Malcolm Subban

Get to know a draft pick — Malcolm Subban


All week leading up to the 2012 NHL Entry Draft in Pittsburgh, we’ll be profiling top prospects who may hear their names called Friday in the first round. Nothing too in-depth. Just enough so you know who they are and what they’re about.

Malcolm Subban (G)

Height: 6’1 Weight: 188 Catches: Left

Team: Belleville Bulls (OHL)

Country: Canada

NHL Central Scouting ranking: No. 1 among North American goalies

What kind of player is he?

One of three hockey-playing brothers — older brother P.K. is with the Montreal Canadiens, younger brother Jordan just finished his rookie year in Belleville — Subban has strong hockey bloodlines and comes from an athletic family. His dad and older sister were Canadian university basketball stars; his mom ran track in high school.

That said, Subban doesn’t rely solely on athleticism. Scouts like his poise, positioning and competitive fire, but do acknowledge he’s got terrific lateral ability, which makes his butterfly style all the more effective.

Subban’s biggest asset, though, is a word beloved by draft gurus: Upside.

He only started tending goal at age 12 and is still learning the position. That’s tantalizing for his long term projection because, during his time in Belleville, Subban has gotten better with each passing year. He went from being a low pick at the OHL Priority Draft to representing Canada at the World U-18s to becoming one of the best goalies in the league last season.

Because of his size and playing style, Subban has drawn comparisons to Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist.


“It’s in his blood. He’s a natural goaltender. He’s big but he doesn’t just stand and get hit by the puck. He’s so athletic, he uses a lot of his reflexes.” — Sebastien Farrese, Belleville goalie coach

More draft profiles:

Nail Yakupov

Filip Forsberg

Report: Kings, Richards nearing settlement

Mike Richards
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The Los Angeles Kings and Mike Richards may be nearing a settlement in their dispute over Richards’ terminated contract, TSN’s Bob McKenzie is reporting.

You can read the report for all the details, but we’re sure curious about this part:

If a settlement is reached, there’s no word yet on what salary cap penalties the Kings would still face. There’s bound to be something, but not likely as onerous as the full value of Richards’ contract, which carries with it a cap hit of $5.75 million. If there’s a settlement, Richards would undoubtedly become a free agent though there’s no telling at this point what monies he would be entitled to from the Kings in a settlement.

The issue here is precedent, and what this case could set. The NHL and NHLPA can’t allow teams to escape onerous contracts through a back door, and many are adamant that that’s what the Kings were attempting to do in Richards’ case.

Bettman to players: Don’t screw up ‘once-in-a-lifetime opportunity’ with drugs

Gary Bettman
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The NHL wants to take an educational approach — not a punitive one — to deter its players from using illicit drugs like cocaine.

“My interest is not to go around punishing people,” Bettman told Sportsnet today.

“My interest is getting players to understand the consequences of doing something that could jeopardize this great, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that they’ve been given, to play in the NHL.”

While some players have expressed surprise at hearing that cocaine use is growing, the anecdotal evidence of substance abuse has been very much in the news, from Jarret Stoll‘s arrest to Mike Richards’ arrest to, more recently, Zack Kassian‘s placement in the NHL/NHLPA’s treatment program.

“We don’t have the unilateral right to do things here. We need the consent of the Players’ Association,” Bettman said. “It’s not about punishment. It’s about making sure we get it to stop.”

Related: Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?