The Morning Skate: Can Chicago continue Cup trends?

News and notes entering tonight’s Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Final. More OT on the way?

Game 2: Boston Bruins at Chicago Blackhawks, 8 ET (NBCSN)Blackhawks lead series, 1-0

In Game 1, the Blackhawks overcame a two-goal, third-period deficit, and Andrew Shaw’s goal 12:08 into the third overtime lifted them to a dramatic 4-3 win over the Bruins in the fifth-longest game in Stanley Cup Final history. Tonight, the Hawks will look to become the eighth straight team since 2006 to win the first two games of a Final series. Five of the previous seven teams – Carolina, Anaheim, Detroit (2008), Chicago, Los Angeles – that went up two-games-to-none won the Cup. Only Detroit (2009, to Pittsburgh) and Vancouver (2011, to Boston) eventually lost, both in seven games.

Nineteen skaters (10 Blackhawks, nine Bruins) were on the ice for 30+ minutes in the series opener, but it is injury, not fatigue, that could force a lineup change in Game 2. The Bruins’ top line of Nathan Horton, Milan Lucic and David Krejci (a.k.a. the “HuLK Line”), which has registered 57 points (21 goals, 36 assists) in 17 games this postseason, may be without the services of Horton, who aggravated an upper-body injury (believed to be a left shoulder subluxation) midway through the first overtime of Game 1. However, Horton was a full participant in Friday’s practice, skating without visible issues and firing slapshots on backup goaltender Anton Khudobin. Although head coach Claude Julien classified Horton as “day-to-day” and a “game-day decision,” the Bruins seem optimistic that he will play. In case he is unable to go, Tyler Seguin will take his place on the right side next to Krejci, possibly opening the door for Carl Soderberg or Jordan Caron on the third line.

The Blackhawks are expected to go with the same lines that propelled them in the latter parts of Game 1. Rookie Brandon Saad, who scored his first-career postseason goal, will remain on the left wing of the top line with Jonathan Toews and Marian Hossa. Bryan Bickell, tied for the team lead with eight goals this postseason, will stay on the third line wing, alongside center Dave Bolland and Shaw. That trio was on the ice for Shaw’s triple-overtime winner in the series opener.

A Blackhawks win would mark the 58th win for home teams (in 82 games) this postseason, a new NHL record. The 57 home wins coming in is tied with the mark set in 1991, in 92 games.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Blackhawks’ Duncan Keith is the first player to play 40+ minutes in consecutive postseason games (40:12 in Game 5 vs. Kings, 48:40 in Game 1 vs. Bruins) since the Stars’ Richard Matvichuk did so in the 2000 Stanley Cup Final (41:19 in Game 5 & 40:05 in Game 6 vs. Devils).

GAME 1 SUPERLATIVES

  • 112:08 playing time (5th longest Stanley Cup Final game of all-time)
  • 59:54 playing time between game-tying (Johnny Oduya) and game-winning (Andrew Shaw) goal
  • 117 combined shots on goal (most in Cup Final game since 1996, Game 4 – Colorado at Florida – 119), led by Marian Hossa (10) and Brandon Saad (9)
  • 217 shot attempts, led by Hossa (16) and Patrick Sharp (15)
  • 110 combined saves (most in Cup Final game since 1996, Game 4 – Colorado at Florida – 118)
  • 59 saves by Tuukka Rask (most in Cup Final game since 1996, Game 4 – Patrick Roy, Colorado – 63)
  • 120 combined hits, led by Andrew Ference (10), Bryan Bickell, Brandon Bollig & Andrew Shaw (9)
  • 63 combined blocked shots, led by Dennis Seidenberg (9) and Ference (8)
  • 114 combined faceoffs
  • 44 faceoffs taken by Jonathan Toews (23 won)
  • 27 faceoffs won by Patrice Bergeron (41 taken)
  • 48:40 time-on-ice for Duncan Keith (48:36 for Seidenberg)

TOEWS, BERGERON TAKE HOME INDIVIDUAL AWARDS

Two Stanley Cup Final participants were selected as winners on the first day of NHL Awards on Friday.

The Blackhawks’ Jonathan Toews (75 first-place votes, 1,260 points) won his first-ever Frank J. Selke Trophy as the “forward who best excels in the defensive aspects of the game,” edging out last year’s winner, the Bruins’ Patrice Bergeron (78, 1,250), by only ten points. The Red Wings’ three-time Selke winner, Pavel Datsyuk (8, 737), finished third in the voting. Toews spearheaded a Chicago team that allowed the fewest goals in the NHL (97) and posted the third-best penalty kill (87.2%) this regular season, while scoring 23 goals (T-5th in NHL), making 56 takeaway (T-most), and winning 59.9% of his faceoffs.

