Karlsson hurt

Ottawa hospital accused of giving Karlsson preferential treatment

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A man that brought his ailing mother to The Ottawa Hospital says Erik Karlsson jumped the queue to have surgery on his sliced Achilles tendon.

Vincent Creaco, 48, is accusing the hospital of showing preferential treatment to the Senators defenseman at the expense of other emergency patients — including his 76-year-old mother, who’s systolic blood pressure had spiked to 200, raising concerns of a possible stroke.

Creaco says he and his mother had been at the hospital’s Civic campus since 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 13 and that Karlsson was admitted shortly after midnight, went directly into an urgent care room and was attended to by nurses.

“Even the other people in the [urgent care] room were sort of rolling their eyes,” Creaco told the Ottawa Citizen. “Here comes the hockey star and next thing you know, he gets the attention and doesn’t have to wait and, boom, he’s off to surgery.”

Creaco sent two emails to the hospital’s senior vice-present inquiring about the decision-making process.

It appears the crux of the issue comes down to this:

Like all Canadian hospitals, The Ottawa Hospital follows Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS) guidelines to determine who gets priority for emergency treatment. The scale ranks patients according to five levels, ranging from non-urgent to resuscitation.

Based on the CTAS guidelines, Karlsson’s injury would appear to be more serious than Creaco’s mother’s elevated blood pressure.

Creaco, though, doesn’t see it that way. “I think my mother’s case was more urgent. She could have suffered a stroke. You can’t tell me his Achilles tendon is urgent.”

A Ministry of Health spokesman said a report has been filed regarding the Karlsson incident, but that it would be treated strictly as information and there would be no follow-up investigation.

Brian Morris, a Senators spokesman, said the nature of Karlsson’s injury required immediate attention.

“This was something they needed to do right away. Had any patient had the exact same cut, they would have needed surgery equally fast,” he explained. “They didn’t even take up any hospital resources. They were very cognizant about not doing that.

“It wasn’t like they bumped people from a room to treat Erik.”

This isn’t the first time an NHL team has found itself in the center of a medical queue-jumping controversy.

In January, a report surfaced that Calgary Flames players and their families were directed to lie to cover up getting fast-tracked for H1N1 flut shots in 2009.

A Calgary health nurse said 150 players/family members received the shots at a private clinic while other citizens went through lengthy wait periods to receive the same shots at a public clinic.

Vigneault will be behind the Rangers’ bench in 2016-17

New York Rangers coach Alain Vigneault runs a practice at NHL hockey training camp Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, in Greenburgh N.Y. (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)
Associated Press
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The New York Rangers may have been bounced in the opening round of the 2016 playoffs, but they aren’t looking to make a coaching change. In a phone interview with Montreal’s LaPresse newspaper, Alain Vigneault confirmed that he’ll be back behind the Rangers’ bench next season.

“I’ve had discussions with the club’s front office and they told me that they wanted me to come back next season,” Vigneault told LaPresse (quotes have been translated by PHT).

Vigneault and Rangers management will meet in Palm Springs next week to discuss what went wrong in 2015-16.

Even though the season didn’t go the way the Rangers had hoped, Vigneault insists he was never worried about losing his job.

“I don’t really worry about that stuff,” Vigneault said of the rumors surrounding his job security. “There’s 82 games in a season plus the playoffs and you can’t start thinking about your fate after each game. After a loss, you forget it and start thinking about the adjustments you need to make. In regards to our situation, we still managed to pick up 101 points this season. That’s a good season, but we still expected more from our team in the playoffs.”

Like every off-season, there will be changes, but Vigneault isn’t expecting any major ones.

“There’s definitely going to be changes. I don’t know if there’ll be big changes because today, it’s hard to make big changes. With the salary cap, it’s not realistic to think that way.”

When pressed about potential changes, Vigneault wasn’t willing to elaborate.

Vigneault also touched on the way Dan Boyle went after two reporters at the team’s year-end media availability. It’s safe to say he wasn’t thrilled about the way the whole thing went down.

“It’s a lesson for me and our whole team,” added Vigneault. “It’s disappointing because Dan had a really nice career. He won the Stanley Cup with Tampa Bay, but all people will remember him for is this incident. What happened with him really surprised us. It’s too bad. I hope people will remember him for the career he had.”

Here’s your Stanley Cup playoffs schedule for tonight

Stanley Cup
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The Stanley Cup playoffs continue with one game on Friday night. You can catch tonight’s action via the NBC Sports Group’s television and digital platforms.

Tampa Bay at NY Islanders (7:00 p.m. ET)

The TV broadcast of Game 4 will be on NBCSN. To stream the game using the NBC Sports Live Extra app, click here. The Lightning lead the series 2-1.

Here’s some relevant reading material you might enjoy:

No hearings scheduled for Boyle on Hickey hit, or Hickey on Drouin hit

Lightning take dramatic OT win vs. Islanders, go up 2-1 in series

WATCH LIVE: Canada-USA (IIHF World Hockey Championship)

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IIHF.com
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A huge tilt on day one of the World Hockey Championships, as Canada and the USA clash in Russia. You can watch the game online using the NBC Sports Live Extra app.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH LIVE

Canada came away with a gold medal in last year’s tournament while the United States took home the bronze. Of course, each team’s roster changes significantly every year.

The USA’s next game is tomorrow against Belarus. Canada will play Sunday against Hungary.

PHT Morning Skate: Canucks prospect Brock Boeser is taking a girl with Down syndrome to prom

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

–Here’s a feel-good story. Canucks prospect Brock Boeser is taking a girl with Down syndrome to prom. (Sportsnet)

–NBC hockey analyst Pierre McGuire does a lot of traveling during the playoffs. (Sports Illustrated)

–It sounds like ESPN’s Mike Wilbon isn’t a fan of the Coyotes’ latest front office hire. (ESPN)

–Watch the highlights from last night’s game between the Stars and Blues. (Top)

–Former referee Kerry Fraser wants the old charging rule to make a return. (TSN)

–Hockey is becoming more common in the North Carolina Sports Hall-of-Fame. (Charlotte Observer)

–Leafs prospect Mitch Marner’s family home caught fire prior to Game 1 of the OHL final. (Sportsnet)