Joe Sakic

19 impressive facts about Joe Sakic


In anticipation of Monday’s Hockey Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, PHT is taking an in-depth look at each of the four main entrants.

Joe Sakic might not have provided explosive quotes, but his staggering numbers and all-time-great wrist shot were memorable enough. Here are 19 facts/milestones from his incredible career:

1. Sakic scored a point (an assist) in his first career game in 1988-89 and found the net for the first time in his second – against Sean Burke.

2. Even better, he began his career on a 12-game point streak, according to Hockey Reference.

3. Sakic made his first of 12 All-Star appearances in 1990, collecting two assists in Pittsburgh.

4. He scored 100 points for the first time in his second campaign.

5. Later on, he’d become the second-oldest player to hit the 100-point plateau. Sakic did at 37, behind only Gordie Howe.

6. He won the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1995-96, scoring 18 goals and 34 points in 22 postseason games.

7. Not surprisingly, that’s when he won the first of two Stanley Cups.

8. Sakic’s eight playoff overtime goals is an NHL record.

9. His 1,641 career points places him ninth all-time.

10. He collected his 1,000th career point on Dec. 27, 1999:

11. Sakic became the 11th player to collect 1,000 assists on  March 22, 2008.

12. His 625 goals ranks 15th all-time. Here’s No. 600:

13. Sakic is a member of the “Triple Gold Club,” having won a Stanley Cup, World Hockey Championship and Olympic gold medal.

14. Speaking of that Olympic gold medal, Sakic took home the MVP award of that 2002 tournament.

15. Sakic was drafted 15th overall in 1987, going behind some greats (Brendan Shanahan, Curtis Joseph) and some not-so-greats (Bryan Fogarty, Keith Osborne).

16. He basically owns the Colorado Avalanche/Quebec Nordiques record books, claiming the all-time lead in: goals, assists, points, power-play goals, short-handed goals and game-winning goals. (That also goes for many of the team’s playoff records.)

17. He was the second-longest serving captain in NHL history, according to the Avs.

18. The 2000-01 season was special for Joe. He won his second Cup and took home the Hart Trophy, Lady Byng and Ted Lindsay awards.

19. For all his accolades – these are just the highlights of his astounding career – many will remember what No. 19 did for No. 77 more than anything else:

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One
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Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.