Marian Gaborik

2013 Trade Deadline winners and losers

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The NHL’s general managers resembled college students waiting until the last night to start cramming for a final exam on trade deadline day, stuffing big deals into the last couple hours. In fact, it’s possible this post might be dramatically changed by a late-breaking swap.

Still, with the information we have in front of us, here’s a look at the winners and losers:

Winners

Columbus Blue Jackets

For what has to be one of the first times in franchise history, the Blue Jackets were “buyers” during the deadline … and they landed a huge potential difference-maker. For all his warts, Marian Gaborik can be an elite scorer when healthy and happy. They also managed to get rid of Steve Mason, which is a victory in itself.

Minnesota Wild

The Minnesota Wild greatly improved their chances of holding onto the Northwest Division crown by landing Buffalo Sabres captain Jason Pominville. He brought six straight 20+ goal seasons into this condensed campaign, so he could push them closer to contender status.

Pittsburgh Penguins

Many believed that the Pens won the deadline before Wednesday rolled around with Jarome Iginla, Douglas Murray and Brenden Morrow added to the mix. With all that size and grit, Pittsburgh decided to inject a little more finesse today by acquiring Jussi Jokinen. Not bad.

Tampa Bay Lightning and Ottawa Senators

The Cory Conacher-for-Ben Bishop trade is a great example of a deal where both teams won. The Bolts get a big goalie who has put up great numbers this season while the Senators received an intriguing young player for a netminder made redundant by the Craig Anderson/Robin Lehner combo.

San Jose Sharks

The Sharks managed to turn Murray, Ryane Clowe and Michal Handzus into a bevvy of picks without blowing up their playoff chances. Dealing a third-round pick for Raffi Torres doesn’t seem wise, but overall, they did very well.

Boston Bruins

They didn’t make huge gains, but Jaromir Jagr can really help their power play and Wade Redden might fill at least some of those offensive defenseman needs.

Calgary Flames

Sure, the Flames probably waited too long to do it, but they probably get the gold medal among the few selling/rebuilding teams with a nice haul of picks for Iginla and Jay Bouwmeester.

(And yes, we understand the inherent irony of associating the Flames with winning.)

St. Louis Blues

Defense has been a problem for the Blues a season after it was a big strength in 2011-12. Adding Bouwmeester (and to a lesser extent, Jordan Leopold) could change that.

James Reimer

No Roberto Luongo trade? That works.

Losers

Roberto Luongo and Cory Schneider

The Vancouver Canucks got better by adding Derek Roy, but their goalie duo still has to deal with all that awkwardness, whether they display good humor or not.

New York Rangers

In the grand scheme of things, the Rangers traded Gaborik for Clowe. That’s a big step back.

Detroit Red Wings

GM Ken Holland admitted he was aiming for a high-end forward and/or defenseman. That didn’t happen, so Detroit remains a team that is a little thin beyond its big names.

New Jersey Devils

Steve Sullivan isn’t likely to stem the tide for a team that’s hurting without Ilya Kovalchuk.

Anyone who took the day off

You probably could have gotten your fill with a few PHT page refreshes in the last couple hours. Hopefully you at least slept in.

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Being named Oilers captain would be ‘one of the greatest honours,’ says McDavid

Connor McDavid
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It began gaining momentum well before Connor McDavid even finished his rookie season, the prospect that the young phenom had what it takes to become captain of the Edmonton Oilers.

Wayne Gretzky had his say, in an interview with the National Post last season.

“I have a great deal of respect for him. In my point of view, I think he’s mature enough that he can handle it at any age,” said The Great One, the Oilers captain when that franchise was a dynasty in the 1980s.

McDavid’s highly anticipated rookie season was interrupted with a shoulder injury, but he returned to play in 45 games, with 48 points. He was named a finalist for the Calder Trophy, and there was plenty of healthy debate for his case to be the top freshman in the league.

As his season continued and then ended, the talk of McDavid’s possible captaincy in Edmonton has persisted. The Oilers, who traded Taylor Hall last month, didn’t have a captain this past season.

