Dallas Stars v Phoenix Coyotes

2011-2012 season preview: Dallas Stars

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2010-2011 record: 42-29-11, 95 points; 5th in Pacific, 9th in West

Playoffs: Did not qualify

It’s never a good thing when ownership is a major storyline around a team. For the last few seasons, the Dallas Stars ownership has been a problem as the team has and an internal budget and has not been able to spend money like they used to. After narrowly missing the playoffs and losing their most dynamic player, Dallas acquired a new coach and handful of players as they look to transform the face of their team. Needless to say: transition can be tough.

Offense

In recent years, the offense has been the strongest part of the Stars’ lineup. They started last season with James Neal, Brad Richards, and Loui Eriksson creating one of the most dangerous lines in the entire NHL. A year later, Richards is the newest multi-millionaire in on Broadway and Neal has long since been traded to Pittsburgh for help on the blue line. The Stars will ask Mike Ribeiro to move up in the lineup to top-line center with captain Brendan Morrow and newly acquired Michael Ryder on his wings. Loui Eriksson will play with 22-year-old budding star Jamie Benn on another scoring line — potentially with uber-pest Steve Ott. After the top two lines, there’s a huge drop off in offensive talent on the third and forth lines this season. What was a strength only a season ago could be the Achilles’ heel this year.

Defense

Unlike the offense, the Stars defense is in a better position that it was at this time last season. Stephane Robidas is one of the most underrated defensemen in the league and Alex Goligoski showed that he just needed some playing time after he was acquired from the Penguins. Niklas Grossman looks like a solid second pairing defenseman and Trevor Daley continues to tease with potential. Newcomers Sheldon Souray and Adam Pardy will fill depth roles and will join Mark Fistric as bottom pairing defenseman. The Stars bottom pairing guys were a liability at the beginning of last season. They shouldn’t be a huge problem this season.

Goalies

Kari Lehtonen had a breakout season last year proving that he was capable of carrying an NHL team for the majority of the season. The injury-plagued netminder appeared in 69 games last season and posted a decent 2.55 goals against and .914 save percentage. It wasn’t just his numbers that looked good – although they were good – it was the quality of the saves that he was able to make that made him so valuable to the Stars last season. On more than one night during the season, the Stars defense left Lehtonen alone to keep the team in the game. More often than not, he answered the bell. For that matter, Andrew Raycroft came in and showed that he can be an adequate back-up.

Coaching

Glen Gulutzan takes over for Marc Crawford behind the bench in Dallas. The first-time NHL coach has had great success in both the AHL (Texas Stars) and ECHL (Las Vegas Wranglers). Expect the Starts to play with much more defensive structure than they did while Crawford was at the helm. To a man, all of the players who played under him in Austin believe that he’s the right man for the job. Now it’s time to prove it.

Breakout candidate

Watch for Goligoski to take the Western Conference by storm this season. The ‘other guy’ in the James Neal trade showed in the second half that he has the potential to be a work-horse in Dallas. He’ll play big time minutes on the power play and his underrated defensive play will allow Gulutzan to play him in every situation. He never really got the chance to play extended minutes in Pittsburgh because of their depth on the blueline. He won’t have that problem in Dallas. Look for Goligoski to be among the top 10 in defensemen scoring this year.

Best-case scenario

The Stars can hope to have the same type of season that they just completed. They were in a playoff spot for the majority of the season and if it weren’t for a loss on the last day of the season, would have snuck into the 8th spot. Benn will have to step into a larger role this year and a full season with Goligoski will help solidify the blueline. If things fall right, the Stars may find themselves in the same position next April fighting for one of the last playoff spots.

Reality

Losing Richards creates a gigantic hole on the top line. There’s no other way to put it — a team that depended on their scoring last season lost their best scorer. The team challenged up until the last day of the season for a playoff spot last year, but this season looks like it could be a step backwards for the Stars. Look for them to finish fourth in the Pacific Division (an improvement from last season), but chances are they won’t be battling down the stretch for a playoff spot. Think less about the eighth or ninth seed and more along the lines of the 12th spot.

