Pittsburgh Penguins v New Jersey Devils

Fight night: Arron Asham drops Jay Beagle, taunts afterwards


Fighting is a tough way to make a living in the NHL. As if there were ever any doubt that hockey players willing to stick up for their teammates are manly men, Arron Asham gave us a clear reminder. Actually, its Washington’s Jay Beagle that reminded us that sticking up for teammates is a commendable way to make a living. Asham was the reminder why it’s such a tough way to collect a paycheck in the 3rd period of the Capitals’ OT victory over the Penguins.

Here’s the scene: Caps forward Jay Beagle hits Kris Letang and knocks off his lid. Penguins’ tough guy Arron Asham confronts Beagle for laying a big hit on one of his skilled teammates, and Beagle unfortunately obliges the request to drop the gloves. As most people will tell you—this is part of hockey. Asham confronted Beagle because that’s his job in the NHL. Beagle accepted the Asham’s request because, well, that’s what hockey players do. He’s a veteran of only 42 career games and he’s desperately trying to make solidify his spot on the Capitals roster.

Two punches to the face, a lost tooth, and a bloody face later and Beagle may have wanted to rethink his decision. Here’s the video, but beware: there’s about a quart of Beagle’s blood on the ice after the fight.

Aside from the clear knockout, the fight made waves around the internet because of Asham’s perceived actions after the fight.  As if the Pens/Caps rivalry needed any more fuel.

“Asham appeared to taunt Beagle on the way to the penalty box, gesturing that he was ‘asleep,’ but tapped his stick in the penalty box when Beagle, a significantly less experienced fighter, left the ice.”

There was some argument whether Asham had done anything wrong—but afterwards the Pens’ forward confirmed that he did, in fact, taunt after the fight. He took the post-game questions and explained that his own actions after the fight were “classless,” “uncalled for,” and that he was “caught up in the moment.” The actions were classless and uncalled for, but owning the mistake after the game was a stand-up move.

What do you think? Do you think Arron Asham’s post-fight gesture was uncalled for or do you give him the benefit of the doubt because he was caught up in the moment? Do his postgame comments influence your thoughts at all? Let us know what you have in the comments.

Update (1:05am EST): Alexander Ovechkin offered his thoughts after the game: “It’s a hockey game, but that was pretty tough. Beagle … he’s not a fighter, he’s just, it’s not his job to fight. I don’t know, it’s kind of unrespectful for players on a different team.” (Video link)

Avs unveil new third jerseys

Avs Jerseys

The Avalanche will be throwing a bunch of different looks at us this season.

Having already released specialized “Mile High” jerseys for February’s Stadium Series game, the Avs unveiled new third sweaters on Friday — less than 24 hours after a bitter 5-4 home loss to Minnesota in their season opener.

(Guess Colorado wanted to send out some good vibes after blowing a 4-1 third-period lead.)

While undoubtedly exciting for the organization, the release of these new thirds isn’t taking anybody by surprise. Last month, several websites published leaked images of Colorado’s and Anaheim’s third jerseys, so the design has been in the public eye for several weeks.

The Avs will debut these new thirds on Oct. 24, in a Saturday night tilt against Columbus.

Related: Roy explains why he didn’t call time out

Report: Escrow set at 16 percent

Gary Bettman, Donald Fehr
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Hey, remember in June when the NHLPA voted to keep the five-percent growth factor in spite of increasing worries about escrow?

Well, here’s why that decision was a significant one, via TSN’s Frank Seravalli:

With early revenue projections in place, the NHL and NHLPA set the escrow withholding rate for players at 16 per cent for the first quarter of the season on Thursday.

That means every player will have 16 per cent of earnings deducted from their paycheque and put aside until after all of this season’s hockey-related revenue is counted to ensure a perfect 50-50 revenue split with owners.

Now, this doesn’t mean that the players will definitely lose 16 percent of their salaries. Typically, they receive refunds when all the accounting is done.

Still, 16 percent is a good-sized chunk to withhold. They won’t be thrilled about it.

Related: To understand escrow, consider Duncan Keith