Rangers Devils Forwards

Rangers-Devils Eastern Conference finals matchup: Forwards

With the Devils and Rangers set to begin the 2012 Eastern Conference finals tonight at Madison Square Garden, PHT will be spending most of today breaking down the positional matchups.


New York Rangers (lines)

Carl Hagelin — Brad Richards — Marian Gaborik

Chris Kreider — Derek Stepan — Ryan Callahan

Ruslan Fedotenko — Brian Boyle — Artem Anisimov

Mike Rupp — John Mitchell — Brandon Prust

Overview: Richards and Gaborik lead the charge with 11 and 10 points respectively, and both have provided timely scoring (Richards especially).

After going scoreless in his first five games, Stepan has eight points in his last nine.

Outside of some occasional production from Anisimov and Boyle’s early heroics against Ottawa, the bottom six hasn’t provided much offense at all.

Strengths: The Rangers are versatile up front. Richards and Gaborik bring the skill, Hagelin and Kreider possess a speed game, Boyle and Callahan are physical presences while fourth-liners Prust and Rupp provide requisite toughness.

Weaknesses: Due in part to their workmanlike approach (and no bonafide No. 2 goalscorer after Gaborik), the Rangers are prone to long dry spells — specially at 5-on-5 (1.36 per game). There was a stretch during the Washington series where NY only scored one “pure” 5-on-5 goal in over 144 minutes of action, not counting Gaborik’s bank shot off Matt Hendricks in Game 6.

New Jersey Devils (lines)

Zach Parise — Patrik Elias — David Clarkson

Alexei Ponikarovsky — Travis Zajac — Ilya Kovalchuk

Petr Sykora — Adam Henrique — Dainius Zubrus

Ryan Carter — Stephen Gionta — Steve Bernier

Overview: Much like their defense, the Devils utilize a balanced attack. Twelve different forwards have at least three points (compared to eight Rangers forwards) with the highly-underrated Sykora-Henrique-Zubrus line combining for 18. That said, New Jersey’s high-end talent has carried the team at times. Most notable was Kovalchuk’s Game 3 performance against Philly which drew “world class” reviews.

Strengths: The forecheck. New Jersey runs an aggressive two-man system that absolutely throttled the Flyers (the Devils outscored them 14-8 even strength.) Here’s what MSG analyst Ken Daneyko told New York Magazine about New Jersey establishing the forecheck against Philly:

I thought the Devils felt they could exploit their defense, and that’s exactly what they did, by getting pucks in the corner — the Devils are one of the better cycling teams in the league — and they use their big bodies protecting it and spending a lot of time in the Flyers’ end.

Even if they didn’t score on a particular shift, if you’re in there 30 or 40 seconds, that can really wear a team down, physically as well as mentally, and I think that’s what they were able to accomplish against the Flyers.

Weaknesses: It’s not the toughest, meanest or most physical group. Peter DeBoer has parked two of the more noteworthy pugilists from the regular season brouhahas (Eric Boulton, Cam Janssen) in favor of more versatile players — like the 5-foot-7, 185-pound Gionta.

Struggling Sabre Tyler Ennis out with upper-body injury

Tyler Ennis, James Wisniewski
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Tyler Ennis can probably relate with the Buffalo Sabres’ opponent on Wednesday, as he’s struggling almost as much as the Nashville Predators.

Perhaps some of that has to do with health?

Whether that’s the case or not, Ennis is out for the Sabres tonight, as the team announced that he’s dealing with an upper-body injury.

The Buffalo News discussed Ennis’ struggles in this article.

“I’d say he’s pressing too much. You can’t make those plays in every situation and in every point you touch the puck,” Dan Bylsma said to the Buffalo News. “ … He’s just got to simplify his game. He is a special player who can make those plays, but he can’t be trying to do it every time he touches the puck.”

He’ll need to wait a while to start getting things together, anyway.

WATCH LIVE: Wednesday Night Rivalry (Flyers-Islanders; Blackhawks-Sharks)

Ryan White, Matt Martin
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You can check out tonight’s Wednesday Night Rivalry doubleheader on NBCSN, and you can also stream them online.

Here are the handy links for the two contests.

First, the New York Islanders host the Philadelphia Flyers.


After that, the Chicago Blackhawks visit the San Jose Sharks.


Braun out with upper-body injury; Zubrus to make Sharks debut

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The San Jose Sharks will be missing a top-4 defenseman tonight when they host the defending champs from Chicago.

Justin Braun has an upper-body injury. His status is considered day-to-day.

“Brauny has been one of our unsung heroes here through the first quarter of the season,” coach Peter DeBoer told CSN Bay Area. “He’s played some outstanding hockey. So, we’re going to miss him, but it’s a great opportunity for Mueller and Tennyson and one of these guys to establish themselves. It’s a great opportunity for us to reward Dillon for how well he’s played.”

Against the Blackhawks, Brenden Dillon will take Braun’s spot on the top pairing alongside Marc-Edouard Vlasic; Paul Martin and Brent Burns will stay together on the second pairing; and 20-year-old Mirco Mueller will skate with Matt Tennyson.

Mueller has played just four games for the Sharks this season. In his last game, Thursday in Philadelphia, he received only 9:13 of ice time.

Also tonight, new Shark forward Dainius Zubrus is expected to debut on the fourth line.

Related: Sharks sign Zubrus, because DeBoer

Johansen calls trade rumblings ‘weird,’ says relationship with Torts is ‘great’

Ryan Johansen
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One day after reports surfaced of Ryan Johansen being at the center of trade talks, all parties involved from Columbus did what they’re supposed to do — downplay the situation.

You can read the denials in full over at the Dispatch, but here’s the gist:

— Johansen said the rumors were “weird” and that he’s “never seen it before.” He also said there were no issues between him and head coach John Tortorella, calling the relationship “great.”

— GM Jarmo Kekalainen wouldn’t address the report, nor would Johansen’s agent, Kurt Overhardt.

— Johansen added he hasn’t spoken to any of Columbus’ management about the trade rumblings.

So there’s that. What’s next?

At this stage of the game, it’s hard not to think about another Overhardt client, Kyle Turris.

Turris, you’ll recall, spent four (mostly) stormy years with the Coyotes before his trade out to Ottawa was orchestrated. Turris eventually told GM Don Maloney “this is not going to work out” with the club, and he was gone.

So, consider the similarities now:

— Turris was 22 at the time of the trade, with four years and 137 games under his belt.

— Johansen is 23, with five years and 291 games.

— Both had contentious contract holdouts with their respective clubs.

— Both are Overhardt guys.

— The Turris trade happened after the Coyotes went from Wayne Gretzky to Dave Tippett as head coach.

— Johansen is already on his third head coach (Scott Arniel, Todd Richards, Tortorella).

For now, these are all coincidences (or a forced narrative, depending what you think of the author).

And, of course, the one big — big — difference between the two is that, at the time of his trade, Turris wasn’t as good or established a player as Johansen currently is. Therefore, logic suggests any Johansen trade would be a lot more blockbuster-y and, therefore, probably more complex.

And as we know, complex deals aren’t easy to pull off.