Did Doug Wilson get the distraction he wanted?


On Saturday, the NHL fined the San Jose Sharks $100,000 for comments made by GM Doug Wilson regarding the Raffi Torres suspension.

While expensive, this might’ve been what Wilson wanted.

The Sharks head into Saturday’s Game 3 of the Western Conference semifinals down 0-2 to the Kings, a series that featured a wild Game 2 in which LA scored twice in the final 1:43 to erase a one-goal deficit and capture a stunning win.

For the Sharks, that loss was tough to swallow.

They rallied from a two-goal deficit and looked on their way to stealing home-ice advantage before a pair of penalties — including a controversial “over the glass” call to defenseman Marc-Edouard Vlasic for delay of game — allowed LA to score two powerplay goals.

There were plenty of questions being asked of San Jose in the aftermath. Many focused on the Vlasic penalty — the Sharks organization felt his clearing attempt ricocheted off Jeff Carter’s stick — and whispers started:

Could they handle the gut-punch loss? Was this going to be another in a long line of playoff disappointments in San Jose?

So maybe, just maybe, Wilson wanted to take the heat off his club.

Consider, for a second, the lengths Wilson went to defend Torres — who, while an impactful player, is hardly the face of the franchise. Torres has been with the Sharks for all of six weeks and 16 games. (He’s the true definition of a playoff rental; his contract expires in July.)

Then, consider Wilson’s and the organization’s history with the NHL.

The Sharks rarely voice public displeasure or carry the reputation of a contentious club, especially when it comes the league discipline. And since Brendan Shanahan arrived as the NHL’s discipline czar, punishment for the club has been minimal — Ryane Clowe was fined last year and suspended (two games) this year; Vlasic was fined this season.

Then came Torres, and Wilson’s 414-word rebuke.

If Wilson is indeed trying to deflect attention from his club, he wouldn’t be the first GM to do so. Brian “Sedin is not Swedish for punch me, or headlock me in a scrum” Burke and Mike Gillis (who was fined for his attempt) have both done it in the playoffs, when times are desperate and management is willing to try anything to get an edge.

Of course, Wilson will have to wait until tonight to find out if he got said edge. Should the Sharks lose, this’ll end up as nothing more than an expensive attempt at one.

In Jets return, Burmistrov delivers headshot to Bergeron (Updated)

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Didn’t take long for Alex Burmistrov to make his presence felt — though not in a good way.

Burmistrov, playing in his first game for the Jets after a two-year stint in Russia, delivered a questionable elbow to the head of Boston’s Patrice Bergeron late in the first period of Thursday’s season-opener:

Burmistrov received a two-minute minor for an illegal check to the head, while Bergeron received a matching minor for roughing (retaliating for the elbow, specifically).

The Bruins went into the intermission leading 1-0, and have yet to update Bergeron’s status.

Update: Bergeron stayed in the game, but B’s head coach Claude Julien was none too pleased with the hit. Following the game, he called for the NHL’s Department of Player Safety to look at it…

Two-for-two: Another successful coach’s challenge as Sens reverse Kane’s goal

Dave Cameron
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Coaches are quickly getting the hang of this challenge thing.

Following Mike Babcock’s successful challenge in Toronto’s opening-night loss to Montreal on Wednesday, Babcock’s provincial rival — Sens head coach Dave Cameron — got it right as well, successfully reversing Evander Kane‘s would-be equalizer in the third period.

From the league:

At 10:34 of the third period in the Senators/Sabres game, Ottawa requested a Coach’s Challenge to review whether Buffalo was off-side prior to Evander Kane’s goal.

After reviewing all available replays and consulting with NHL Hockey Operations staff, the Linesman determined that Buffalo’s Zemgus Girgensons was off-side prior to the goal. According to Rule 78.7, “The standard for overturning the call in the event of a ‘GOAL’ call on the ice is that the Linesman, after reviewing any and all available replays and consulting with the Toronto Video Room, determines that one or more Players on the attacking team preceded the puck into the attacking zone prior to the goal being scored and that, as a result, the play should have been stopped for an “Off-side” infraction; where this standard is met, the goal will be disallowed.”

Therefore the original call is overturned – no goal Buffalo Sabres.

The clock is re-set to show 9:32 (10:28 elapsed time), when the off-side infraction occurred.

As the league later noted, this was the first coach’s challenge under the offside scenario.