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Paul Maurice doesn’t think Eric Staal gave his brother a concussion


It should be a scholarly affair tonight when the Rangers host the ‘Canes at MSG.

New York coach Dr. John Tortorella (who diagnosed Mike Rupp’s torn meniscus as as “cranky knee'”) will match wits with Carolina coach Dr. Paul Maurice, a leader in the field of neurological research.

Maurice, after all, enlightened reporters today by explaining how Rangers defenseman Marc Staal didn’t suffer his concussion. From Pat Leonard of the New York Daily News:


That’s a rather interesting take. See, Marc has spoken publicly about Eric delivering the hit that concussed him. So to has Eric. “It’s tough for him, it’s tough for me and it’s tough for everybody in the family,” he told “They feel for Marc and they feel for me, being put in that spot.”

The rest of the Staals have weighed in as well. The family patriarch, Henry, said last month that “it wasn’t good” to see Marc get hit. Pittsburgh Penguins center Jordan said last month that “I feel bad for both my brothers.”

Tortorella confirmed Marc suffered a concussion on the play. The only reason the Rangers didn’t disclose it immediately was to protect him, a move which came under some scrutiny after Marc returned to the lineup three games later. (He also played the remainder of the season and playoffs, which could’ve partly fueled Maurice’s comments.)

Heck, even Maurice has spoken about the hit on previous occasions. He told he thought it was clean, but the result was bad. The big difference, though, between Maurice’s past statement and his current stance is that he never previously suggested the Staal-on-Staal hit didn’t cause the concussion.

It’s an odd stance to take. Especially when you watch the hit again…

…and wonder just what Maurice is trying to accomplish with these comments. Does he really believe Eric’s hit didn’t give Marc a concussion? Or is he trying to take the pressure off his captain, mired in an absolutely awful slump?

Whatever the case, I’m guessing Maurice will regret saying what he did. Concussions in hockey is already controversial subject — one that certainly doesn’t need coaches weighing in with their (highly unqualified) diagnoses.

Avs unveil new third jerseys

Avs Jerseys

The Avalanche will be throwing a bunch of different looks at us this season.

Having already released specialized “Mile High” jerseys for February’s Stadium Series game, the Avs unveiled new third sweaters on Friday — less than 24 hours after a bitter 5-4 home loss to Minnesota in their season opener.

(Guess Colorado wanted to send out some good vibes after blowing a 4-1 third-period lead.)

While undoubtedly exciting for the organization, the release of these new thirds isn’t taking anybody by surprise. Last month, several websites published leaked images of Colorado’s and Anaheim’s third jerseys, so the design has been in the public eye for several weeks.

The Avs will debut these new thirds on Oct. 24, in a Saturday night tilt against Columbus.

Related: Roy explains why he didn’t call time out

Report: Escrow set at 16 percent

Gary Bettman, Donald Fehr
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Hey, remember in June when the NHLPA voted to keep the five-percent growth factor in spite of increasing worries about escrow?

Well, here’s why that decision was a significant one, via TSN’s Frank Seravalli:

With early revenue projections in place, the NHL and NHLPA set the escrow withholding rate for players at 16 per cent for the first quarter of the season on Thursday.

That means every player will have 16 per cent of earnings deducted from their paycheque and put aside until after all of this season’s hockey-related revenue is counted to ensure a perfect 50-50 revenue split with owners.

Now, this doesn’t mean that the players will definitely lose 16 percent of their salaries. Typically, they receive refunds when all the accounting is done.

Still, 16 percent is a good-sized chunk to withhold. They won’t be thrilled about it.

Related: To understand escrow, consider Duncan Keith