The Montreal Canadiens are introduced before playing against the Philadelphia Flyers in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference Finals during the 2010 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Bell Centre on May 20, 2010 in Montreal, Canada. (Photo by Michael Heiman/Getty Images))
(May 19, 2010 - Source: Michael Heiman/Getty Images North America)

NHL memorabilia shop manager “suffering” because of lockout


Even in a city as passionate about hockey as Montreal, the lockout causing the locals to pass on Canadiens memorabilia, and that hurts shop managers like Santana Enrique.

Enrique has spent 16 years working at Sports Crescent and since the lockout started, he’s been “suffering,” based on what he said in an Ottawa Sun report.

Enrique pays about $12,000 a month in rent for his store recently sold all of $146 worth of goods over the span of five hours.

“It’s worthless without the Canadiens and no hockey,” Enrique said.

“People have stopped buying NHL (gear). They’ve turned to the NFL and to baseball. Hockey, there is nothing. Our store is 70% of hockey (sales) and then other sports. I’m completely depressed. It’s awful.

“This morning, I was quiet. I can’t talk to the customers. I have no energy to talk. No power to beg them to buy. I put the stuff at 50%, they can buy it or leave it. I’m not going to make money at 50% off.”

The longer the lockout goes on, the longer local businesses that have come to rely on hockey will have to be forced to endure until the owners and players agree on a way to divide the reported $3.3 billion in hockey-related revenues.

The two sides are expected to meet on Tuesday, but we’re going to have to wait to see what those talks will even focus on.

The union and owners have largely avoided the key economic issues in their recent discussions, despite NHLPA’s Steve Fehr suggesting that a deal could be done in “six hours” if the two sides were able to come to an understanding on the “major issues.”

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.