From Sportsnet’s Mark Spector, in April:

Connor McDavid will be named as the Oilers’ captain at the age of 19 next fall, one of the items that was deduced at general manager Peter Chiarelli’s season-ending press briefing Sunday. Asked if his team would have a captain next season where this year it did not, the GM responded quickly: “I would think so, that we would have a captain next year.”

At 19 years and 286 days, Avalanche forward Gabriel Landeskog became the youngest player in NHL history to be named a captain.

McDavid, the first overall pick in 2015, doesn’t turn 20 years old until Jan. 13 of next year.

He’s already the face of the Oilers and perhaps soon, the NHL, too. He certainly doesn’t seem to shy away from the potential of one day being named the Oilers captain.

“Obviously. If I was ever the captain at any point I think it would be one of the greatest honours and one of the accomplishments that I would definitely take the most seriously,” McDavid told the Toronto Sun.

“I don’t want to comment on it too much, but obviously it would be an unbelievable feeling.”

Trevor Daley surprises young hockey players, firefighters with Stanley Cup visit

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Trevor Daley had his day with the Stanley Cup on Saturday, taking it through Toronto, surprising young hockey players at a local rink and firefighters at a local station.

He also held a private viewing party for family and friends inside a local bar, as per the Toronto Sun.

Daley’s post-season came to an end in the Eastern Conference Final when he suffered a broken ankle. His absence tested the depth of the Penguins blue line as the playoffs pressed on, but Pittsburgh was ultimately able to power its way to a championship.

When Sidney Crosby handed off the Stanley Cup, the first player it went to was Daley, whose mother was battling cancer.

“He had been through some different playoffs, but getting hurt at the time he did, knowing how important it was, he had told me that he went [to see] his mom in between series and stuff, she wasn’t doing well, she wanted to see him with the Cup,” said Crosby, as per Sportsnet.

“That was important to her. I think that kind of stuck with me after he told me that. We were motivated to get it for him, even though he had to watch.”

Daley’s mother passed away just over a week later.

Ben Bishop shows off his new Team USA World Cup mask

TAMPA, FL - JUNE 06: Ben Bishop #30 of the Tampa Bay Lightning looks on against the Chicago Blackhawks during Game Two of the 2015 NHL Stanley Cup Final at Amalie Arena on June 6, 2015 in Tampa, Florida.  (Photo by Scott Iskowitz/Getty Images)
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Ben Bishop enjoyed plenty of success during the 2015-16 season and it didn’t go unnoticed. That’s why the veteran was selected to be part of Team USA for this fall’s World Cup of Hockey.

Team USA is loaded in goal, as they’ll be bringing Bishop, Los Angeles’ Jonathan Quick and New Jersey’s Cory Schneider. It’ll be interesting to see how the coaching staff approaches this situation heading into the tournament.

Even if Bishop doesn’t start every game for Team USA, he can still say he has a pretty cool goalie mask for the occasion.

On Saturday, Bishop took to Twitter to show off his new piece of equipment:

That’s a pretty sweet mask!

With arbitration hearing looming, Corrado and Leafs aren’t that far apart

TORONTO, ON - MARCH 5:  Frank Corrado #20 of the Toronto Maple Leafs waits for a puck drop against the Ottawa Senators during an NHL game at the Air Canada Centre on March 5,2016 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Senators defeated the Maple Leafs 3-2. (Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images)
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Frank Corrado should be used to waiting by now. He had to wait 28 games before the Leafs inserted him into the lineup for the first time last season and now he’s waiting for a new contract.

There’s still a gap between the two sides, but it doesn’t appear to be very significant. Corrado and the Leafs will head to arbitration on July 26th unless the two sides can agree to a new deal before then.

According to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman, The Leafs have two different offers on the table. One is a two-way contract, while the other is a one-way deal that would see him make less money if he sticks in the NHL. Corrado is looking for a one-way deal worth $900,000.

Toronto scooped Corrado up off waivers from the Canucks prior to the start of the 2015-16 season. Despite waiting a while to actually hit the ice as a Leaf, Corrado finished the season with one goal, six points and a minus-12 rating in 39 games. He averaged 14:27 of ice time.

Splitting the difference would result in Corrado making roughly $737,500 next season.

The Maple Leafs are also scheduled to go to arbitration with forward Peter Holland (July 25) and defeseman Martin Marincin (Aug. 2).