Ottawa hospital accused of giving Karlsson preferential treatment

27 Comments

A man that brought his ailing mother to The Ottawa Hospital says Erik Karlsson jumped the queue to have surgery on his sliced Achilles tendon.

Vincent Creaco, 48, is accusing the hospital of showing preferential treatment to the Senators defenseman at the expense of other emergency patients — including his 76-year-old mother, who’s systolic blood pressure had spiked to 200, raising concerns of a possible stroke.

Creaco says he and his mother had been at the hospital’s Civic campus since 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 13 and that Karlsson was admitted shortly after midnight, went directly into an urgent care room and was attended to by nurses.

“Even the other people in the [urgent care] room were sort of rolling their eyes,” Creaco told the Ottawa Citizen. “Here comes the hockey star and next thing you know, he gets the attention and doesn’t have to wait and, boom, he’s off to surgery.”

Creaco sent two emails to the hospital’s senior vice-present inquiring about the decision-making process.

It appears the crux of the issue comes down to this:

Like all Canadian hospitals, The Ottawa Hospital follows Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS) guidelines to determine who gets priority for emergency treatment. The scale ranks patients according to five levels, ranging from non-urgent to resuscitation.

Based on the CTAS guidelines, Karlsson’s injury would appear to be more serious than Creaco’s mother’s elevated blood pressure.

Creaco, though, doesn’t see it that way. “I think my mother’s case was more urgent. She could have suffered a stroke. You can’t tell me his Achilles tendon is urgent.”

A Ministry of Health spokesman said a report has been filed regarding the Karlsson incident, but that it would be treated strictly as information and there would be no follow-up investigation.

Brian Morris, a Senators spokesman, said the nature of Karlsson’s injury required immediate attention.

“This was something they needed to do right away. Had any patient had the exact same cut, they would have needed surgery equally fast,” he explained. “They didn’t even take up any hospital resources. They were very cognizant about not doing that.

“It wasn’t like they bumped people from a room to treat Erik.”

This isn’t the first time an NHL team has found itself in the center of a medical queue-jumping controversy.

In January, a report surfaced that Calgary Flames players and their families were directed to lie to cover up getting fast-tracked for H1N1 flut shots in 2009.

A Calgary health nurse said 150 players/family members received the shots at a private clinic while other citizens went through lengthy wait periods to receive the same shots at a public clinic.

Wingels fractures foot, but should be ready for Blackhawks camp

Getty
Leave a comment

The good news is that Tommy Wingels is expected to be ready for Chicago Blackhawks training camp. The bad news is that he’ll be limited in his training regimen … although that very regimen caused him issues in the first place.

Dr. Michael Terry, the Blackhawks’ team doctor, released the following update regarding Wingels:

“Tommy Wingels sustained a left foot fracture during his off-season training. We anticipate a full recovery in six to eight weeks and in time for training camp. We do not anticipate any long-term issues.”

It’s unclear what caused the specific injury. Dropped weight? Unlucky fall? Perhaps a stress fracture? Without knowing the exact issue, it’s tempting to picture various painful scenarios.

(Probably because we’re in the dog days of the hockey summer, too.)

Wingels, 29, is on a one-year deal with Chicago, carrying a $750K salary and cap hit. He last played for the Ottawa Senators, though Blackhawks fans are most likely to remember him from his lengthy stay with the San Jose Sharks.

Six-to-eight weeks seems like it wouldn’t give a ton of room for error, so we’ll see if he’ll actually be ready for training camp.

Dahlin headlines Sweden’s roster for World Junior Summer Showcase

Leave a comment

Defenseman Rasmus Dahlin, potentially the NHL’s first overall draft pick in 2018, will suit up for Sweden at the World Junior Summer Showcase in Plymouth, Michigan.

Dahlin, who doesn’t turn 18 until April, has wowed scouts with his skating and puck-moving ability. At the 2017 World Juniors, he participated as a 16-year-old, garnering tantalizing reviews in the process.

Top-10 picks in the 2017 draft, Elias Pettersson (5th, Vancouver Canucks) and Lias Andersson (7th, New York Rangers), will also be in Plymouth representing Sweden.

Click here for Sweden’s and Finland’s Summer Showcase rosters. The tournament runs from July 29 – Aug. 5 and also features players from the United States and Canada.

Among the draft-eligible Finns to watch is 17-year-old forward Jesse Ylonen, who could be a late first-rounder in 2018.

Related: USA Hockey invites 42 players to World Junior Summer Showcase

All of a sudden, hope for hockey in Houston

Getty
16 Comments

Leslie Alexander’s decision to sell the NBA’s Rockets has revived hope for a hockey team in Houston.

That’s because Alexander is arguably the biggest reason that Houston doesn’t already have a team. The 72-year-old billionaire controls Toyota Center, where the Rockets play. Without getting into all the details, he’s essentially been the only one who could bring an NHL franchise to the city.

From the Houston Press:

But Alexander selling the Rockets (and the lease that goes with it), opens up an NHL-ready hockey arena in Houston. And that’s something that Seattle, which the NHL seemed to favor, can’t offer, and unlike Quebec City, Houston offers up a huge media market with many, many large corporations around to buy up luxury seats.

Houston is certainly a big city. In fact, only four metro areas in the United States — New York, L.A., Chicago and Dallas — have higher populations.

And Houston is growing fast.

Jeremy Jacobs, the influential owner of the Boston Bruins, has not hidden his desire to put an NHL team in Toyota Center. Back in 2015, he told ESPN.com, “I would love to see one in Houston, but we can’t get into that building.”

Perhaps soon the NHL won’t have that impediment.

FanRag’s Cat Silverman wrote extensively about this topic yesterday. To learn more, give it a read.

Predators hire new assistant coach in wake of Housley departure

Leave a comment

The Nashville Predators have hired Dan Muse as an assistant coach.

Muse, who spent the last two years as head coach of the USHL’s Chicago Steel, will be in charge of the Preds’ forwards as well as the penalty kill, while associate head coach Kevin McCarthy  — in the wake of Phil Housley’s departure — will now have responsibility for the defense and the power play.

Muse led the Steel to a championship in May. He also won an NCAA title in 2013 as an assistant coach for Yale.

“Dan comes to us as a successful young coach that brings great energy and passion to the game,” said Preds head coach Peter Laviolette in a statement. “He has worked his way up through the coaching ranks, first winning an NCAA title at Yale in 2013, and then taking a Chicago team that had missed the playoffs eight straight seasons and turned them into the Clark Cup champions in just two seasons. We are excited to welcome him to the organization and look forward to his contributions to the coaching staff.”