What they’re saying about Game 5 of 2012 Stanley Cup finals

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The Los Angeles Kings carried chunks of the play in Game 5, but the New Jersey Devils – and particularly Martin Brodeur – were up to the task. They extended the 2012 Stanley Cup finals to a sixth game with a 2-1 win tonight, inspiring waves of interesting commentary in perhaps the most entertaining contest of the series. Let’s take a look at what was said about the Devils’ big win on Twitter tonight.

Why the Devils won/Kings lost

For many, the story was as much about the Kings’ best players not coming through as it was about Brodeur’s brilliance. That’s the argument Joe Pelletier made and Joe Haggerty goes a step further by singling out Anze Kopitar.

“Anybody seen Anze Kopitar tonight? Yeah, me neither.”

Pretty hard not to pick on the Kings’ biggest star, even if he’s been outstanding for most of the postseason. Frozen Royalty offered an explanation that’s probably even more unsettling for Los Angeles, though.

“Devils have neutralized the Kings’ forecheck and won the vast majority of loose puck battles. That’s why they’re winning.”

Uh oh. Ivan Makarov sees a resemblance to the first 60 games of the Kings’ season, which isn’t going to make any Kings fans happy.


Ultimately, Brodeur’s age-defiant work has been the biggest story of the series and was the headline-grabber in Game 5 to boot. Cam Charron’s one-liner captured Brodeur’s great work in the most amusing way.

“Martin Brodeur could save the publishing industry the way he’s playing.”

Nice. There was also an amusing moment when Brodeur had his jersey pulled over his head. Greg Wyshynski’s quip probably takes the cake there.

Assorted bits

People provided rave reviews for the play in Game 5. Scott Burnside loved it; so did Nick Cotsonika. George Malik’s phrasing was likely the most entertaining, however.

“This. Pace. Is. Nuts. Ups, downs, momentum bouncing around like the puck, just fantastic stuff.”

If all the other developments didn’t upset the stomachs of Kings fans enough, Scotty Wazz’s comparison after a Jonathan Quick puckhandling flub should just about do it.

“Also, looked like Quick was channeling Roman Cechmanek on that one.”



Anyway, that’s a quick collection of some of the best quips and observations from Game 5. We’ll provide another gallery of good gags on Monday … and perhaps Wednesday as well?

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.