NHL Draft lottery set for Apr. 29, all non-playoff teams eligible for No. 1 pick


On Monday, the NHL announced that its annual draft lottery would be held on Monday, Apr. 29 — and that, for the first time in history, all 14 non-playoff teams would have a shot at winning the first overall selection.

Here are the details:

The NHL Draft Lottery is a weighted system to determine the order of selection for the first 14 picks of the 2013 NHL Draft. Teams finishing with the fewest points during the regular season possess the greatest chance of winning the right to the first pick.

Fourteen balls, numbered 1 to 14, are placed in a lottery machine. The machine expels four balls, forming a series of numbers. The four-digit series resulting from the expulsion of the balls is matched against a probability chart that divides the possible combinations among the 14 participating clubs.

While the top pick can now go to any of the 14 non-playoff clubs, or the team owning the rights to the first pick of a non-playoff club, the odds of winning the lottery are unchanged from previous years.

The teams in the drawing are ranked in inverse order of their regular season point totals, with team one being the club with the fewest points, and team 14 being the club with the most points among those outside of the playoffs.

And here are the likelihoods (in percentages) of each team getting the first pick:

Team 1 — 25.0%
Team 2 — 18.8%
Team 3 — 14.2%
Team 4 — 10.7%
Team 5 — 8.1%
Team 6 — 6.2%
Team 7 — 4.7%
Team 8 — 3.6%
Team 9 — 2.7%
Team 10 — 2.1%
Team 11 — 1.5%
Team 12 — 1.1%
Team 13 — 0.8%
Team 14 — 0.5%


— The 2013 NHL Entry Draft will be held on Sunday, July 30 at the Prudential Center in New Jersey starting at 3 p.m. ET.

— No club will move down more than one position as a result of the lottery.

— The remaining first-round positions are determined by Stanley Cup Playoffs results.

Report: Anders Lindback will join injury-riddled Kings

GLENDALE, AZ - DECEMBER 17:  Goaltender Anders Lindback #29 of the Arizona Coyotes in action during the NHL game against the Columbus Blue Jackets at Gila River Arena on December 17, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.  The Blue Jackets defeated the Coyotes 7-5.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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The Los Angeles Kings have reportedly found a goalie to fill in for Jonathan Quick and Jeff Zatkoff.

According to a report out of Sweden, Anders Lindback will be joining the Kings on a “short-term contract”.

Lindback spent training camp with the New Jersey Devils, where he played well, but the team ultimately decided to stick with Cory Schneider and Keith Kinkaid.

If you count the PTO with the Devils, this will be his seventh team in the last six seasons.

The 28-year-old spent the 2015-16 campaign with the Arizona Coyotes. He had a 5-7-1 record with a 3.11 goals-against-average and a .894 save percentage in 19 appearances.

This isn’t a long-term solution for the Kings, but at least it’s an affordable one.


Kings expect Quick to miss about three months

Zatkoff injures groin during morning skate

PHT Morning Skate: Mike Commodore had an interesting shift as an Uber driver


PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

–Former NHL defenseman Mike Commodore took a shift as an Uber driver and it sounds like he had a good time. (TSN)

–Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith now has his own cereal and it’s called “Keith Krunch”. (The Athletic)

Pavel Datsyuk‘s hands are still magic. (Top)

–Capitals rookie Zach Sanford is still getting used to life in the NHL. (Washington Post)

–Seven goalies the Los Angeles Kings might be able to trade for. (Sportsnet)

–The Detroit Red Wings helped Blue Jackets rookie Zach Werenski fall in love with hockey. (Columbus Dispatch)

Even the Flames’ struggling power play capitalized against the Blackhawks’ struggling penalty kill


The Calgary Flames had the league’s worst power play at just four per cent coming into Monday’s game against Chicago.

Yeah. Awful.

The Blackhawks had the league’s worst penalty kill at just 42.9 per cent, which is also awful, although their issues go deeper than that aspect.

So, of course special teams played an important role in this game. Despite their previous struggles with the advantage, the Flames scored twice on the power play, on goals from Sam Bennett and Sean Monahan, taking their turn capitalizing on Chicago’s early-season difficulties short handed.

The Flames finished two-for-five on the power play, giving them three power play goals in 30 opportunities so far. They jumped all the way to 27th in the league in that category (!!) at 10 per cent. The Blackhawks have given up 14 power play goals against on 26 chances.

“We’ve got to get that out of our game,” Jonathan Toews told CSN Chicago. “As I’ve been saying, the penalty kill usually translates from our effort 5-on-5 and if we’re not starting games well, then we’re getting behind. Obviously [we’re] giving up power plays to begin with and we’re not killing the penalty kills that we’re on. Unfortunate to get behind again tonight.”

This is not the company you’d expect the Blackhawks to be keeping.

The Blackhawks did come back to force overtime, but they ultimately lost 3-2 in the shootout.

Former Blackhawk Kris Versteeg scored the only goal in the deciding breakaway contest, giving Calgary the win.

While the Flames power play came alive for this game, the play of goalie Brian Elliott was significant.

He, too, had struggled mightily with three losses in three starts, and a .839 save percentage, prompting his former teammate Jake Allen to say Flames fans shouldn’t be worried about Elliott despite his dreadful start.

Against Chicago, Elliott made 31 saves on 33 shots and then made five saves in the seven-round shootout.

The Habs took a chance signing Radulov and (so far) they’ve been rewarded

MONTREAL, QC - OCTOBER 20:  Alexander Radulov #47 of the Montreal Canadiens looks on during the NHL game against the Arizona Coyotes at the Bell Centre on October 20, 2016 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.  The Montreal Canadiens defeated the Arizona Coyotes 5-2.  (Photo by Minas Panagiotakis/Getty Images)

The Montreal Canadiens took a chance on Alexander Radulov.

The cost? One year at $5.75 million, which is a significant investment for a 30-year-old player with plenty of talent but past off-ice discipline issues. So far, Radulov has been a welcomed addition to a Habs lineup that needed a skilled forward capable of putting up good numbers and taking a top-six role.

The success — or lack of — for the Habs will always focus around the play and health of goalie Carey Price.

But Radulov is off to a nice start to the season, which should provide some optimism for Canadiens fans after a disappointing 2015-16 season and the tumultuous summer that followed.

He entered Monday’s game against the Philadelphia Flyers with two points in five games, but had solid puck possession numbers. Against the Flyers, he was once again a central figure for the Habs on the attack.

And the production followed.

He had a three-point night, setting up Shea Weber‘s goal in the second period — Weber’s slap shot busted the stick of Brayden Schenn and still had enough to get by goalie Steve Mason — and Brendan Gallagher for the eventual winner late in the third period.

Radulov then secured the win with an empty-net goal, giving him five points in six games. The Habs, following their 3-1 win over the Flyers, remain the only team in the league without a regulation loss.

Radulov entered the season as a potential X-factor for the Habs.

General manager Marc Bergevin received plenty of criticism for trading P.K. Subban. But so far, the returns from signing Radulov have been promising for the Habs.