And then there were 10: Bruins run out of Game 7 magic

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Three of the Boston Bruins’ four series required a Game 7 victory last year, so experience was on their side. If anyone’s shown how much experience can matter – that is to say, little sometimes – it’s playoff rookie/Washington Capitals hero Braden Holtby. He was up to the task in a razor-thin showdown that ultimately ended with a 2-1 Game 7 win in overtime, sending the Bruins to the golf course after a tight 4-3 series.

What happened?

Tim Thomas wasn’t awful by any means, but it’s tough to argue that Braden Holtby didn’t at least equal his output. Even Holtby’s loudest supporters probably didn’t expect him to play as well as the reigning Vezina Trophy winner. Ultimately, Dale Hunter morphed the Capitals into a defense first second and last team and it worked well enough to beat the defending champions.

Who takes the blame?

The Bruins won the 2011 Stanley Cup with an awful power play, but they might look back at it with serious regret after this series. They only went 2-for-21 in this series and did next to nothing on a questionable man advantage late in the third period on Wednesday. Beyond the power play, the Bruins’ best line from last year didn’t do well with Nathan Horton on the sidelines full-time. Milan Lucic and David Krejci only managed three points apiece in seven games, which just wasn’t enough in a low-scoring series.

What will they do about it?

The Bruins’ core is more or less in place, but the biggest area of interesting potential change might be in net. Tuukka Rask needs a new contract while Tim Thomas will enter the final year of his deal in 2012-13. If Rask cannot fit under the cap, GM Peter Chiarelli might have a decision to make.

The bright side of that is if he opts to trade either player, he can add some offensive burst or give Zdeno Chara and Dennis Seidenberg a little help on the blueline.

Either way, the Bruins will finish this season with regret, yet they probably won’t feel much pressure to make big changes.

More

And then there were 15: Is Detroit’s dynasty on its last legs?

And then there were 14: Sharks come out flat in playoffs

And then there were 13: Powerhouse Pens fall flat

And then there were 12: Presidents’ Trophy-winning Canucks bounced in Round 1

And then there were 11: Another first-round exit for Blackhawks

2017 Stanley Cup Playoffs schedule for Monday, May 29

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After going three full days without any NHL hockey, we’ll finally get to see some action, as Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final goes tonight in Pittsburgh.

The Penguins will look to become the first team in the salary cap era to win back-to-back Stanley Cups, while the Predators will try to land the first championship in team history.

Here’s what you need to know:

Nashville Predators vs. Pittsburgh Penguins 

Time: 8:00 p.m. ET

Network NBCSN (Stream online here)

Related:

For Pittsburgh’s defense, it’s been a group effort to replace Letang

Pens can become first repeat in salary cap era

Minus Johansen, Preds have “some big shoes to fill”

On the big stage, Subban can’t espace “The Trade”

PHT Morning Skate: Goalie throws stick at cameraman after losing Memorial Cup

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–Heading into Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final, Pekka Rinne has the best odds of winning the Conn Smythe trophy at 3.75-1. Evgeni Malkin, Sidney Crosby and Matt Murray round out the top four. (The Score)

–The Ottawa Senators made a run to the Eastern Conference Final this spring, but that doesn’t mean they won’t face challenges this off-season. Sportsnet looks at six issues they’ll have to deal with over the summer. It starts with re-signing key players like Jean-Gabriel Pageau. (Sportsnet)

–Everyone knows that the Penguins have a huge advantage over the Predators at the center position, especially with the injury to Ryan Johansen. The Hockey News evaluates whether or not Nashville can overcome such a disadvantage. (The Hockey News)

–NHL legends Wayne Gretzky, Nicklas Lidstrom and others explain why the Stanley Cup is “The People’s Cup”. From adult clubs, to Russia, Hollywood, the cup has seen it all. (Top)

–After losing the memorial cup to the Windsor Spitfires on Sunday night, Erie Otters goalie Troy Timpano threw his stick at a cameraman that was filming the Otters bench, while the Spitfires were celebrating. (BarDown)

Timpano later apologized for his actions.

