Dean Lombardi,

Firing Terry Murray wasn’t easy for Dean Lombardi


Los Angeles Kings GM Dean Lombardi might not work in a hockey fishbowl like Brian Burke does, but he’s just as fiery as the oft-quoted Leafs executive. Lombardi is also intensely loyal, so it should be no surprise that he hammered home how difficult it was to fire head coach Terry Murray in a conference call transcribed by Rich Hammond.

“I don’t think words can ever describe how hard something like this is,” Lombardi said. “You’re talking about, first off, a really good man. As far as a coach, if you look at what he’s done for us, he really stabilized this franchise, pointed it in the right direction. He taught these players a lot. When they look back, they’re going to realize they learned a lot from him.”

Lombardi’s guarding his choices

Lombardi said that he hasn’t spoken much with interim head coach John Stevens and justified suspicions that the Kings might hire a different bench boss. He said that there’s “no timetable” for that move and evaded questions about Darryl Sutter’s candidacy by simply implying that there’s a “very short list” of the possible choices he has in mind.

Making players accountable

As much as he lingered on the difficulty of canning Murray – even if he admitted that it was building in that direction rather than hitting him like “a ton of bricks” – Lombardi was critical of the players. Perhaps most interestingly, he deflected some of the criticism of the work of the team’s younger guys and looked at the group as a whole.

“I saw it with Marleau, Stuart and Nabokov, but it’s collectively across the board here,” Lombardi said. “You can’t just say it’s the young players. The Stolls, the Williams, the Greenes, the Browns, certainly have to look at themselves as much as the young players.’’

Dustin Brown ranks as one of the players who will be called upon to respond the most. He doesn’t have the all-world skills of Drew Doughty or Anze Kopitar, but he wears the captain’s “C” on his chest and needs to do more. He’s currently on a four-game pointless streak, so a coaching change might just light his fire like it did for David Backes, a similarly bombastic captain who’s currently on climbing the two-way forward ranks in St. Louis.

This time around, Murray was the fall guy. If the Kings’ disappointments continue, then some of those criticized players and even the outspoken GM could be next, though.

Glencross released from another PTO, this time by Avs

Washington Capitals v Ottawa Senators
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Curtis Glencross’ hard-luck preseason continued on Monday, as the Avalanche announced they released him from his training camp tryout.

Glencross had previously been cut from Toronto’s camp, which he described as “kind of a shock” move. Following that release, the 32-year-old quickly shifted to Colorado but arrived fairly late in the overall process, and only got a bit of exposure before being let go.

While some thought yesterday’s trade of Freddie Hamilton to Calgary may have opened up a spot for Glencross, the Avs now appear to be going in a different direction.

A two-time 20-goal scorer that netted 13 in 71 games last year, it’s unclear what lies ahead for Glencross.

Slepyshev earns final Oilers roster spot; Draisaitl to AHL

Anton Slepyshev, Anton Lander
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The Edmonton Oilers have assigned center Leon Draisaitl to AHL Bakersfield.

The demotion of Draisaitl, 19, means 21-year-old rookie Anton Slepyshev has made the opening-day roster after scoring twice and adding two assists in exhibition action.

The Oilers experimented during the preseason with Draisaitl, a natural center, on the wing. He didn’t have a particularly poor camp, finishing with one goal and three assists in six games.

But Slepyshev apparently impressed more.

“He’s a young player but he’s played pro hockey before,” coach Todd McLellan told the Edmonton Journal. “You can see it.”

Slepyshev played 58 games in the KHL last season, scoring 15 goals for Salavat Yulaev Ufa.