Nicklas Lidstrom

PHT’s Pressing Questions: How will Detroit adjust to life without Lidstrom?


Every day until the season starts we’ll explore an intriguing storyline for the upcoming year.

For the first time since 1991, the Red Wings will open the season without Nicklas Lidstrom on the roster.

Just think about that for a minute.

The last time Detroit had a Lidstrom-less roster, John Ziegler was the NHL commissioner and Dan Quayle was the Vice President. Nirvana released Nevermind. Tim Berners-Lee built the first-ever website, and Dances With Wolves won Best Picture.

Yeah. Long time ago.

How Detroit adjusts to life without Lidstrom remains to be seen, but the general consensus is it’s going to be tough.

At his peak, Lidstrom was the best defenseman in hockey. In his decline, he was still a vital cog. Last year, at 41, he finished second among Wings rearguards in scoring (34 points) and played 23 minutes a game — this despite being hobbled by a foot injury that cost him 12 games.

He was also the team’s undisputed leader.

After inheriting the “C” from Steve Yzerman in 2006, Lidstrom led an amazing stretch of hockey — Detroit went 294-114-60 in the regular season under his captaincy and made two Stanley Cup finals, winning once.

Now he’s gone.

So, what lies ahead?

Many within the Wings organization have offered up “no replacing Nick” platitudes, which are boring but fair. There is no replacing him.

Yet Lidstrom’s departure has a wrinkle to it. Since the last lockout, the Wings have lost vital pieces — Yzerman, Brendan Shanahan, Chris Chelios, Kris Draper, Kirk Maltby — but also acquired them.

GM Ken Holland has been aggressive in replenishing talent via free agency and trades: Dominik Hasek, Brian Rafalski, Todd Bertuzzi and Marian Hossa, to name a few.

This year? Lidstrom leaves, and the response is…Carlo Colaiacovo.

Yes, it’s unfair linking Colaiacovo to Lidstrom — he of the seven Norris Trophies, four Stanley Cups and a Conn Smythe — but that’s the nature of the beast.

To his credit, Holland tried to go big. He reportedly offered Ryan Suter a 13-year, $90 million deal to sign in Motown, but Suter opted for Minnesota.

So Colaiacovo ended up as Detroit’s lone defensive acquisition and, as such, had to field the requisite Lidstrom questions — even if everybody already knew the answers.

“I just want to be straightforward: I’m no Nick Lidstrom, but I think I’m a good complement to what they have there,” he told USA Today. “I just want to come in and be the guy that can help in any way possible.”

Oh, and for those thinking a shortened season has left the door juuuust slightly open for a Lidstrom comeback — sorry.

It’s not going to happen.

According to Swedish news outlet Sportbladet, head coach Mike Babcock already looked into that option on Tuesday.

From Google Translate:

“Yes, [Babcock] called yesterday and asked if I was keen to come over and play. But I said I’m pretty happy with life and my decision from last spring,” says ‘Lidas’ to Sportbladet.

“We talked yesterday and the question was whether I was eager to play again. He wondered if his wife was tired of being at home all the time. But she has not tired of me, not yet anyway, haha. Comeback is not an issue,” says Lidstrom.

So with all the great unknowns in Detroit, the one thing everybody knows is perhaps most worrisome of all:

Whenever the season starts, No. 5 won’t be there.

Kane scores OT-winner, caps Islanders’ bumpy start in Brooklyn

Patrick Kane

On paper, it’s the perfect way to kick off meaningful hockey in Brooklyn, as the New York Islanders faced the defending champion Chicago Blackhawks on Friday.

In reality, there were some highs and lows, culminating with Patrick Kane scoring a power-play overtime-winner to give Chicago a 3-2 (OT) win.

The Barclays Center crowd was going to be a big part of the story one way or another, but even by building-opening standards, the audience made some waves.

Indeed, Kane was greeted with some jeers during his first road appearance of the 2015-16 season, though he didn’t sound surprised.

(There were other controversial chants, apparently.)

Speaking of the crowd, it may not have been the greatest turnout:

ESPN goes way, way in depth on how the change of locale was received, by the way.

It wasn’t a perfect night inside the rink, either, as there weren’t exactly rave reviews about ice quality. New York Newsday’s Arthur Staple compared the ice to a “slushy” and “soup,” with an anonymous Islander (or Islanders) describing the conditions as “awful.”

Kane was pretty diplomatic about it, for what it’s worth.


So, no, it was not a perfect night for the Islanders.

They probably envisioned a teeming, perfectly mannered crowd. Management likely expected Jaroslav Halak to be in net, too.

Sometimes breaking ground is often about overcoming those early stumbles, though, and maybe the best review is to parallel the on-ice results: the Isles at least got a point out of it.

Let’s not forget that there are some cool perks that come with this situation, even if the specifics may vary.

If you want even more information/photos/etc., you’d probably do well to check out #IslesOpeningNight.

Columbus collapse: Rangers spoil Blue Jackets’ opener

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For a little more than a minute, Brandon Saad was going to be the story of the Columbus Blue Jackets’ opener. Instead, his power-play goal merely got the ball rolling on a flabbergasting finish.

The New York Rangers scored three goals in 1:17 of game time to manage a 4-2 win.

They’ve now spoiled home openers for the Chicago Blackhawks and Columbus Blue Jackets to begin their 2015-16 season.

It might be easiest just to show you when the goals were scored, noting that the third period began with a 1-1 tie.

Brandon Saad power-play goal: 16:10 into third period (2-1 Columbus)
Oscar Lindberg: 17:24 (2-2 tie)
Kevin Hayes: 17:41 (3-2 Rangers)
Mats Zuccarello: 18:41 (4-2 Rangers)

Yikes. Zuccarello scored two of the Rangers’ goals, while a beauty by Cam Atkinson is likely long forgotten.