Discuss: Blues take Game 1 over Kings in OT


It looked like the St. Louis Blues would need only one goal to beat the L.A. Kings on Tuesday. It turned out they needed two.

The Blues took a 1-0 series lead over the L.A. Kings, the defending Stanley Cup champions, in Game 1 of their Western Conference quarter-final with a 2-1 overtime victory.

Alexander Steen, who scored the first goal of the hockey game in the first period, also scored in overtime – short-handed, no less – on a puck-handling mistake from Kings goalie Jonathan Quick.

The Kings were badly outplayed through most of the first three periods, but Justin Williams tied the score with only 31 seconds remaining in regulation to send the game into overtime.

Here are some talking points:

  • The Kings were slow to answer to the Blues’ physical play. St. Louis was already billed as a bruising opponent, but it was Ryan Reaves and Adam Cracknell who led the way in that aspect, combining for 14 hits on the night. The total of registered hits by the end of the night actually favored the Kings by a count of 41-38.
  • The Kings had no room to create much of anything offensively. In the third period, the shots were, at one point, 11-1 for St. Louis. But, all it takes in a one-goal is one shot to change everything. Justin Williams can attest.
  • Jonathan Quick, last year’s Conn Smythe Trophy winner as the playoff MVP, showed last year’s form. He made 40 saves and was spectacular right up until the OT winner. He made a mistake playing the puck behind the Kings net that immediately led to the Steen winner.
  • The Blues got some pretty decent goaltending, even if Brian Elliott didn’t face nearly the same onslaught that Quick did. Elliott made 28 saves. He has allowed just one goal in each of his last three regular season starts, and this first playoff start.
  • Talk about tough: Kings’ defenseman Robyn Regehr took a David Backes skate to the nose early in the third period. He was dripping blood and had to go to the dressing for repairs. He returned just a few minutes later.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.