Joey Hishon #18 and Jesse Blacker #12 of the Owen Sound Attack watch for a loose puck along with Matt Fraser #11 of the Kootenay Ice during the 2011 CHL Mastercard Memorial Cup game on May 21, 2011 at the Hershey Centre in Mississauga, Canada. The Attack defeated the Ice 5-0.
(May 20, 2011 - Source: Claus Andersen/Getty Images North America)

CHLPA threatens to sue OHL over “blatant disregard” for working standards

1 Comment

The Canadian Hockey League Players’ Association is threatening to sue Ontario Hockey League over what it believes is a “blatant disregard for the bare minimum working standards that have been set for employees,” according to the Globe and Mail.

The CHLPA is a fledgling union with the goal of representing players under the umbrella of the Ontario Hockey League, Western Hockey League, and Quebec Major Junior Hockey League.

Major junior players — which range from the age of 15 to 20 — are typically paid about $35-$50 per week. The leagues prepare them for playing hockey professionally and many of the NHL’s best players have spent some time in the OHL, QMJHL or WHL along the way.

Additionally, education packages are made available, though there are limitations such as an 18-month expiration date.

The CHLPA claims the OHL is in violation of the Ontario’s Employment Standards Act for not paying its players minimum wage or providing them with vacation and overtime pay.

CHLPA spokesman Derek Clarke characterized legal action as a last resort and said the CHLPA hopes to engage in negotiations. At the same time, Clarke has a harsh opinion of the current state of the CHL.

“They don’t want to pay [more] in education, they want to restrict it, but then they don’t want to pay salaries either,” Clarke explained. “Basically they’re sweatshops. I just don’t get it why this has gone on for so long.”

NHL player agent Todd Christie previously filed a lawsuit against the OHL in 2005 when one of his clients didn’t get his education package on time. However, Christie gave credit to the CHL for enhancing their education system since that time.

“The minimum-wage issue is certainly a live one,” Christie said. “But the majority of complaints that I would have had [with the education system] before 2006 or so have been addressed and resolved.”

He still thinks the union probably has a strong case if it sues.


Should junior hockey players get paid more?

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.