Talking about concussions — a collection of quotes

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This post is part of a series looking at the issue and impact of concussions in the NHL. ProHockeyTalk and Comcast SportsNet are featuring pieces today as a lead-in to tonight’s special edition of NHL Live on Versus (6:30 p.m. EST.)

Concussions are hardly a new phenomenon in the NHL. As such, we decided to look back at what’s been said and written on the topic of head injuries throughout the years.

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(NHL.com)

“My first season Butch Bouchard accidentally sent me to the hospital for three days with a concussion, but I never backed away from Butch or anyone else after I came back.” – former Red Wings player Ted Lindsay (Sports Illustrated, March 18, 1957)

“As a result of [a] concussion, I now wear a protector on the back of my head, too.” – former NHL goalie and current Carolina GM Jim Rutherford (Sports Illustrated, Feb 12, 1973.)

“Three times it happened and I was never asked any questions. The question was ‘are you OK?’ Yeah, I’m OK. Well, get back out there.’ That was the way it was handled back then.” — former NHL player Mike Bossy on how concussions were treated in the 1970s and 1980s (Brockville Recorder and Times, Sep 28, 2011)

source: Getty Images

(Getty)

“I would walk into a room, and he would be crying. He cried a lot. Or he would be holding his head from the migraine headaches. They were terrible. He wouldn’t leave the house for a week. He wouldn’t change his clothes, wouldn’t shower. It was all the classic signs of depression. I thought he was having a nervous breakdown.” — former NHL player Pat LaFontaine’s wife, Marybeth (Sports Illustrated, Dec 1, 1997)

“Every time you sustain a head injury, the risk gets higher and higher. I always said that if there ever was a point where the risk was more than minimal, I would stop playing.” — LaFontaine upon his retirement (Chicago Tribune, Aug 12, 1998)

“I’ve been fortunate. I’ve had no residual effects whatsoever. I got out just in time.” – LaFontaine (Sports Illustrated, Nov 29, 2004)

”Force equals mass times acceleration. The larger the mass, the faster the acceleration, the greater the force. The greater the force, the greater the potential for injury. If the forces are going up, common sense would tell you that the potential for injury is increasing unless you decrease the risk for whatever reason. Unless you can decrease the force or absorb the force, chances are your injury rates are going to go up.” – Penguins physician Dr. Gordon Burke (New York Times, March 22, 1998)

“I was well-rounded, I’d been to college. It wasn’t that I couldn’t do anything else. I wanted to stay in sports, but if I couldn’t think, how was I going to play?” – Paul Kariya on worrying about how his brain was functioning while experiencing post-concussion syndrome (Sports Illustrated, Oct 19, 1998)

“At our scouting meetings, when we finalize the list [of potential draftees], I specifically ask our scouts, ‘Anybody on the list with a history of concussions?’” – Pierre Gauthier, then Anaheim’s GM (Sports Illustrated, May 17, 1999)

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“Having these concussions hanging over him has to be scary for Eric.” – former Flyers coach Roger Neilson on Eric Lindros (Sports Illustrated, Jan 31, 2000)

“What scares me is how easily it happened,” former Flyers forward Mark Recchi on yet another Lindros concussion (Sports Illustrated, Jan 31, 2000)

“I might have practiced stick-handling with my head up a bit more.” – Lindros, upon retirement, joking about what he’d do differently if he could start his career over (Toronto Star, Nov 9, 2007)

“Once the game is gone it doesn’t mean that your concussion symptoms are gone. You still have a long life you need to live, and I’m living proof of that.” – former NHL player Keith Primeau (Yahoo! Sports, Dec. 16, 2011)

“We can no longer ignore the stupidity of the hits that are still happening today despite the fact that the players know the concussion aspect is such a big part of the game and sports in general.” – former NHL player Jeremy Roenick (NHL.com, Dec 14, 2011)

source: AP

(AP)|

“It was the kind of light blow that is exchanged without notice or consequence hundreds of times in a game.” – former NHL goalie Ken Dryden on David Krejci’s hit that likely led to Sidney Crosby’s latest setback (Grantland, Dec 14, 2011)

“It didn’t feel like it was anything too major, but if you had to look at one hit that would be it.” – Crosby on the Krejci hit (CSNNE.com, Dec 14, 2011)

“I think you always have them in the back of your head. You always have it sitting there. You never know going into a hit or anything, you could have another concussion. It does get scary.” – Chicago forward Dave Bolland (CSNChicago.com, Dec 16, 2011)

“Any time you see somebody have to deal with a career-threatening thing, it really does concern you. You think about his family and what it’s like for them, what they’re going through.” – Penguins forward Chris Kunitz on news that Flyers defenseman Chris Pronger would miss the rest of the season with a concussion (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Dec. 16, 2011)

“He didn’t tell the trainer he had his bell rung. He kept it from us. Now he’ll be out for however long it takes.” – Leafs coach Ron Wilson on Colby Armstrong hiding his concussion from the team (Globe and Mail, Dec. 19, 2011)

Lightning storm back against Blackhawks, finish one point out of playoffs

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Who would have thought that the Tampa Bay Lightning would rally back from a 4-1 deficit tonight? Then again, who expected them to be so close to a playoff spot mere weeks ago, when they were sellers at the trade deadline?

