“Journeyman” leads list of holiday hockey books


A book makes for a great Christmas gift. It’s super easy to buy, doesn’t take long to wrap, and when the person’s finished with it you can read it too.

Here are four hockey books that people are talking about this holiday season:

Journeyman: The Many Triumphs (and Even More Numerous Defeats) of a Guy Who’s Seen Just About Everything in the Game of Hockey, by Sean Pronger (with Sportsnet’s Dan Murphy) – Perhaps best known as Chris’s brother, Sean never became a star. He played in the NHL, AHL, IHL, ECHL before finishing his career in Germany. He also once told Wayne Gretzky to not pass him the puck during practice because he was too hungover. The Great One then passed him the puck a lot. “If there is just one hockey book you buy this holiday season,” the Globe and Mail says Journeyman should be it. (PHT review: Haven’t read it.)

The Instigator: How Gary Bettman Remade the NHL and Changed the Game Forever by Jonathon Gatehouse – For those who can’t get enough of the lockout, here’s an in-depth look at the man who’s been commissioner for three work stoppages. The Winnipeg Free Press calls it “a crisply written, carefully researched and thought-provoking biography about a sports icon neither beloved nor athletic but who’s arguably the most powerful figure pro hockey has ever known.” (PHT review: Haven’t read it.)

J.R.: My Life as the Most Outspoken, Fearless, and Hard-Hitting Man in Hockey by Jeremy Roenick (with USA Today’s Kevin Allen) – One of the greatest American hockey players ever, Roenick is known for much more than scoring 1,216 points in 1,363 games. Patrick Marleau did not care for this book. (PHT review: Haven’t read it.)

The Best of Down Goes Brown by Sean McIndoe – Hockey’s most popular humorist besides Scott Howson has written his first book. With chapters like “A moment with the guy who has to go out and fix the glass when it breaks” and “An NHLer’s guide to never saying anything interesting,” Amazon commenter Christopher L Hoffman says, “If you love either Sean or hockey, you might kinda like this book.” The book also features forewords by TSN’s James Duthie and Bob McKenzie, but not Darren Dreger. (PHT review: Haven’t read it.)

Kings grab goalie insurance by signing Budaj

LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Jhonas Enroth #1 and Peter Budaj #31 of the Los Angeles Kings stretch before a game against the Arizona Coyotes at STAPLES Center on September 22, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NHLI via Getty Images)
via Los Angeles Kings
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In slightly less interesting Los Angeles Kings news than the latest in the Mike Richards fiasco, the team handed Peter Budaj a one-year, two-way deal on Friday.

The veteran goalie’s contract pays $575K on the NHL level and $100K in the AHL (though it’s $150K guaranteed), according to Hockey’s Cap.

At the moment, it sounds like Budaj will be third on the Kings’ goalie depth chart. That says as much about how things have been going lately for Los Angeles than Budaj’s work on a PTO.

As noted above, one of the more significant moves in Budaj’s favor came when the New York Islanders claimed Jean-Francois Berube off of waivers this week.

The Kings actually waived Budaj before signing him, so this has to be a relief to a goalie with a fairly robust resume as a backup.

All apologies to Budaj, but it’s probably true that the Kings would prefer not to see him at the NHL level very often in 2015-16.

Kings, NHLPA announce settlement in Richards grievance

Los Angeles Kings v New York Rangers

The Los Angeles Kings announced today that they have “reached an agreement with Mike Richards to resolve the grievance filed in relation to the termination of his NHL Standard Players Contract. The terms are agreeable to all parties.”

The club said that it will not be commenting further “on the terms” of the settlement.

The NHLPA released a similar statement.

It was reported earlier in the week that a settlement was close to being reached; however, it wasn’t clear what salary-cap penalties the Kings would incur.

We’re starting to find out some details now:

How the final numbers differ from what the Kings would have incurred if they’d bought Richards out will be interesting to see. And if there are differences, how will they be justified?

Stay tuned.