Bergeron did not leave empty-handed. The Bruins’ alternate captain won the King Clancy Memorial Trophy, awarded “to the player who best exemplifies leadership on and off the ice and who has made a noteworthy humanitarian contribution to his community.” On the ice, the longest-tenured Bruin (2003 draft) registered 32 points (T-3rd on the team), won 62.1% of his faceoffs (best in the NHL) and posted a +24 rating (6th in the league) this regular season. Off the ice, he has been active with several charitable organizations in the Boston metropolitan area for several years, in particular developing “Patrice’s Pals,” an organization which helps kids in local hospitals experience Bruins home games from a luxury suite at TD Garden.

Today, the Hart (most valuable player), Calder (top rookie), Norris (top defenseman) and Vezina (top goaltender) trophies, as well as the Ted Lindsay Award (most outstanding player), will be awarded on NBCSN, beginning at 7 ET.  Only one player on either the Bruins or Blackhawks is a finalist for any of these honors: the Blackhawks’ Brandon Saad (Calder Trophy).

LINKS

  • Hurting Nathan Horton has heart [WEEI]
  • Bad boy Patrick Kane grows up [Globe and Mail]
  • Patrice Bergeron making the grade in Boston [ESPN]
  • Tuukka Rask, Corey Crawford finally earning some recognition [Canadian Press]
  • Illinois politicians support Blackhawks, sometimes from afar [New York Times]

U.S. women end drought, beat Canada for Olympic gold in a shootout

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GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — The Americans’ gold medal drought in women’s hockey is finally over. They needed the first shootout in an Olympic women’s final to do it, too.

Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson scored a dazzling, triple-deke goal in the sixth round of a shootout thriller and Maddie Rooney stuffed the last two Canadians to wrap up a 3-2 victory over archrival Canada on Thursday.

The Americans piled over the boards, throwing gloves in the air before huddling and hugging on the ice – 20 years after the women’s last gold medal in women’s hockey and 20 years to the day after he men’s famous ”Miracle on Ice” victory over the Russians in group play at Lake Placid.

”I can’t put it into words,” defenseman Kacey Bellamy said. ”This whole year is for everyone that came before us. This is for Julie Chu (former USA team captain) and for all our families at home, the schools that we went to, everyone supporting us.”

Lamoureux-Davidson’s shootout goal was the talk of the game. She feinted a wrist shot, then drew Szabados out of the net by faking a backhand and came back to slide the puck past Szabados’ outstretched leg into the open net for the clinching score.

Gigi Marvin and Amanda Kessel also scored in the shootout, another nail-biter ending four years after Canada won its fourth-straight gold medal in Sochi after rallying to stun the Americans in overtime.

Monique Lamoureux-Morando tied it up with a breakaway with 6:21 left in regulation . Hilary Knight also had a goal, but Rooney was spectacular, making 29 saves for the win. The 20-year-old goalie stopped the last two Canadian shooters in the shootout in Brianne Jenner and then Meghan Agosta on her second attempt.

It was sweet redemption for the 10 Americans who watched the Canadians snatch gold away in Sochi. Not only did the Americans end the Canadians’ stranglehold on Olympic gold, they ended a skid of five straight against their rival coming into this game, including a 2-1 loss in the tournament a week ago.

”It is everything for our country,” U.S. coach Robb Stauber said. ”I am just so thankful for the outcome. It was a thrilling final. It was unreal.”

Marie-Philip Poulin and Haley Irwin each scored goals for Canada. Agosta and Melodie Daoust scored in the shootout.

The Canadians wept on the ice as they accepted their silver medals. Jocelyne Larocque took hers off immediately and held it in her hands as the Americans settled in to accept gold.

”It’s just hard,” she said. ”You work so hard. We wanted gold but didn’t get it.”

Added Canada coach Laura Schuler: ”There’s not a lot of words that can describe how you feel. It was a great game of hockey. It’s what we expected: back and forth hockey.”

The Americans had dominated the women’s game in non-Olympic years, winning the last four and eight of the last 10 world championships, including a 3-2 overtime victory over Canada last spring.

