Jonathan Toews

Toews: Presidents’ Trophy ‘doesn’t mean a whole lot’ to ‘Hawks


With just four games left in the regular season and holding a five point lead atop the NHL, the Blackhawks are on the verge of capturing their first Presidents’ Trophy since the 1990-91 season.

Not that their captain is very excited about it.

“It’s a cool thing that people talk about, but they won’t talk about it very long,” Jonathan Toews told the Chicago Daily Herald. “It’s not that important.

“Of course we want to be the best and put ourselves at the top for the entire season, but the fact it’s called the President’s Trophy doesn’t mean a whole lot to us.”

Capturing the regular season title has always been odd for players to contextualize.

It’s a significant accomplishment — especially for Chicago this year, given its record-setting points streak — but one that massively pales in comparison to winning the Stanley Cup.

That said, winning this year’s Presidents’ Trophy would be cool for the Blackhawks from a historical standpoint. It would put them in a conversation with the great ’90-91 team that featured Ed Belfour, Jeremy Roenick, Chris Chelios, Steve Larmer and Michel Goulet, the first and only Chicago team to win the regular season title.

It would also ensure Chicago home-ice advantage throughout the playoffs, so that’s something.

There’s another issue to consider with the Presidents’ Trophy, though:

The hex it’s thrown on recent winners.

Since the 2004 lockout, four of seven winners were bounced in the opening round of the playoffs, including last year’s winner — the Vancouver Canucks, who were eliminated in five games by the eventual Stanley Cup champion Kings.

‘Hawks head coach Joel Quenneville said that, with all the parity in the league, winning the Presidents’ Trophy doesn’t mean much come playoff time.

“Hey, we saw last year with the eighth seed that anybody can win,” he explained. “The parity and closeness of all the teams, if anybody can get on a roll and take off and go, they think they can win it.”

Video: Flyers, Bolts confirm 3-on-3 OT is pretty much the greatest thing ever


Well, the NHL’s two new initiatives for ’15-16 seem to be going swimmingly.

Not long after Ottawa successfully made the second-ever coach’s challenge, fans got their first look at 3-on-3 overtime.

And what a look it was.

In the span of 137 seconds, the Tampa Bay Lightning and Philadelphia Flyers combined for eight shots on goal, a few breakaways, some tremendous saves — including one on a penalty shot — and, finally, Jason Garrison‘s game-winning goal on a breakaway from center, giving the Bolts a 3-2 win.

It was, in a word, fun.

Lots of fun.

A quick sampling of reviews:

Of course, not everybody was a fan:

Now, to temper things a bit — this was the first time we’ve seen 3-on-3 with something on the line, so there was a novelty factor at play. There’s also no guaranteeing future OT sessions will be as exciting as this.

But none of that takes away from the fact 3-on-3 made for appointment viewing, and immense entertainment value. The prospect of future games like this? That’s pretty exciting.

In Jets return, Burmistrov delivers headshot to Bergeron (Updated)


Didn’t take long for Alex Burmistrov to make his presence felt — though not in a good way.

Burmistrov, playing in his first game for the Jets after a two-year stint in Russia, delivered a questionable elbow to the head of Boston’s Patrice Bergeron late in the first period of Thursday’s season-opener:

Burmistrov received a two-minute minor for an illegal check to the head, while Bergeron received a matching minor for roughing (retaliating for the elbow, specifically).

The Bruins went into the intermission leading 1-0, and have yet to update Bergeron’s status.

Update: Bergeron stayed in the game, but B’s head coach Claude Julien was none too pleased with the hit. Following the game, he called for the NHL’s Department of Player Safety to look at it…