major minutes.

Through the first three rounds of the playoffs coach Peter Laviolette has leaned heavily on that quartet, giving each of them an average of 23 minutes of ice-time per game, meaning that just about every time you look at the TV one of those four players is going to be patrolling the ice. Last week I looked at the ice-time distribution of Nashville’s Stanley Cup final opponent, the Pittsburgh Penguins, and how injuries (specifically the one to Kris Letang) has forced coach Mike Sullivan to take a defense by committee approach where all six defenders on a given night are getting almost the exact same ice-time. Each one plays roughly 30-35 percent of the game in what is a rather unconventional approach for a Stanley Cup Finalist.

In Nashville, it is a little different with each of the top-four playing more than 40 percent of the game, while the bottom pairing of Yannick Weber and Matt Irwin (two solid defensemen in their own right) are only playing about 20 percent of the game … or an average of about 11 minutes per game.

Following their Game 7 win against the Ottawa Senators, Penguins forward Chris Kunitz referred to Nashville’s defense as having “four Erik Karlssons,” and while that might be a little bit of an exaggeration (Karlsson is the NHL’s best defenseman and there probably are not four other defensemen in the league even close to him) it is at least telling as to how much respect this unit has around the league and how good they are.

But what should be a terrifying thought for the rest of the Western Conference is that this unit is going to be around for quite a while and still in the prime of their careers

When looking at the top-four, Subban is the “old man” of the group currently at age 28. They are also all signed for at least two more seasons beyond this one at a combined cap hit of just a little over $19 million per season.

That is a group that contains two of the top-six offensive defensemen in the league (Subban and Josi) over the past three seasons and two of the best shot suppression defensemen (Ekholm and Ellis) over the same stretch (out of more than 250 defensemen to play at least 1,000 minutes of 5-on-5 hockey since 2014-15, Ekholm is seventh in shot attempts against per 60 minutes; Ellis is 45th).

When you combine their ability with the fact that quartet has an average age of just 26.7 years old it is an incredible bargain against the salary cap.

They are backbone of this team, and a big reason why no matter what happens over the next weeks on the ice the Predators should be a formidable contender in the Western Conference for the foreseeable future.

Here are your officials for the 2017 Stanley Cup Final

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The NHL has announced its officials for the 2017 Stanley Cup Final between the Pittsburgh Penguins and Nashville Predators.

They are as follows…

Referees: Wes McCauley, Brad Meier, Dan O’Halloran, Kevin Pollock

Linesmen: Scott Cherrey, Shane Heyer, Brad Kovalchik, Brian Murphy

Overall it’s a pretty experienced group of officials as O’Halloran, Pollock and Meier are among the eight most experienced officials the NHL has in terms of games called in their careers.

McCauley is near the top of the NHL in terms of penalties called per game, while Pollock is near the bottom of the league and seems to fit more into the “let them play” style of officiating. O’Halloran and Meier are not much higher, so you probably should not expect this to turn into a special teams series.

Of course, no matter who the referees are, by the end of Game 2 most of the coaches, players and fans from each side will probably not be happy with any of them.

All referee data via Scouting The Refs

 

Blackhawks sign Michal Kempny to one-year contract

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The Chicago Blackhawks announced on Saturday morning that they have signed defenseman Michael Kempny to a one-year contract that will cover the 2017-18 season.

The 26-year-old Kempny was a restricted free agent this summer. Financial terms of the deal are not yet known.

During the 2016-17 season, Kempny’s first in the NHL, he appeared in 62 games for the Blackhawks and scored two goals to go with eight assists.

With Kempny added back into the mix for next season the Blackhawks now have seven defensemen under contract as Kempny joins Duncan Keith, Brent Seabrook, Niklas Hjalmarsson, Gustav Forsling, Trevor van Riemsdyk and Michal Rozsival.

Veterans Brian Campbell and Johnny Oduya are set to become unrestricted free agents on July 1.