It only made the lack of gold at the Olympics all the more noticeable, and Canada has been in their way since losing the inaugural gold in Nagano in 1998. Canada had won 24 straight Olympic games to go along with those four consecutive gold medals – a streak of success in a women’s team sport second only to the U.S. basketball team’s current streak of six straight gold.

This was the eighth time these North American rivals had met in the Olympics and the fifth with gold on the line. None of the previous seven was decided by more than two goals.

U.S. coach Robb Stauber went with Rooney in net for the biggest game of her career – the goalie for each of the three wins against Canada last fall during a pre-Olympic exhibition tour.

Canada had Shannon Szabados in goal for her third Olympic gold medal game, and her teammates made her job very easy by keeping the puck in front of Rooney for most of the first period by dictating play. The Americans couldn’t use their speed or get organized even with two power plays until Sarah Nurse went in the box for interference late in the period.

Knight gave the U.S. a 1-0 lead with 25.4 seconds left in the first, redirecting a shot from Sidney Morin through Szabados’ pads to give the Americans a jolt of energy.

That lasted only 2 minutes into the second when Irwin tipped a midair pass from Blayre Turnbull over Rooney’s left leg for Canada. And when Morin lost the puck, Melodie Daoust grabbed it and passed to Meghan Agosta who hit Poulin for the wrister into the left side of the net at 6:55 for a 2-1 lead.

Be sure to visit NBCOlympics.com and NBC Olympic Talk for full hockey coverage from PyeongChang.

The Buzzer: Miller steals one for Ducks, Vegas back in top spot

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Be sure to visit NBCOlympics.com and NBC Olympic Talk for full hockey coverage from PyeongChang.

Player of the Night: Ryan Miller, Anaheim Ducks

The Anaheim Ducks picked up a huge win on Wednesday night in their quest for a playoff spot and they have veteran goalie Ryan Miller to thank for it.

They leaned on Miller to pretty much steal their 2-0 game against the Dallas Stars.

He ended up stopping all 41 shots he faced, including 24 in the third period.

It was during that third period where the Ducks were able to put the game away after killing a 5-on-3 power play that included a shorthanded goal from Ryan Getzlaf.

The Ducks have now won four games in a row and are just one point back of the San Jose Sharks for second place in the Pacific Division.

Vegas Back On Top

You just can not stop the Vegas Golden Knights.

Thanks to their dominant 7-3 win over the Calgary Flames on Wednesday the first-year team is back on top of the NHL standings with 84 points, moving one point ahead of the Tampa Bay Lightning.

It was another balanced effort from the Vegas lineup as they received goals from seven different players, including William Karlsson who scored his 31st goal of the season.

It is still amazing to think about the fact they only have 22 games remaining in the regular season and an expansion team is in a position to win the Presidents’ Trophy.

Their 84 points is now the most ever by an expansion team. That number will continue to rise.

Highlight of the Night

The aforementioned Ryan Getzlaf shorthanded goal was quite the effort!

Highlight of the Night Part 2

Ryan Carpenter scores this slick between-the-legs goal to get Vegas rolling.

Factoid of the Night

Reilly Smith scored his 20th goal of the season for Vegas on Wednesday night and gives Vegas five 20-goal scorers. Not many expansion teams have done that. Of course, not many expansion teams have been capable of doing a lot of the things Vegas has accomplished this season.

Scores

Chicago Blackhawks 4, Ottawa Senators 3

Anaheim Ducks 2, Dallas Stars 0

Vegas Golden Knights 7, Calgary Flames 3

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Trade: Kings get Rieder, Wedgewood from Coyotes for Kuemper

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Be sure to visit NBCOlympics.com and NBC Olympic Talk for full hockey coverage from PyeongChang.

With the trade deadline inching closer the Los Angeles Kings made their second trade in as many weeks on Wednesday evening.

Let us take a look at the deal!

The trade: The Kings acquire Tobias Rieder and Scott Wedgewood from the Arizona Coyotes for Darcy Kuemper. Arizona is also retaining 15 percent of Rieder’s salary. He will be a restricted free agent after this season.

Why the Kings are making this trade: Let’s check in with Kings general manager Rob Blake for his take on the deal.

“We continue to look for opportunities to improve our team speed and Tobias will bring that dynamic to our club.”

Okay, that’s actually pretty important. A few days ago I wrote about how the Kings needed to hit the reset button on how they play because the league seems to have passed them by. They are not overly skilled. They do not have a ton of speed. They could use more in both areas.

Rieder, though having a really down year, could help improve that. He certainly improves the speed dynamic for the team and he seems to have the potential for a bounce back in Los Angeles because he is capable of more production than he has shown so far this season.

