Phil Kessel and Dion Phaneuf

Maple Leafs worth $1 billion, says Forbes


They haven’t made the playoffs since before the last lockout, but the Toronto Maple Leafs are still worth a cool $1 billion, according to the newest Forbes valuations.

The Leafs’ valuation is by far the highest of all 30 NHL franchises, and it dwarfs the dollar figure assigned to the least valuable clubs.

After the Leafs, it’s the New York Rangers ($750 million), Montreal Canadiens ($575 million), Chicago Blackhawks ($350 million), and Boston Bruins ($348 million).

At the bottom end, the St. Louis Blues are the least valuable franchise at $130 million, slightly lower than the Phoenix Coyotes ($134 million) and Columbus Blue Jackets ($145 million).

It should be noted that in cases like the Blues, Forbes was able to use actual recent sale prices to determine value. For teams like the Bruins (Jeremy Jacobs has owned the B’s since 1975), valuations are estimates.

A few notes:

—- The Leafs are worth almost eight times more than the Blues. That’s a massive discrepancy compared to the NFL, where Forbes values the most valuable Dallas Cowboys ($2.1 billion) at just 2.7 times more than No. 32 Jacksonville ($770 million).*

—- Forbes estimates that 17 NHL teams are profitable, led by the Leafs with annual operating income of $81.9 million. League-wide earnings were pegged at $250 million, a number the league would likely dispute as too high.

—- The average franchise value is around $282 million. The average Canadian franchise value is around $400 million.

—- Winnipeg is the least valuable Canadian franchise at $200 million (No. 20).

—- Of the 10 least valuable franchises, six of them are in markets where it very rarely snows. (And we’re not talking about Vancouver.)

—- The brand value Forbes assigns to the Coyotes is $13 million. For the Leafs, it’s $154 million.

* The great equalizer in the NFL is national TV money, which is in the neighborhood of $3 billion per year and divided evenly among all franchises. The NHL is far more dependent on ticket sales and local broadcasting revenue. Thus, the NHLPA’s push for more revenue-sharing between franchises.

Habs claim Byron off waivers from Flames

Paul Byron
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Montreal added some forward depth on Tuesday, acquiring diminutive forward Paul Byron off waivers from Calgary.

Byron, 26, is a veteran of nearly 150 career NHL games, most coming with the Flames. Despite fairly solid production over the last two years — 40 points in 104 games — he was exposed to waivers on Monday, along with fellow forward Mason Raymond.

(Calgary does have a logjam of players at forward, hence parting ways with Byron and Raymond.)

Byron can play both wing and center but, at 5-foot-7, 153 pounds, is one of the most undersized skaters in the league. Thankfully for him, Montreal has an affinity for undersized forwards, with the likes of Brendan Gallagher (5-foot-9, 184 pounds) and David Desharnais (5-foot-7, 174 pounds) already on the active roster.

Byron could also fill Zack Kassian‘s roster spot. Kassian is currently suspended without pay while undergoing Stage 2 of the NHL’s Substance Abuse program.

Isles claim goalie Berube off waivers

Evgeny Kuznetsov, Jaroslav Halak
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The New York Islanders have claimed goalie Jean-Francois Berube off waivers from the Los Angeles Kings, the club announced today.

Berube won the Calder Cup last season with AHL Manchester, but the 24-year-old has yet to appear in an NHL game.

That the Isles claimed Berube could be evidence that Jaroslav Halak will not be ready to start the season after all.

If that’s the case, Berube would back up Thomas Greiss, with Stephon Williams expected to go to the AHL.

The Isles open their regular season Friday at home versus the Blackhawks, then play the next day in Chicago.