Roberto Luongo

Now they’re comparing Luongo to Nowitzki


A week ago, we compared Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo to Donovan McNabb, the former Philadelphia Eagles quarterback who came close to leading his team to a championship but could never quite get over the hump.

If that comparison was depressing for Canucks fans (or uplifting for non-Canucks fans), Vancouver Province columnist Tony Gallagher is thinking of another professional athlete whose story had a much happier ending than McNabb’s in Philadelphia.

As Roberto Luongo listens to the general howl around him he should look across to the NBA and the career of Dirk Nowitzki for fuel to propel him forward.

And those who look at the evidence to date and feel that Luongo just doesn’t have a championship in him had better be prepared to dine on those words if he ever does pull it off. Because that’s what Nowitzki was able to do for the Dallas Mavericks this spring, the parallels in the careers of these two athletes absolutely breathtaking.

I’m not sure if I’d use the word breathtaking (mostly because I associate it with the ugly baby in Seinfeld), but as Gallagher points out, the similarities are indeed compelling.

Both have been considered outstanding players with great regular seasons but too fragile mentally to get it done in the crucible of the playoffs. Prior to this past NBA final, both players had reached the finals in their respective leagues and in that final both teams led by their respective stars Luongo and Nowitzki had gone out to 2-0 leads in that final (and here we refer to the ’06 NBA final between Dallas and Miami). Both teams were even in good shape in game three on the road, the Mavs with a double-digit lead, the Canucks having survived Aaron Rome’s major and the Bruins initial thrust to get out of period one scoreless.

Both teams and both players melted down and eventually lost their respective series under circumstances that seemed to have an odd officiating twist.

And you wonder why Canucks fans are always saying Gary Bettman is out to get their team. Much of it is media driven. But we won’t get into that now.

Comparing one athlete to another can be a useful exercise. In this case, it serves to illustrate the fact we can’t predict the future. In Philadelphia, there were people who said McNabb would never get it done, and they were right. In Dallas, there were people who said Nowitzki would never get it done, and they were wrong.

But comparing one athlete to another provides proof of absolutely nothing. Luongo isn’t McNabb. He’s not Nowitzki either. He’s Luongo. And perhaps more importantly, the Canucks aren’t the Eagles or the Mavericks. Which is to say, “See? Nowitzki won a championship” is a feeble argument if you’re trying to convince someone the Canucks can win the Stanley Cup with Luongo in goal. (Not that Gallagher’s making that argument.)

It’s still interesting though, because it shows one of the main reasons we follow sports. Because we have no idea what’s coming next. Luongo had another rough outing last night in Edmonton. No word if he’ll start tonight versus the Blues. See? We have no idea!

Report: Torres won’t appeal 41-game suspension

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Sounds like Raffi Torres is accepting his punishment.

Per Sportsnet, Torres won’t appeal his 41-game suspension for an illegal hit to the head of Anaheim’s Jakob Silfverberg.

The report comes just days after the NHL’s Department of Player Safety levied one of the longest disciplinary rulings in league history, citing both the severity of the Silfverberg hit and Torres’ lengthy history of suspensions, fines and warnings.

There was some thought, however, that Torres would try to challenge the ruling.


He does have a history of success in that department. In 2012,Torres successfully appealed his suspension for a headshot on Chicago’s Marian Hossa, and had his punishment reduced from 25 games to 21.

Torres also isn’t considered a “repeat offender” under the current collective bargaining agreement, as his last suspension came in 2013.

Of course, part of that clean record is due to the fact he hasn’t played much. Torres has largely been sidelined by injury for the last two seasons, missing all of last year with knee problems.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman delved further into the repeat offender thing in his latest 30 Thoughts column:

If you read the relevant sections of the CBA, the league takes the position that the repeat offender status is only applicable to fines. Repeaters are fined on a per-game basis, non-repeaters on a per-day basis. (The former is more expensive, because there are fewer games than days in an NHL season.) However, if you go to Section 18.2, among the factors taken into account are, “the status of the offender and, specifically, whether the Player has a history of being subject to Supplementary Discipline for On-Ice Conduct.”

So, in the NHL’s view, a player’s history is relevant, even if longer than 18 months ago.

Should the report prove accurate and Torres doesn’t appeal, he will be eligible to return to action on Jan. 14, when the Sharks take on the Oilers.

Report: Kings, Richards nearing settlement

Mike Richards
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The Los Angeles Kings and Mike Richards may be nearing a settlement in their dispute over Richards’ terminated contract, TSN’s Bob McKenzie is reporting.

You can read the report for all the details, but we’re sure curious about this part:

If a settlement is reached, there’s no word yet on what salary cap penalties the Kings would still face. There’s bound to be something, but not likely as onerous as the full value of Richards’ contract, which carries with it a cap hit of $5.75 million. If there’s a settlement, Richards would undoubtedly become a free agent though there’s no telling at this point what monies he would be entitled to from the Kings in a settlement.

The issue here is precedent, and what this case could set. The NHL and NHLPA can’t allow teams to escape onerous contracts through a back door, and many are adamant that that’s what the Kings were attempting to do in Richards’ case.