Trevor Linden

Last lockout was “massive philosophical divide,” says former NHLPA president Linden


Depending who you ask, former player and NHLPA president Trevor Linden was either the hero that helped end the 2004-05 lockout, or a traitor.

Arguing for the former, here’s The Vancouver’s Sun Iain McIntyre:

He should have been honoured for saving the National Hockey League eight years ago, working through back channels to broker peace and build an exit lane from a destructive dispute that scuttled the 2004-05 season. Instead, Linden was vilified by some as the traitor who toppled NHL Players’ Association czar Bob Goodenow and “caved” to league owners, who got their salary cap.

Caved? Really? After a full season lost and no end in sight to the labour war? How many winters without the NHL needed to pass in Canada before it would have been honourable to devise a Plan B?

Not only did Linden, as the union president, get the NHL back on the ice, the NHLPA just about ran the table on contract items. The players’ “defeat” was so complete they collected $12 billion US in salaries over the life of a Collective Bargaining Agreement that enabled owners to generate record revenues and dramatically escalate the value of their franchises, as evidenced by Forbes’ current valuation of the Canucks at $342 million and the Toronto Maple Leafs at $1 billion.

And for the latter, The Vancouver Province’s Tony Gallagher:

The players are now feeling the consequences of the work of Trevor Linden and his henchmen, who stabbed their leadership in the back during the last tough lockout, taking the easy way out and letting Ted Saskin give the owners everything their hearts desired. Now the players have swallowed the salary cap, all the owners have to do now is get them to accept an increasingly lower percentage of the revenue every time a CBA expires.

Regardless of his legacy, Linden believes there’s a dramatic difference between the last lockout (the owners wanted a salary cap, the players didn’t) and the current one.

“It was a massive philosophical divide,” Linden said Thursday. “It was a huge philosophical divide on the economics of the game. … This isn’t.”

Linden’s role in the 2004-05 lockout is especially noteworthy today as the players consider the league’s offer to meet with owners without commissioner Gary Bettman and NHLPA leader Donald Fehr.

In January of 2005, Linden met with former Flames owner and NHL chairman of the board Harley Hotchkiss (without Bettman or then union executive director Bob Goodenow) in a last-ditch effort to save the season.

While the season was ultimately scrapped, the Linden-Hotchkiss relationship was considered a key factor in finally ending the dispute.

After lopsided loss, Julien says it’s ‘not about the young D’

Claude Julien

The Boston Bruins’ young, makeshift defense failed to come through Thursday night as the B’s were thumped, 6-2, on home ice by the Winnipeg Jets.

Without injured veterans Zdeno Chara and Dennis Seidenberg, the defensive pairings were as follows:

Torey KrugAdam McQuaid
Joe MorrowKevan Miller
Matt IrwinZach Trotman

And let’s just say, turnovers were a factor:

That was Irwin getting checked off the puck there.

“I had the puck behind the net, and I went to one side of the net, and then I just didn’t use the net to my advantage,” he explained afterwards, per CSN New England. “He got his stick in there, obviously stripped me of the puck, and we all know what happened after that. I take full blame for that one.”

But head coach Claude Julien wasn’t willing to blame inexperience for the poor outing.

“It’s not about youth. It’s not about the young D,” said Julien. “It’s about our game without the puck. I think we might have gotten a little excited here about our offense and forgot about the other part of our game.”

And to be fair, even Boston’s more accomplished d-men had their challenging moments.

Here’s Krug failing to get position on Nicolas Petan in front of the Bruins’ net:

All in all, it was a tough night.

“We’ll correct those [mistakes] tomorrow in practice,” said Irwin. “We’re a confident group in here. We liked our offense. We liked the chances we were getting. All those mistakes, D-zone, are something that we’re going to work on and get better every day.”

The Bruins host their rivals from Montreal on Saturday.

Greene named 11th captain in Devils history

Dion Phaneuf; Andy Greene
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Andy Greene has been named Bryce Salvador’s successor as New Jersey’s team captain.

Greene, an undrafted free agent that’s spent his entire nine-year career with the Devils organization, becomes the 11th captain in the franchise’s history and third American to wear the “C” (Zach Parise and Jamie Langenbrunner were the others).

A former standout at Miami of Ohio, Greene — who served as an alternate captain in each of the last two seasons — has developed into a steady, durable blueliner that hasn’t missed a game in three years. He’s also locked into the Devils long term, having signed a five-year, $25 million extension with the club last summer.

That deal kicks in this season, and runs through 2020.

As for the rest of the leadership group, four players will serve as alternate captains this season: Patrik Elias, Travis Zajac, Mike Cammalleri, and Adam Henrique.

Elias and Zajac both wore an “A” in New Jersey last year, while Cammalleri and Henrique are first-timers.