Jack Parker, 2009 Boston University

Back to Class: Jack Parker calls it a career at Boston University

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We’re taking you “Back To Class” for our roundup of the weekend’s action in college hockey. You can catch Game 1 of the Hockey East quarterfinals between Vermont and Boston College this Friday at 7:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN.

The college hockey world was turned on its ear at the revelation that legendary Boston University coach Jack Parker will be announcing his retirement at a 3 p.m. press conference today.

For the last 40 years, Parker has been a fixture behind the bench on Commonwealth Avenue. He spent two years as an assistant in 1969-70 and 1972-73 before being hired as the head coach midway through the 1973-74 season. He even played hockey at BU for three years as a student. Simply put, Jack Parker is BU hockey.

In that time, he’s taken the Terriers to three national championships (1978, 1995, 2009) and six overall national championship finals (runner-up in 1991, 1994, 1997). His record at BU is the stuff of legends.

894 career wins, a career winning percentage of .694, 12 regular-season titles in the ECAC and Hockey East, 11 conference tournament titles, 21 Beanpot Tournament titles and 24 NCAA tournament appearances. He’s also a Lester Patrick Award winner in 2010. When it comes to hockey in the United States, Boston especially, he’s an icon.

From the countless number of players he’s put in the NHL to members of the 1980 Miracle On Ice team (Jim Craig, Dave Silk, Jack O’Callahan, and Mike Eruzione), Parker’s mark on the game is well pronounced. His 2009 championship team won perhaps the greatest title game ever to be played.

His record as a coach and a leader is almost clear. The blemishes in recent years thanks to two different players (Max Nicastro and Corey Trivino) being accused of sexual assault and shortly thereafter kicked off the team. Their problems led to a probe into what was going on with the program that shined a lascivious light on what was happening off the ice. The report didn’t look kindly on the players and questions over Parker’s control of them arose. The bad seeds are gone, some questions and debate will remain but now the legendary coach is calling it a career.

At 68 years of age, coincidentally his birthday is today, Parker will finish out this season and ride off into the sunset as the king of Boston University hockey. Filling coaching shoes the size of Boston will be almost impossible to do.

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I’ll go quick updating you on the conference tournaments.

source: APWCHA: St. Cloud State and Minnesota finished tied atop the conference to share the McNaughton Cup, but SCSU will be the top seed hosting Alaska-Anchorage in the first round while Minnesota hosts Bemidji State. Other matchups: Michigan Tech goes to North Dakota, Minnesota-Duluth heads to Wisconsin, Colorado College meets up with archrival Denver, and Nebraksa-Omaha takes on Minnesota St. in the battle of Mavericks.

Hockey East: UMass-Lowell locked up their first ever regular season title and the No. 1 spot in the tournament. Their reward? A Maine team that went 2-1-0 against them this year. Other matchups: Vermont faces Boston College, Merrimack faces Parker’s Boston University team at Agganis, and New Hampshire hits the road to face Providence

CCHA: The opening round saw bottom seeded Michigan St upset Alaska in three games while Michigan took out NMU and Bowling Green beating Lake Superior State. Your quarterfinals matchups are: Ferris State heading to Ohio State, Michigan St. taking on top-seeded Miami, Michigan facing Andy Murray’s Western Michigan squad, and Bowling Green taking off to Notre Dame.

ECAC: Dartmouth avoided getting bounced by bottom-seeded Harvard winning Game 3 on Sunday 6-3. That earns them a date in Schenectady against defending champs Union College. Everything else held mostly steady. Cornell heads to Quinnipiac, Brown goes to Troy to face RPI, and St. Lawrence moves on to Yale in the quarters.

Atlantic Hockey: Ho-hum, no first round upsets here as the seeds hold. The quarterfinal pairings see top-seed Niagara hosting RIT, Air Force hosts Canisius, Holy Cross gets Mercyhurst, and Connecticut faces Robert Morris.

Maybe the Leafs didn’t want to trade Phaneuf, but they couldn’t afford to keep him

TORONTO, ON - DECEMEBER 19: Dion Phaneuf #3 of the Toronto Maple Leafs waits for a faceoff against the Phoenix Coyotes during an NHL game at the Air Canada Centre on December 19, 2013 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Leafs defeated the Coyotes 2-1 in an overtime shoot-out. (Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images)
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The conference call was supposed to outline the reasons why Toronto traded its captain, Dion Phaneuf.

But instead, the man that orchestrated the deal — GM Lou Lamoriello — opened with all the reasons why the Leafs would miss him.

“I’ve been extremely impressed with Dion from day one,” Lamoriello explained on Tuesday, shortly after flipping Phaneuf to Ottawa in a blockbuster nine-player deal. “I came in with no preconceived notions, I really didn’t know what to expect other than what was hearsay at different times.

“He’s been impressive in every way whatsoever. And in the phone call I had with him, I expressed that and I meant it sincerely. He’s been a great leader, he’s handled every situation that’s been asked of him, and he’s going to be missed.”

But then, Lamoriello turned to the hard truth.

For as much as the Leafs liked Phaneuf and respected what he’d done in his six-plus seasons with the organization, he just didn’t fit anymore.

Phaneuf, who turns 31 in April, didn’t fit with the rebuild. Assuming the Leafs are two to three years away from being competitive, it’s hard to envision a (successful) blueprint in which a veteran defenseman — one that’s essentially been miscast as a No. 1 since arriving in Toronto — is pushing 35 while the team is on an upswing… while pulling in $7 million annually.

Which brings us to the next thing that didn’t fit in Toronto:

Phaneuf’s contract.

