Francis Bouillon #55 of the Montreal Canadiens dives for the puck in front of Patrice Bergeron #37 of the Boston Bruins in the third period during the game on March 27, 2013 at TD Garden in Boston, Massachusetts.
(March 26, 2013 - Source: Jared Wickerham/Getty Images North America)

Datsyuk, Bergeron, Toews are the Selke nominees


The NHL has announced that the battle for the Frank J. Selke Trophy has come down to Detroit’s Pavel Datsyuk, Boston’s Patrice Bergeron, and Chicago’s Jonathan Toews.

The award recognizes the NHL’s top defensive forward.

Datsyuk won the award three consecutive years between 2008-10, but his streak was broken in 2010–11 when he was limited to 56 games. To date only one player, Bob Gainey, has won the four times, but Datsyuk has put forward a strong case this year. Datsyuk averaged 20:10 minutes per game and finished with a plus-21 rating.

Although plus/minus doesn’t usually hold a lot of weight, keep in mind that only two other Red Wings players had plus/minus ratings in the positive double-digits and neither approached his total. If you want to dive into advanced stats, Datsyuk skated against 19th-toughest competition in the league among forwards that participated in at least 30 contests. None of forwards ahead of him on that list did any better than a plus-seven rating.

Datsyuk also tied fellow nominee Toews for the league-lead in takeaways with 56.

Bergeron won the Selke Trophy for the first time last year. He led the Bruins with a plus-24 rating and was second among Boston forwards with an averaged 2:12 shorthanded minutes per contest. Boston ranked fourth in the NHL with a 87.1 penalty-killing percentage.

He came up big on the draw when the Bruins were down a man, but faceoffs in general are his bread-and-butter. He led the league with a dominating 62.1 faceoff percentage.

Toews, from a statistical perspective was sort of a mesh between Bergeron and Datsyuk. Toews takeaway numbers were already touched on, but he also ranked second in the NHL with a 59.9 faceoff percentage. He also finished third in the NHL with a plus-28 rating, but what was more impressive was his plus-21 rating on the road. That’s the best any has done since 2009-10.

Toews is also the only player among the finalists to finish the season with a plus/minus ratio over 20 and at least 20 goals.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.