Brendan Shanahan

Welcome to the age of “heightened sensitivity to the well-being” of NHL goalies


Did Brendan Shanahan get new marching orders at today’s GM meetings when it comes to protecting goalies?

Did you just throw acid in your face to avoid reading another post on this topic?

To answer the first question, it sure sounds like it. Shanahan attended today’s meeting in Toronto and said afterward that everyone “had a really good conversation” about the goalie-safety issue which came to the forefront after Milan Lucic collided with Ryan Miller on Saturday.

Now, in my experience, a “really good conversation” is a nice way of saying, “things got pretty heated.” (For example, “Rick had a really good conversation with his wife after he came back from Vegas without his wedding ring.”)

While I doubt anyone was throwing tables and chairs around, Shanahan clearly heard from parties who thought Lucic got off too easily.

“The general managers expressed to me the importance of all the players on the ice, but also the extreme importance of the goaltender,” said Shanahan.

Shanahan was then asked, if the same Lucic-Miller play were to happen again, would the player in Lucic’s position be suspended?

“I look at each and every play individually,” he said. “All I can say rather than going back and retrying any of my old cases or any cases from previous years, I think that some people in the room felt it should have been a suspension and some people in the room felt that the right decision was made. Regardless, going forward certainly the direction and the conversation of the issue was certainly of a heightened sensitivity to the well-being of our goaltenders. As I’ve said many times, I’m not a policy maker, I’m a policy enforcer.”

Sounds like a yes to me. Otherwise Shanahan would have just said no, Lucic still wouldn’t be suspended. Instead, he said, “I’m not a policy maker, I’m a policy enforcer.”

So let’s put this in our pocket for the next time a goalie skates out of his crease and gets run over. Just because Lucic got off the hook with a minor penalty doesn’t mean the next guy will.

In Jets return, Burmistrov delivers headshot to Bergeron (Updated)

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Didn’t take long for Alex Burmistrov to make his presence felt — though not in a good way.

Burmistrov, playing in his first game for the Jets after a two-year stint in Russia, delivered a questionable elbow to the head of Boston’s Patrice Bergeron late in the first period of Thursday’s season-opener:

Burmistrov received a two-minute minor for an illegal check to the head, while Bergeron received a matching minor for roughing (retaliating for the elbow, specifically).

The Bruins went into the intermission leading 1-0, and have yet to update Bergeron’s status.

Update: Bergeron stayed in the game, but B’s head coach Claude Julien was none too pleased with the hit. Following the game, he called for the NHL’s Department of Player Safety to look at it…

Two-for-two: Another successful coach’s challenge as Sens reverse Kane’s goal

Dave Cameron
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Coaches are quickly getting the hang of this challenge thing.

Following Mike Babcock’s successful challenge in Toronto’s opening-night loss to Montreal on Wednesday, Babcock’s provincial rival — Sens head coach Dave Cameron — got it right as well, successfully reversing Evander Kane‘s would-be equalizer in the third period.

From the league:

At 10:34 of the third period in the Senators/Sabres game, Ottawa requested a Coach’s Challenge to review whether Buffalo was off-side prior to Evander Kane’s goal.

After reviewing all available replays and consulting with NHL Hockey Operations staff, the Linesman determined that Buffalo’s Zemgus Girgensons was off-side prior to the goal. According to Rule 78.7, “The standard for overturning the call in the event of a ‘GOAL’ call on the ice is that the Linesman, after reviewing any and all available replays and consulting with the Toronto Video Room, determines that one or more Players on the attacking team preceded the puck into the attacking zone prior to the goal being scored and that, as a result, the play should have been stopped for an “Off-side” infraction; where this standard is met, the goal will be disallowed.”

Therefore the original call is overturned – no goal Buffalo Sabres.

The clock is re-set to show 9:32 (10:28 elapsed time), when the off-side infraction occurred.

As the league later noted, this was the first coach’s challenge under the offside scenario.