hockey hall of fame 2011

What they’re saying about tonight’s Hockey Hall of Fame inductees

Tonight, the four newest members of the Hockey Hall of Fame — Doug Gilmour, Joe Nieuwendyk, Mark Howe and Ed Belfour — will be enshrined in a red-carpet affair tonight in Toronto. Here’s a smattering of quotes and opinions about the quartet from around the interweb…

This is as good a group as we’ve ever had going into the Hall of Fame.
— Bill Hay, HHOF Chairman.

Joe Nieuwendyk is one of the best draft stories ever. Cliff Fletcher has admitted that, in 1985, he wanted to take a goalie with the Flames’ second-round pick. With three teams selecting in front of the Flames, all of the keepers on his wish list were still available. New Jersey took Sean Burke 24th and Vancouver grabbed Troy Gamble 25th. That left one goalie (Kay Whitmore) who Fletcher liked, and, of course, Hartford took him 26th. With no one at that position remaining on their list, the Flames took Nieuwendyk. I love that.
— Elliotte Friedman, CBC’s Hockey Night in Canada.

Howe was nothing less than one of the greatest defensemen of his generation, and it was he, perhaps more than anyone else, who made the Flyers of the 1980s a perennial Stanley Cup contender. Howe’s play on the Philadelphia blue line looked an awful lot like Nicklas Lidstrom’s does on the Detroit blue line: near flawless through the use of positioning rather than body checking, virtually penalty-free, and with an effective attacking component that made him doubly good.
— Jeff Z. Klein, New York Times.

Here is the moment that tells you almost everything you need to know about Belfour, who will be enshrined in the Hockey Hall of Fame on Monday night in Toronto. In his first week at the Future Pro Goalie School in Strathroy, Ontario, [Belfour enrolled in 2004 after a playoff loss to Philly] Belfour was watching the other young netminders get ready for a 45-minute off-ice run on a nearby track. He asked [school operator Steve] McKichan if he could join them.

McKichan looked at Belfour, a man with a Stanley Cup ring, more money than he could ever spend, a place in the Hall of Fame waiting for him and wondered, “Seriously, dude?” Sure, McKichan said, go ahead.

Off they went. With about a lap and a half to go, some kid from Boston was leading the group and Belfour started a charge. In a mad dash, Belfour crossed the finish line ahead of the teenager.

“Eddie walked over to me and puked on my shoes,” McKichan recalled. “He looked up at me and said, ‘That kid will never beat me.’ And then he walked back into the arena. … He could barely talk. That, to me, is Ed Belfour.”
— Scott Burnside, ESPN.com.

Regardless of the outcomes, the lasting impression of Gilmour come playoffs was of Superman on skates, something the late Pat Burns once confirmed when he told reporters that Gilmour skipped an optional skate because he had to “go back to his planet and rest.”

The post-season stories emerging from the dressing room read like warrior’s tales with an exhausted Gilmour, reduced to 150 pounds, replenishing lost fluids intravenously and receiving injections to dull the pain in his feet.

Dogged. Determined. That was Dougie.
— Rob Sinclair, CBC.

Hay is right about this being a really good HHOF class. It’s not like 1983 (Ken Dryden, Bobby Hull, Stan Mikita) or 1979 (Bobby Orr, Henri Richard) — this group will be defined by its depth rather than individual superstars. Gilmour and Belfour were the hyper-competitive warriors, Nieuwendyk the consummate winner and Howe the under-appreciated star and son of hockey royalty.

That said, 2012 is primed to be an equally impressive class. Those that become eligible next year include Joe Sakic, Brendan Shanahan, Mats Sundin, Jeremy Roenick, Gary Roberts, Claude Lemieux…joining the likes of Pavel Bure, Eric Lindros, Dave Andreychuk and Adam Oates as guys that were overlooked in 2011.

Royal beating: Lucic, Kings crush Bruins 9-2

As Boston Bruins' Patrice Bergeron (37) looks on Los Angeles Kings' Milan Lucic waves to the crowd after a tribute to him was played on the screen during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Boston Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson)
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The Boston Bruins welcomed Milan Lucic back on Tuesday. Maybe they shouldn’t have extended such a warm welcome to the Los Angeles Kings overall, however.

You won’t see many games as lopsided as this one, at least in 2015-16, as the Kings walloped the Bruins by a humbling score of 9-2.

Lucic wasn’t just there, either, as he scored a goal and an assist in his quite triumphant return to Boston.

Tuukka Rask had a short night in Boston’s net, yet it wasn’t as if Jonas Gustavsson enjoyed his time. It was a pretty sound beating by all accounts.

This dominant win is a heck of a way for the Kings to begin an imposing seven-game road trip, which continues against the New York Islanders on Thursday. The Bruins probably want to burn the tape on this one themselves, as they’re about to head on a six-game road trip.

Video: Evander Kane believes he won his fights vs. Alex Petrovic

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The Florida Panthers are beating up the Buffalo Sabres where it counts – on the scoreboard – but Evander Kane was happy to highlight his perceived victories in a couple bouts.

Buffalo’s power forward fought Alex Petrovic twice on Tuesday, and Kane wasn’t shy about holding up a “2-0.”

You can watch the second fight above, and the first one below, via Hockey Fights by way of MSG:

This GIF might just say it all, really:

Update: Apparently they fought again moments after this post went up.

Probably safe to call it a rivalry between the two, right?

The Panthers ultimately won 7-4.

Fight video: Yes, a visor-breaking punch

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Some hockey players resist the urge to wear a visor, at least if they’re given that choice.

Perhaps a few will say “Hey, Nathan Beaulieu will just punch it off anyway.”

Maybe not, but Beaulieu provided a rather unique moment in his fight with Cedric Paquette during the Montreal Canadiens – Tampa Bay Lightning game. You can watch that bout in the video above, and see a cut on the Lightning pest’s face from that blow.

Want it in GIF form? OK then:

Sending a message: Flames scratch Gaudreau, Monahan, Bouma

Calgary Flames' Sean Monahan, left, celebrates his goal with teammate Johnny Gaudreau during the third period against the Carolina Hurricanes in an NHL hockey game Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016, in Calgary, Alberta. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press via AP)
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Sean Monahan and Johnny Gaudreau figure to be a big part of the Calgary Flames’ forward group, both in the present and the future.

That said, it the very specific present, they’ll be watching Tuesday’s game from the press box.

After an unsatisfactory practice amid flailing playoff hopes, Flames head coach Bob Hartley made a big statement tonight, taking Monahan, Gaudreau and Lance Bouma out of the lineup as healthy scratches against the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Wow.

It’s amusing timing, too, as the Maple Leafs will roll with a bit of a skeleton crew of their own after that splashy Dion Phaneuf trade.

Some background

Sportsnet’s Mark Spector was there for the practice, which was unusually short at 25 minutes.

“He wasn’t happy with the way we were practicing,” David Jones told Spector. “It’s a little embarrassing when we’re not (making) five-foot passes.

“I think he was pretty pissed off about the way things were looking.”

Call it a combination of poor execution and maybe a tardy arrival … perhaps from a Super Bowl party or two?