Roberto Luongo

Luongo on possibility of playing in Toronto: “It’s something I can handle”

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Where will Roberto Luongo be traded? What will Roberto Luongo be traded for? Wait…will Roberto Luongo even be traded?

The questions are plentiful; the answers at this point, not so much.

Such is the level of interest among Maple Leafs fans that the Toronto Sun sent a reporter to Coral Springs, Florida, where Luongo was practicing today (in a Canucks jersey) with goalie coach Francois Allaire.

The idea that Luongo would be scared to go to a hockey-mad market like Toronto has always seemed laughable to us. The 33-year-old has started the two highest-pressure games that exist – he won the gold-medal game for Canada in 2010; he lost Game 7 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals for Vancouver. Call him a choker all you want — he’s had nightmare outings — but most goalies don’t even get the opportunity to choke in big games because they’re not good enough to get to them.

Meanwhile, in Toronto, Leafs coach Randy Carlyle was asked about his current net-minding tandem of James Reimer and Ben Scrivens.

“We have NHL caliber goaltending,” said Carlyle, echoing GM Brian Burke’s past statements on the issue.

Meanwhile, in Vancouver, Canucks GM Mike Gillis was asked Sunday about his Luongo conundrum.

Predictably, Gillis wasn’t willing to say much: “Until (the CBA) gets ratified we are not talking trade with any other teams. We’re not going to do anything until we see a collective agreement that’s ratified, that’s approved by the players and ratified by the owners. At that point, we’ll begin to move forward on a variety of different fronts we’ve been thinking about.”

Gillis has said in the past that he’s more than willing to keep Luongo and have him share the goaltending load with Cory Schneider. Which would be…interesting.

“I’m open to a lot of ideas right now,” Luongo said. “I don’t want to corner myself, especially since I might have to start the season in Vancouver or play the whole season there. Who knows.”

He added: ““I’m prepared right now to go up to Vancouver and start training camp. Unless Mike tells me otherwise, I’m ready to go, I’m excited. I miss being around the guys.”

As for other possible destinations:

—- Florida. Believed to be Luongo’s first choice for family reasons. The Canucks have reportedly expressed interest in Panthers prospect Nick Bjugstad. This makes sense, as Bjugstad is a very good prospect. Probably too good for the Panthers to give up.

—- Columbus. In case you missed it, the Blue Jackets struggled between the pipes last season. But would Luongo waive his no-trade clause to go to Columbus? (No offense to Columbus.)

—- Chicago. Can you imagine? Whatever Blackhawks fans may think of it, Luongo gives their team a better chance to win than Corey Crawford.

—- Edmonton. Even if the Oilers were interested, would Vancouver management consider trading Luongo to a division rival? Especially a division rival that’s on its way to becoming an elite team.

Coyotes’ defensive makeover continues with Luke Schenn signing

SAN JOSE, CA - APRIL 20:  Luke Schenn #52 of the Los Angeles Kings in action against the San Jose Sharks in Game Four of the Western Conference First Round during the NHL 2016 Stanley Cup Playoffs at SAP Center on April 20, 2016 in San Jose, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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While Brayden Schenn hopes to hammer out a favorable deal with the Philadelphia Flyers, his brother Luke Schenn inked a two-year contract with the Arizona Coyotes on Saturday.

Arizona didn’t confirm these details, but the cap hit looks to be $1.25 million, according to reporters including Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman.

“We are very pleased to sign Luke to a two-year contract,” New Coyotes GM John Chayka said. “He’s a good, young defenseman and we feel we can optimize his performance here. He will be a solid addition to our blue line.”

Chayka is making some significant changes to the Coyotes’ blueline, even if Oliver Ekman-Larsson is still the star of that group.

The Coyotes traded for and then signed Alex Goligoski. They possibly grabbed a falling star in the draft, too, as they selected Jacob Chychrun. Adding Schenn might not be the last move, either.

Schenn isn’t necessarily an analytics darling, but a two-year, $2.5 million deal is reasonable even with some flaws. This contract seems even more reasonable when you consider the five-year, $18 million deal that just expired.

Report: Maple Leafs, Holland are about $1M apart

TORONTO, ON - APRIL 11: Peter Holland #24 of the Toronto Maple Leafs skates up the ice during NHL action against the Montreal Canadiens at the Air Canada Centre April 11, 2015 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  (Photo by Abelimages/Getty Images)
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Peter Holland‘s submitted salary request for arbitration is reportedly more than double what the Toronto Maple Leafs proposed.

With that in mind, Monday’s pending hearing serves as a challenging deadline.

Holland’s asking for $2.1 million in 2016-17 while Toronto is offering $900K, according to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman.

This comes a day after the Maple Leafs placed Holland on waivers, advancing the argument that he’d be worthy of a two-way deal. He cleared waivers today.

Granted, the Globe & Mail’s James Mirtle wonders if Holland would clear waivers under normal circumstances:

Holland is a solid player, generating 27 points in 65 games with Toronto last season. He’s a nice enough piece, but with the Maple Leafs in rebuild mode, they’re not exactly anxious to pay supporting cast members more than necessary.

With such a context in mind, it should be intriguing to see how much either side will budge.

At the moment, the Maple Leafs seem to hold the advantage.

Report: Flyers, Schenn disagree on money, term with arbitration looming

PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 22:  Brayden Schenn #10 of the Philadelphia Flyers celebrates his goal in the second period against the New York Rangers on April 7, 2015 at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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It sounds like the Philadelphia Flyers have some work to do if they hope to avoid an arbitration hearing with Brayden Schenn.

The session would take place on Monday, so the clock is ticking.

While the differences in opinion aren’t outright enormous, the Flyers still need to clean up their cap situation, so every $1 million counts. That – plus the length of a deal – seem to be the issue for the 24-year-old forward and the Flyers, according to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman:

With the Flyers aiming for a two-year agreement while Schenn just wants one, it’s not quite as simple as merely saying “split the difference.”

Then again, that general logic could prove helpful. Perhaps the best path to a deal would be for the Flyers to edge closer to $5.5 million while convincing Schenn to sign for two years rather than one?

Of course, the Flyers could also offer Schenn more security in exchange for giving up some UFA years:

The physical forward really started to show why he was the fifth pick of the 2009 NHL Draft last season, setting career-highs in goals (26), assists (33) and points (59).

He’s coming off of a two-year, $5 million contract, so Schenn can take heart in realizing he’s heading toward a healthy raise even if he doesn’t get everything he’s asking for.

Wild, Schroeder settle on two-way deal

UNIONDALE, NY - MARCH 24: Jordan Schroeder #10 of the Minnesota Wild skates against the New York Islanders at the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum on March 24, 2015 in Uniondale, New York. The Wild defeated teh Islanders 2-1 in the shootout.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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Jordan Schroeder might be a depth player for the Minnesota Wild – at least when he’s with the big club – yet his situation provided a decent dollop of drama.

The two sides avoided salary arbitration by settling on a deal on Saturday, but not before the Wild “sent a message” by putting him on waivers.

That message was received, as Schroeder’s one-year contract is a two-way deal.

CBC’s Tim Wharnsby has the details regarding how the salary works out:

Schroeder has 107 regular season games under his belt, yet he’s played more games with the Iowa Wild than the Minnesota Wild since joining the organization.

He might not like it, but a two-way deal makes sense considering his standing with the team.

Granted, there’s the outside chance he’ll flourish under Bruce Boudreau; Schroeder is still just 25 and was the 22nd pick of the 2009 NHL Draft.

If he unexpectedly blossoms, he’d have a lot more leverage next time around.