Kuemper has been great in a backup role this season so it’s a little surprising to see the Kings make that swap, but Rieder is at least an interesting addition.

Why the Coyotes are making this trade: That’s actually … a little bit of a mystery?

One potential angle on it is that Antti Raanta is an unrestricted free agent after this season while Kuemper is signed for two more years at a pretty cheap salary cap hit. The Coyotes make it sound like they still plan on keeping Raanta, but if nothing else this provides them with a little bit of insurance in case they can’t.

Here is Coyotes general manager John Chayka.

“Darcy is a big, talented goaltender who is having an excellent year. You need great goaltending in this league in order to be successful and with Antti and Darcy, we are confident that we have an excellent tandem for the future.”

Who won the trade? I like what it does for the Kings because they need someone like Rieder to step into their lineup. Someone fast, someone that still has the chance to score a bit more than they have shown this season. With Jonathan Quick locked in place for the foreseeable future Kuemper was never going to be anything more than a backup there so they did not really have to give up a significant piece.

Did the Coyotes give up on Rieder too soon? We will see.

[Related: Kings get Dion Phaneuf from Ottawa Senators]

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Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

U.S. women back looking for Olympic gold vs. archrival Canada

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Be sure to visit NBCOlympics.com and NBC Olympic Talk for full hockey coverage from PyeongChang.

GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — To three-time Olympian Hilary Knight, the thought of finally hoisting the gold medal means giving women’s hockey a big boost in the United States.

How big?

Huge.

”The U.S. wants to be No. 1 in everything, and I think we’ve all been raised as awesome competitors so at the end of the day we want a victory,” Knight said. ”We want to win, and that would be winning a gold medal.”

That’s the only shade of medal that has eluded the Americans since 1998, the last time they won it all in Nagano when women’s hockey made its Olympic debut. They took home a disappointing bronze from Turin in 2006 and silver from the past two finals – no loss more crushing than in 2014 in Sochi when Canada rallied from an 0-2 deficit to win 3-2 in overtime.

Now the Americans have their latest chance at Olympic gold (Wednesday, 11:10 p.m. ET, NBCSN) against their archrival in a showdown Thursday that will include Marie-Philip Poulin, whose two goals snatched gold from U.S. hands in Sochi. She is back again as Canada’s captain.

”For me, it’s been a fairy tale for the last Olympics,” Poulin said. ”But it’s in the past now. It’s a new Olympics, and we have to bring our best game and go from there.”

This game once again features the only two nations ever to win Olympic gold.

Nothing less than a fifth straight gold medal is expected in the country that created the sport, and the Canadians have won the past four Olympic gold-medal games. Only the United States in basketball has dominated a women’s team sport more thoroughly with its streak of six straight golds.

The Canadians haven’t lost even a single Olympic game since the 1998 Nagano final won by the United States. Their streak stands at 24 consecutive games, including a 2-1 win over the United States to cap pool play a week ago. They’ve also won five straight over the Americans, including four exhibition victories in December prepping for the Olympics.

”Maybe I’m biased, but one of the best rivalries in sports and especially in our game,” said Canadian forward Emily Clark, who played college hockey at Wisconsin. ”So we obviously have a lot on the line, mostly pride. All of us are going to bring our best game.”

Yet the Americans have owned the world championships, winning the last four and eight of the last 10. That has only made the U.S. drought at the Olympics all the more noticeable and makes this game even more special.

”It’s been something I’ve been dreaming about since I was little,” said U.S. forward Dani Cameranesi. ”So it means a lot, and to be here with this group of girls and to be with them all year has really been an honor.”

The 10 Americans who lost the final in Sochi have left that game in the past. No need to waste energy dwelling on such a heartbreaker when the chance at history is at hand. Cameranesi is among 13 Americans on the roster at their first Olympics, so Sochi is just a game they may have watched on TV.

”We’re in South Korea, and it’s 2018 and you want a different result,” U.S. coach Robb Stauber said . ”They’ve put a lot of energy and focus into transforming things that they needed to get better at, and that’s now. You drop the puck, see what happens.”

When the Americans and Canadians play, it’s essentially a heavyweight bout even if nobody drops the gloves.

”Every single time we play them, it’s a big game,” Canada coach Laura Schuler said. ”You know the crowds there, people. There’s always pressure every single time when you represent your country and you play best on best competition. I think it’s something that we’re used to.”

Follow Teresa M. Walker at http://www.twitter.com/teresamwalker