Winners, losers of the NHL lockout

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Now that the NHL’s latest work stoppage has ended, it’s time for the part everybody loves: Identifying the losers!

(Fine, we’ll identify some winners as well.)

For the record, we all know fans are losers in any lockout, so that kind of goes without saying for this piece. OK?

Winner: Owners

Regardless of what concessions were made to the NHLPA late in negotiations, owners managed to get a 50-50 hockey-related revenue split after receiving just 43 percent in the last CBA.

According to USA Today, that seven percent increase works out to an additional $231 million per season.

Loser: “Hard-line” Owners

Three in particular took major PR hits.

Boston’s Jeremy Jacobs was identified as a “hard-liner” early in the process and saw his name appear on numerous occasions in a less than glowing light (see here and here and here).

Minnesota’s Craig Leipold, another “hard-liner,” was accused of negotiating in bad faithby his own player.

San Jose’s Logan Couture took things a step further, saying that Jacobs, Leipold and Calgary’s Murray Edwards weren’t exactly winning over players with personality and charm in meetings.

“They’re hard-line guys,” Couture said. “They don’t give you the time of day, and they barely even look at you.

“They’re there for one reason, and that’s to help their teams make money.”

Of course, it’s doubtful any of the three really care. They’re rich.

Winner: Players…after they retire

The NHLPA walked away from negotiations boasting of a shiny new pension plan.

“I don’t think there’s any doubt the pension is the centerpiece of this deal for the players,” said Winnipeg Jets defenseman Ron Hainsey. “That’s not the only thing. There are other things that we were able to hold onto as far as free agency age, arbitration rights.

“But as far as the centerpiece that the players are going to be able to rally around and be proud of, I would say the pension.”

Loser: Players…playing right now

Going from 57 to 50 percent on HRR was a loss. Going from unlimited to an eight-year maximum on contract length was a loss. Pragmatically, having the salary cap drop to $64.3 million in year two was a loss — that could put a major squeeze on unrestricted free agents in 2013-14.

Players also lost a half-season’s worth of paychecks, and the respect of some fans after the ill-conceived “Puck Gary” hats and #LockoutProblems Twitter hashtag.

Winner: Scot L. Beckenbaugh

An instrumental figure in helping the NFL and NFL Referees Association broker their labor deal, Beckenbaugh — Deputy Director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Services — was a key figure in helping the NHL and NHLPA work things out, engineering the 16-hour marathon session that eventually ended the lockout.

Beckenbaugh was hailed as for his “extraordinary contribution” by FCMS boss George H. Cohen and received high praise from a number of NHL players.

“Scot Beckenbaugh, next time I’m in NYC, dinner is on me,” Edmonton Oilers center Sam Gagner said on Twitter. “Thanks for helping get us back on the ice.”

Loser: Guy Serota

See here and here.

Winner: John Tavares

Few players enjoyed more European success than the Isles youngster. He signed on with Switzerland’s SC Bern early in the process, played a lot of games (28) racked up a ton of points (42, fourth in Swiss league scoring) and scored four points in four games en route to winning the Spengler Cup with Team Canada.

Outside of his brush with cannibalism, Tavares also managed to avoid injury. In all, a solid lockout.

Loser: Evander Kane

Let’s see…

He signed with KHL Dinamo Minsk, only to be ripped by the head coach for being out of shape.

He left Dinamo after a 12-game stint that included one goal, zero assists, a minus-8 rating, 47 penalty minutes and a one-game suspension for a head-shot.

Upon leaving, he criticized the coaching — “you play six minutes a night and they want you to score three goals a game” — then headed back to North America, where he landed squarely in the “calling Floyd Mayweather Jr. on my money phone” picture flap.

Winner: Donald Fehr

He deftly handled public/media criticism. He maintained a calm, cool demeanor throughout the process (made even more apparent when his adversary, Gary Bettman, was visibly irate following the Dec. 6 debacle.) He fought the owners on a number of key issues and — most importantly — he got the players a better deal than most expected.

“There’s no doubt in my mind Don Fehr saved this union, saved the game,” said Florida forward George Parros. “He was a thorn in their side, I think, a bit, but what he did I think was incredible.”

McPhee says Golden Knights ‘accomplished a lot of things’ in first draft

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No team was busier at the NHL draft this weekend than the expansion Vegas Golden Knights.

Armed with 13 draft picks thanks to their dealings in the expansion draft, the Golden Knights began the process of building the real future of their team. It started on Friday night when they kept all three of their first-round selections and used them to select a pair of centers along with a puck-moving defenseman. They continued the process on Saturday with the remainder of their picks.

A quick look at the selections indicates McPhee tried to begin by building his roster down the middle by selecting six centers, two defensemen and a pair of goalies.

“We accomplished a lot of things in this draft,” McPhee said, via Steve Carp of the Las Vegas Review Journal. “We got some skill, we got some size and we got some goaltending.”

Their entire draft haul ended up as follows

1 (6) — Cody Glass, center

1 (13) — Nick Suzuki, center

1 (15) — Erik Brannstrom, defense

2 (34) — Nicolas Hague, defense

2 (31) — Jake Leschyshyn, center

3 (65) — Jonas Rondbjerg, right wing

4 (96) — Maksim Zhukov, goalie

5 (127) — Lucas Elvenes, center/right wing

5 (142) — Jonathan Dugan, left wing

6 (158) — Nick Campoli, center

6 (161) — Jiri Patera, goalie

7 (189) — Ben Jones, center

Along with those picks, they also traded one of their second-round picks (No. 45 overall) to the Columbus Blue Jackets in exchange for prospect Keegan Kolesar, a 6-2, 223-point forward that is ready to make the jump to pro hockey after averaging a point-per-game the past two seasons in the Western Hockey League.