The Lightning continue to show that they won’t just roll over and die, scoring four unanswered goals to beat the Chicago Blackhawks 5-4 in overtime on Monday.

While Jonathan Drouin was a catalyst for the second-period rally, it was an unlikely scorer who clinched the victory, as Yanni Gourde ended a thrilling run of 3-on-3 chances with the overtime-winner.

Really, it might have been fitting. Things looked glum when Tomas Jurco scored his first goal of the season against the Lightning, then the mood was totally flipped when Gourde’s second tally of 2016-17 grabbed a huge win.

With the Islanders losing to the Predators, the Hurricanes only managing a “loser point” against the Red Wings and the Bruins idle, Tampa Bay is a breath away from a playoff berth:

Final wild card: Bruins – 84 points in 75 games played

Lightning – 83 points in 75 GP
Islanders – 82 points in 75 GP
Hurricanes – 80 points in 74 GP

Yes, all of a sudden, a long-shot postseason run seems quite attainable.

Maybe the Lightning would prefer it if we kept counting them out, though?

Hurricanes’ Lack taken off on stretcher after collision on Red Wings’ OT goal

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The Carolina Hurricanes fell short of a win on Monday, but their thoughts likely revolve around the health of goalie Eddie Lack instead.

Lack was taken off the ice on a stretcher after a collision during Andreas Athanasiou‘s game-winning goal in overtime. Officials reviewed that the goal counted, giving the Red Wings a 4-3 overtime victory against Carolina.

While it’s been a tough overall season for Hurricanes goalie, Lack has been an integral part of Carolina’s push for a postseason spot. PHT will keep an eye out for updates regarding his condition after this scary collision.

The Red Wings stayed on the ice as Lack was taken off, a nice gesture after an unfortunate accident.

Drouin triggers second-period rally for Lightning vs. Blackhawks

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Just when you think it’s time to count the Tampa Bay Lightning out, they rally back.

It’s been happening overall in 2016-17, and that pattern carried over into Monday’s game against the Chicago Blackhawks.

The Lightning decided to put Andrei Vasilevskiy back in the net in the second period after he gave up three goals on eight shots in the opening frame … and at first, that looked like a mistake that would do them in. Chicago went up 4-1 and things looked dire.

But, again, the Bolts followed the script when it comes to flipping the script, with Jonathan Drouin triggering a resounding rally in the second.

Droun’s first goal came 11:45 into the second period, followed about a minute later by an Anton Stralman tally. Less than four minutes later, Drouin hit the 20-goal mark with the 4-4 marker on the power play.

First, check out Drouin’s first goal, which began the rally:

Next, witness the 4-4 goal, also by Drouin:

And … just like that, the Lightning tied things up. Wow.

Apparently Drouin created more offense than just his two goals, too:

Impressive. Remember when he seemed like he was out the door last season? Now that feels like another reminder not to give up on this group, no matter how ugly things look at times.

Video will be added when available.

Lightning give Vasilevskiy the (brief) hook after very rare Jurco goal

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By just about any measure, Monday’s been lousy to Tampa Bay Lightning goalie Andrei Vasilevskiy.

He was pulled with a few minutes remaining in the first period after Chicago Blackhawks built a 3-1 lead, scoring those three goals on just eight shots on net.

You could summarize Vasilevskiy’s awful start by those numbers, or by how rare the 3-1 goal was for the scorer.

Tomas Jurco failed to score a goal or an assist in 16 games with the Red Wings, then went pointless in nine more games with Chicago before finally scoring his first goal of the season on Monday.

Now, Jon Cooper didn’t pull Vasilevskiy because Jurco scored that tally. Still, it rubs a little extra salt in his wounds all things considered.

Here’s the Jurco goal:

Patrick Kane‘s 2-1 goal might have hurt the most, actually, as it quickly dissolved a tying tally by Ondrej Palat:

Update: The Lightning decided to put Vasilevskiy back in net to begin the second period. Interesting.