Jeremy M. Jacobs

Forbes profiles the NHL’s billionaire owners

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Interesting piece here from Tom Van Riper of Forbes Magazine about the 10 billionaire NHL owners.

(That’s 10 NHL owners that are classified as billionaires, of course. Not NHL owners that are worth $10 billion. I don’t think there are many of those.)

According to the piece, the NHL has just one fewer billionaire owner than the NBA, “where the median franchise value is about 67% higher.” The leagues share two billionaires — Philip Anschutz (Kings/Lakers) and Stan Kroenke (Avalanche/Nuggets) — which means the NHL has eight other billionaires we haven’t mentioned yet.

How many more times can I write the word billionaire? Keep reading to find out!

[NB: Just to reiterate, this is all from the Forbes list.]

Jeremy Jacobs, Boston Bruins

Jacobs’ net worth is an estimated $1.9 billion, made primarily through his food and hospitality company (Delaware North). He took control of the Bruins in 1975 and later made two key hires that played an integral role in the recent Stanley Cup Championship: GM Peter Chiarelli and President Cam Neely. Getting rid of Harry Sinden as GM was also a shrewd move.

Ronald Burkle, Pittsburgh Penguins

Burkle co-owns the Pens with Mario Lemieux. His estimated net worth is $3.2 billion, made in part from the supermarket game (and we’re not talking about bagging groceries.) That said, Burkle seems to have dabbled in all sorts of business ventures, which you can read about here.

Philip Falcone, Minnesota Wild

Founder of the Harbinger Group, Falcone’s net worth is believed to be at $2.2 billion (putting him at No. 188 on the Forbes 400.) He grew up in Minnesota and played hockey at Harvard. His pet potbellied pig has its own room in his Manhattan town house. Seriously.

Mike Ilitch, Detroit Red Wings

The owner of the Red Wings and Detroit Tigers founded Little Caesars Pizza in 1959, shortly after a knee injury ended his minor-league baseball career. His current net worth is $2 billion. He was inducted into the NHL Hockey Hall of Fame in 2003 and the US Hockey Hall of Fame in 2004.

Terry Pegula, Buffalo Sabres

Pegula made his fortune ($3.1 billion) in gas drilling, then spent most of it on Christian Ehrhoff.

N. Murray Edwards, Calgary Flames

Edwards is a “self-made oil and gas tycoon” which is also his official title on business cards. It’s a real hit with the ladies. In addition to natural resources, he owns a series of ski resorts and co-owns the hockey team through Calgary Flames, L.P.

Daryl Katz, Edmonton Oilers

Katz (pronounced “Kates”) is Canada’s 16th wealthiest citizen. He’s the chairman and CEO of The Katz Group, Canada’s leading drug store operator — not coincidentally, the Oilers play at Rexall Place. Katz has been in the news recently as the city of Edmonton recently signed off on funding for a new arena deal.

Henry Samueli, Anaheim Ducks

Samueli is the co-founder, senior VP and CTO of the Broadcom Corporation. He bought the Mighty Ducks from Disney in 2005, dropped the “Mighty” in 2006 and won a Stanley Cup in 2007. Clearly, this is a guy that gets results. He’s worth $1.7 billion.

Video: Penguins coach takes issue with late, high Orpik hit on Maatta

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The Pittsburgh Penguins have spoken out against a late, high hit that Washington Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik threw on Olli Maatta early in the first period of an eventful Game 2 on Saturday.

Maatta left and didn’t return. He played only 31 seconds, and the Penguins were reduced to five defensemen for a large portion of the game. Orpik was given a minor penalty on the play, but the league’s Department of Player Safety may see it differently.

The hit occurred well after Maatta had gotten rid of the puck. He struggled on his way to the dressing room for further evaluation.

Based on multiple reports, Orpik wasn’t made available to the media following the game, which went to the Penguins as they earned the split on the road.

But the Penguins have taken issue with the hit.

“I thought it was a late hit,” said Penguins coach Mike Sullivan, as per CSN Mid-Atlantic. “I thought it was a target to his head. I think it’s the type of hit everyone in hockey is trying to remove from the game.”

Game on: Penguins even series with rival Capitals

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The Pittsburgh Penguins will head back home with a split of their second-round series with the rival Washington Capitals.

Former Capitals forward Eric Fehr came back to burn his hold team, as he scored with under five minutes remaining in regulation to help lift the Penguins over Washington with a 2-1 victory in an eventful Game 2 on Saturday. Evgeni Malkin threw the puck toward the net and Fehr was able to re-direct it by Braden Holtby.

Oh, this was an eventful game, indeed.

It started early in the first period with Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik catching Penguins blue liner Olli Maatta with a late and high hit that warranted — at least for now — only a minor penalty for interference. Maatta, clearly in distress following the hit, didn’t play another shift and saw only 31 seconds of ice time in total, as Pittsburgh was reduced to five defensemen for the remainder of the game.

It continued in the third period. Kris Letang was furious after getting called for a trip on Justin Williams, and even more ticked off when the Capitals tied the game on the ensuing power play.

For two periods, the Capitals couldn’t get much going. Only four of their players had registered a shot on goal through 40 minutes, while the Penguins held the edge in that department and held the lead.

Washington came out with more jump in the third period, testing rookie netminder Matt Murray with 14 shots in the final 20 minutes. But the Penguins got the late goal to break the deadlock.

Video: Penguins’ Letang was furious after Capitals tie up Game 2 with power play goal

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Kris Letang watched from the penalty box as the Washington Capitals tied up Game 2 with a power play goal in the third period. The Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman was called for tripping after he appeared to muscle Justin Williams off the puck as he entered the zone.

Letang let his disagreement with the call be known at the time, and was furious after the Capitals capitalized on a goal from Marcus Johansson.

The Capitals started the period down a goal and being outshot 28-10 by the Penguins, who need a win to even the series.

Also, it seems this is worth mentioning:

Video: Hagelin goes top shelf to give Penguins the lead in Game 2

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In their quest to even the series, the Pittsburgh Penguins had done a nice job through two periods of suffocating the Washington Capitals, while gaining the lead on a beautiful goal.

Carl Hagelin took advantage of a vast amount of space that opened up in front of the Washington net, finishing off a nice pass from Nick Bonino, burying his shot just under the cross bar on the glove side of Braden Holtby.

Through two periods, the Penguins were outshooting Washington 28-10. Only four Capitals players — Alex Ovechkin, T.J. Oshie, Evgeny Kuznetsov and Matt Niskanen — had registered shots on goal.