shot block coyotes

Tippett on shot blocking: “I don’t know if it’s good for the game. It’s good for winning”


Dave Feschuk of the Toronto Star takes an in-depth look at the postseason of blocked shots:

Perhaps it’s not a complete coincidence that the teams that currently lead the playoffs in shot blocks, the New York Rangers and Washington Capitals, are engaged in a series in which neither has scored more than three goals in a game. The Rangers, in fact, have played in a record 12 straight post-season games in which neither participant has hit four on the scoreboard.

The crowds of defenders clogging shooting lanes have become impossible enough to navigate that, if you’re an offensive player with the puck at the point, one of the lone wise options is to shoot 10 feet wide and hope for a fortuitous bounce off the back boards.

How to remove the net-front glut? Hall of famer Bob Gainey once bandied about a rule that outlawed the defensive player leaving his feet to block a shot. Pierre Page, the former NHL coach and GM, has suggested a variation of basketball’s three-in-the-key violation. Widening rinks might change some angles for the better.

Just as there are no easy answers, those with close ties to current results aren’t pushing for change.

Those with close ties to current results include Washington head coach Dale Hunter, New York head coach John Tortorella and Phoenix head coach Dave Tippett, whose Coyotes average 17 blocks per game.

“Basically, at this time of year you do whatever it takes to win,” Tippett told The Star. “And if that’s laying down in front of a shot and getting in a shot lane to deter a shot at the net, ultimately players feel like that gives you a better chance to win.”

At this time, I’d like to point out there’s as much shot blocking now as there was during those early, halcyon days immediately following the lockout. You know, when offense ruled and every game ended 8-7.

Consider this reverse chronological chart:

— Two years ago, Montreal blocked an amazing 408 in 19 games (21 per contest) en route to a surprising Eastern Conference finals appearance.

— In 2009, Pittsburgh blocked 406 on its way to the Stanley Cup. Of note, that was 174 blocks more than the No. 2 team, Detroit (232).

— In 2008, Philadelphia only played 17 games en route to the Eastern Conference final, but finished second in the league with 323 shot blocks.

— In 2007, Buffalo only played 16 games en route to the Eastern Conference final, but finished second in the league with 290 shot blocks. (Of note, that Sabres team also finished first in the NHL in offense.)

— In 2006, Carolina blocked 420 in 25 games (17 per) and won the Stanley Cup.

The reality is that, regardless of the style of play, blocking shots is a big part of postseason success.

Just ask Tip.

“I don’t know if it’s good for the game,” Tippett said. “It’s good for winning.”

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One
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Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.