Size did seem to be a common trend with their picks as eight of their selections were listed as 6′ or taller, including Hague, a 6-5, 207-pound defenseman.

While the inaugural Golden Knights roster will be made up primarily of players taken in the expansion draft this past week, most of them will not be with the team for more than a year or two as the organization begins to take shape.

Some of them probably will not even begin the season on the team as McPhee continues to wheel and deal.

This weekend is where the real building of the organization started.

Treliving: Flames paid price in Hamonic deal, but ‘you can never have enough top d-men’

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Two years ago, Brad Treliving acquired Dougie Hamilton at the draft. On Saturday, he picked up Travis Hamonic from the New York Islanders.

Those are two moves that have significantly helped the Flames build a formidable top-four defense in the Western Conference, and it’s already been suggested it could be in the conversation with Nashville’s group that includes Ryan Ellis, P.K. Subban, Roman Josi and Mattias Ekholm.

Yes, the Flames paid a price — first and second-round picks in next year’s NHL Draft and a second-round pick in either the 2019 or 2020 NHL Draft.

But after making the playoffs this season and then making a recent trade with Arizona to acquire goalie Mike Smith, the Flames seem to feel they’re in their window to win now. Today’s move further solidifies that notion.

“You’ve got to give to get,” said Treliving, the Flames general manager, of the Hamonic deal. “You hate paying the price. But we looked at a lot of things: We looked at the makeup of our team, where he fits. He’s a right shot. We think he fits in real good with our team.

“I like the looks of our top-four. He moves pucks. He’s a character kid. He’s got some bite to him.”

The Flames now have their top four defensemen locked into contracts through at least 2020, which was one of the important factors in acquiring Hamonic, according to Treliving. Mark Giordano, who turns 34 in October, is signed through 2022 and Hamilton is signed through 2021.

Treliving lauded the puck-moving ability of Giordano, Hamilton and T.J. Brodie — who combined for 31 goals and 125 points, led by Hamilton’s 13-goal, 50-point campaign. But, he said, the move to acquire Hamonic brings added toughness and versatility into the group.

“He checks a lot of boxes for us,” he said. “I think you build up through the middle. This, to me, solidifies our defense. I like our center ice position. There’s depth there and we’ll keep tweaking at it, but I like the looks of that defense.”

As a result of injuries, Hamonic played in only 49 games last season.

With the way Hamonic plays, Treliving admitted there may be greater risk for injury, but the Flames don’t have any concerns about that heading into next season.

The Flames also have some young, up-and-coming defensemen in their system, most notably 20-year-old prospect Oliver Kylington, who fell to 60th overall in 2015, even though there was talk he could be a first-round pick.

“I think we’ve got some young kids coming. It allows them to progress and develop at their own timeline,” said Treliving. “But you can never have enough defensemen. You can never have enough top defensemen.”

Snow open to trading picks, prospects to improve roster now

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CHICAGO — Garth Snow may not be done dealing.

After trading defenseman Travis Hamonic to Calgary, the New York Islanders’ general manager said the return from the Flames could be used as “currency” to bolster the roster.

The Isles received a first-round pick in 2018 and a second-round pick in 2018, plus other considerations, for Hamonic.

“I don’t envision anything happening here in the next two days, though that could always change,” said Snow. “We feel we have a good hockey team. We have a team that’s built for now and for the future. I mean, you look at our prospects and the draft picks, we also have the ability to use some of those assets to bring in a player that can improve our club in the near term.”

Snow has reportedly had his eye on Colorado forward Matt Duchene, but so far has been unable to make a deal with the Avalanche.

As for trading Hamonic, Snow said it was made more palatable by the “great depth” the Isles have got on the back end.

That said, it was a tough, emotional decision.

“I think the world of him, on and off the ice,” Snow said of Hamonic. “Just a first-class player and first-class person.”

Snow would not divulge if the move was related to Hamonic’s trade request from 2015.

“I think he’s in a good place to play for his family, and the Islanders got a solid return,” said Snow. “I think it’s a win-win for both teams.”

Report: Rangers to hire Lindy Ruff as an assistant coach

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More coaching news on Saturday.

Lindy Ruff’s time with the Dallas Stars ended in April following a disappointing regular season, but it appears he’s found another coaching gig in the NHL.

It is, however, a different role than what he’s been used to for the past 20 years.

Per Larry Brooks of the New York Post, a deal has not been done yet, however, Ruff will join the Rangers as an assistant coach on Alain Vigneault’s staff. He’ll reportedly replace Jeff Beukeboom and will be in charge of New York’s defense.

Ruff certainly brings experience, with 1,165 games coached in the NHL. He’s been a head coach since 1997 when he joined the Buffalo Sabres, and hasn’t been an assistant since a four-year tenure with the Florida Panthers from 1993 to 1997.

The Rangers’ defense has undergone notable changes this offseason, with Dan Girardi getting bought out of his six-year, $33 million contract. With about $20 million now in cap space, New York may not be done making moves to their blue line this offseason.

The Rangers made a blockbuster trade with the Coyotes on Friday, sending Derek Stepan and Antti Raanta to the Coyotes in exchange for the seventh overall pick and 21-year-old defenseman Anthony DeAngelo.