In the second of a seven-year, $49 million deal, Phaneuf would’ve been on Toronto’s books through 2021. That kind of term is an albatross, especially when the likes of Morgan Rielly and Nazem Kadri need new deals by next July, and prized prospects Mitch Marner, William Nylander and Kasperi Kapanen are all due to hit restricted free agency around the same time.

Sens GM Bryan Murray acknowledged as much in his conference call, saying the Phaneuf trade “gives [the Leafs] relief in the latter part of the contract.”

Lamoriello also made mention of that fact, pointing out that a key to the deal was not retaining any of Phaneuf’s salary.

“The length of Dion’s contract and the amount of cap space that is there — where that would put us at a given time, certainly not knowing where the cap will go, this gives us the opportunity to do things,” he said. “It also gives us the opportunity when some of our younger players are coming to the end of their entry-level contracts — who we have high expectations for — to sign them.”

In the end, the deck was just too stacked against Phaneuf.

The GM that acquired him (Brian Burke) and the one that extended him (Dave Nonis) are long gone, and the new regime made no bones about the fact that, for as much as they liked Phaneuf, they didn’t like his contract.

So, off to Ottawa he goes.

“This is a transaction, “Lamoriello said, “that we had no choice with.”

Related: For Sens, Phaneuf brings experience and ‘security on the back end’

For Sens, Phaneuf brings experience and ‘security on the back end’

OTTAWA, CANADA - APRIL 12: Dion Phaneuf #3 of the Toronto Maple Leafs passes the puck against Erik Condra #22 of the Ottawa Senators on April 12, 2014 at Canadian Tire Centre in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.  (Photo by Francois Laplante/FreestylePhoto/Getty Images)
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If it felt like this morning’s Dion Phaneuf trade came out of the blue, well, it kinda did.

According to Senators GM Bryan Murray, talks only got “serious” this past weekend during a phone call with Maple Leafs GM Lou Lamoriello.

“He called me about something else,” said Murray. “I brought up Dion’s name.”

The way the Sens had been playing, it’s no surprise to hear that Murray had been looking for a “little more security on the back end,” as he put it.

“You hear people talk all the time that we’re dreadful in our own end,” he said. “We haven’t been great. We’re getting better. This we believe will be a good addition. It’s about getting an experienced leader, good person, hard-working, competitive guy to add to the mix in our top four.”

Phaneuf is expected to start on the Sens’ second pairing with Cody Ceci. Ottawa’s top d-man, Erik Karlsson, typically skates with Marc Methot.

While Murray called the multi-player deal a “hockey trade,” he conceded there were financial considerations involved.

“It had to work financially for us, as well as for Toronto,” he said. “It gives them relief in the latter part of the contract, I suspect, and it gives us some working pieces to go forward with for the next couple of years.”

What do the Sens expect from Phaneuf?

“Just to be a solid person, player,” said Murray. “Come in and give a little experience to the back end. Play his game the way he plays it.”

“He’ll just bring, we hope, a presence to this organization,” Murray continued. “It appears right now that we’ve got a lot of young guys that are going to be fitted in and playing. Our depth and youth, it’s good. We just needed a little bit of help.”

One thing Murray doesn’t expect?

“We don’t expect him to come in here to be a savior. We expect him to come in here and just be the hockey player that he is.”

Ottawa plays tomorrow in Detroit, where Phaneuf is expected to make his Senators debut.

The Sens and Leafs play March 5 in Toronto.

No hearing scheduled for Abdelkader after Barkov hit

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There’s no disciplinary hearing scheduled for Detroit forward Justin Abdelkader following his big check on Florida’s Aleksander Barkov last night, an NHL spokesman has confirmed.

The incident, which occurred early in the second period, left Barkov woozy and forced him from the game entirely. Abdelkader wasn’t penalized on the play — that, along with the hit itself, infuriated the Panthers and head coach Gerard Gallant.

“It was a cheap hit, I don’t know how the ref didn’t call it,” Nick Bjugstad told the Miami Herald.

“I thought it was a cheap shot but the referees didn’t see it that way,” Gallant added, noting that Abdelkader “left his feet a little and got [Barkov] in the jaw.”

Abdelkader has run afoul of the Department of Player Safety before. He was suspended two games during the ’13 playoffs for a hit on then-Ducks defenseman Toni Lydman.

The Panthers are back in action tonight, as they take on the Sabres in Buffalo.

Detroit doesn’t play again until Wednesday, when it hosts the Sens at Joe Louis.

Dion Phaneuf traded to Senators

LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 07:  Jordan Nolan #71 of the Los Angeles Kings is knocked off balance by Dion Phaneuf #3 of the Toronto Maple Leafs during the second period at Staples Center on January 7, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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And this is why we listen when Bob McKenzie says something.

The Ottawa Senators have acquired defenseman Dion Phaneuf, forwards Matt Frattin, Casey Bailey, and Ryan Rupert and undrafted defensive prospect Cody Donaghey from the Toronto Maple Leafs in exchange for defenseman Jared Cowen, forwards Colin Greening, Milan Michalek and Tobias Lindberg, plus Ottawa’s second-round pick in the 2017 draft.

No salary will be retained by either team.

From the Leafs’ perspective, the trade provides even more cap flexibility for their rebuild. Phaneuf is signed through 2020-21 for a cap hit of $7 million; he’s entirely on Ottawa’s books now. As for the guys coming to Toronto, Michalek, Cowen, and Greening are only under contract through next season, for a combined cap hit of around $10 million. And according to the Ottawa Sun’s Bruce Garrioch, both Cowen and Greening could be bought out by the Leafs this offseason.

The Sens, meanwhile, get to add a workhorse defenseman to a blue line that already includes Erik Karlsson. Plus, they rid themselves of some onerous contracts.