P.K. Subban played the role of reporter during media day at the Stanley Cup Final. The Preds defenseman asked his teammates some pretty interesting questions to say the least. (Sportsnet)

 

Stanley Cup experience ‘doesn’t guarantee anything’ for Penguins

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PITTSBURGH (AP) The dynasty that once appeared so certain is again in the offing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Four victories against the Nashville Predators in the Stanley Cup Final would make Pittsburgh the first franchise to win back-to-back championships in nearly 20 years and the first in the parity-driven salary cap era. It would give stars Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin their third Cup, one more than their boss – owner Mario Lemieux – earned during his Hall of Fame career and check off whatever boxes remain unchecked for a duo that is becoming one of the most accomplished in NHL history.

Yet for all the resiliency the Penguins have shown during their injury-marred title defense, they are taking nothing for granted heading into Game 1 on Monday night.

Not their home-ice advantage. Not their massive edge in Stanley Cup Final experience (156 games vs. just five for the Predators, all by captain Mike Fisher while playing for Ottawa a decade ago). Not their ability under coach Mike Sullivan to thrive under the pressure that once seemed to crush them.

“I think the fact that a lot of guys went through it last year and they can draw from that experience is good,” Crosby said. “But it doesn’t guarantee anything.”

Certainly not against the swaggering and well-rested Predators.

One of the last teams to qualify for the playoffs is now the last one standing between the Penguins and another parade in downtown Pittsburgh. Just don’t call Nashville the underdog. The Predators have hardly played like one while beating Chicago in a lopsided four-game sweep then outrunning St. Louis and outlasting Anaheim to reach the Cup final for the first time.

“I know we were the eighth seed but we didn’t feel like a group that we were,” Fisher said.

Now the guys from the place that calls itself “Smashville” have a chance to become the first franchise to win the Cup in its first try since Carolina did 11 years ago. That team, like this one, is based in a place hardly considered hockey hotbed a generation ago. This team, like that one, was led by coach Peter Laviolette. This team, like that one, has nothing to lose.

“This year we were kind of mediocre in the standings and maybe that’s what we needed just to come into the playoffs not really caring about home ice or who we were playing but just knowing comfortably and confidently as a team we could be in this position,” said Predators defenseman P.K. Subban.

Read more: Early struggles, injuries made Predators ‘stronger as a team’

A position the Penguins have become increasingly comfortable in under Sullivan.

The core that Crosby and Malkin led to the Cup in 2009 went through seven frustrating and fruitless springs before returning to the top in 2016. Now they’re here again, aware of the stakes but hardly caught up in the hype.

“I think that it’s a tough road no matter how you get here,” Crosby said.

“We found ways all season long and in the playoffs we’ve found ways. We’ve had that same mentality and that’s helped us. I think that’s kind of been our biggest strength.”

Maple Leafs prospect Jeremy Bracco leads Windsor Spitfires to Memorial Cup title

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Just over two months after signing his entry level deal with the Toronto Maple Leafs, 20-year-old forward Jeremy Bracco left his mark on the Memorial Cup championship game.

Selected by the Maple Leafs in the second round of the 2015 NHL Draft, Bracco had a dominant finale on Sunday, with a goal and two assists as the Windsor Spitfires defeated the Erie Otters by a final score of 4-3.

To cap it off, Bracco assisted on the winning goal from Aaron Luchuk early in the third period.

That ends a great season for Bracco, who is listed at five-foot-nine-inches tall, but has produced impressive offensive numbers since coming to the Ontario Hockey League. He had 83 points in 57 games split between the Spitfires and Kitchener Rangers, the team he began this season with.

The Memorial Cup is always a great showcase for NHL prospects. Logan Brown, the towering center and 2016 first-round pick of the Ottawa Senators, also had a pair of assists.

A pair of draft eligible players also had a big day for Windsor.

Gabriel Vilardi, the No. 4-ranked North American skater heading into next month’s draft and a potential top-five pick, had a pair of assists. Michael DiPietro, the No. 4-ranked North American goalie in Central Scouting’s final rankings, made 32 saves. He also had some luck, courtesy his goal posts, which denied Blackhawks high-scoring prospect Alex DeBrincat, among others from Erie’s talented team.

The Spitfires were defeated in the opening round of the OHL playoffs, but made it to the Memorial Cup tournament as the host team.