Get to know Nolan Patrick, early favorite to go first in 2017 NHL Draft

KELOWNA, CANADA - OCTOBER 25: Rourke Chartier #14 of Kelowna Rockets faces off against Nolan Patrick #19 of Brandon Wheat Kings during the first period on October 25, 2014 at Prospera Place in Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada. (Photo by Marissa Baecker/Getty Images)
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The NHL’s Central Scouting staff put out a full list of 2017 NHL Draft “futures” on Saturday, supporting the notion that it’s never too early to hype up the next wave of prospects.

At the moment, the top pick speculation revolves around Nolan Patrick of the Brandon Wheat Kings, including in NHL.com’s breakdown of the biggest names among those futures.

In vague terms, his size and willingness to go to high-danger areas distinguishes Patrick. Scoring 102 points in 72 games in the WHL with the Wheat Kings doesn’t hurt his cause, either.

It’s only natural to seek comparables, of course, and there are plenty streaming out already.

Craig Button compares Nolan to Jonathan Toews in this introduction for TSN:

Nolan’s style of play is similar to that of fellow Manitoban Jonathan Toews. He’s skilled, smart and capable of playing and making a difference in all situations of the game. Like Toews, he does it without much flash, but brings significant determination and reliability every time he steps on the ice. 

Meanwhile, his coach compared his style to that of Brayden Schenn, as Buzzing the Net noted in February.

There’s hockey in his blood, too, as his father Steve Patrick was an NHL forward.

Maybe that explains the notable lack of fawning from his dad in this Sportsnet article.

“Nolan was a funny little player at eight. I certainly didn’t look at him and think he’s gonna be a special player,” Steve Patrick said in May. “But he always saw the ice well and even when he was little he could pass the puck. He was a smaller kid and he sometimes played up a year, so I thought he had to be little sneakier to hold on to the puck.

“Plus, he had an older sister who could throw him in a snowbank, so he had to figure a way to keep the puck from her.”

Now that is a scouting report.

Speaking of scouting reports, NHL.com and Sportsnet both discuss other players who will jockey for top draft position with Patrick.

Of course, plenty can change in the season, so Patrick must dodge hurdles as if they were siblings readying to “throw him in a snowbank.”

Related: Nolan Patrick, potential No. 1 overall pick in 2017, undergoes sports hernia surgery

There is a report about Islanders eyeing a new arena in Nassau, too

UNIONDALE, NY - MAY 05:  A closeup of arena workers tools used to help remove the ice and the rink from the Nassau Coliseum on May 5, 2015 in Uniondale, New York. The New York Islanders have played their last game at the Nassau Coliseum and will begin to play at the Barclay's Center in the Brooklyn borough of New York City next season.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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The New York Islanders’ new owners claim that Brooklyn’s Barclays Center is “our home,” yet there are all kinds of rumors going around about where they may settle.

Things really heated up with talks of moving next to the New York Mets with a new arena in Queens, but apparently that’s not all.

New York Newsday reports that the Islanders have met “several times” with the New York Racing Association to build a new arena in Belmont. This would mean that the Islanders would (wait for it) bring the team back to the Nassau area.

It was emphasized that such talks were in early stages and that the ownership group is “weighing multiple options, including remaining in Brooklyn.”

When it came to the rumors about Queens, more than a few people believed that it may have come down to leveraging Barclays for a better situation in Brooklyn. The Isles’ ownership group hasn’t discussed these rumors, so it’s difficult to gauge how seriously the team would consider moving again.

In the grand scheme of things, it feels far too early to get too excited or bent out of shape about these murmurs. Even if something significant happens – and there have been plenty of gripes about Barclays – it sounds like it would take some time for plans to formulate.

Coyotes’ defensive makeover continues with Luke Schenn signing

SAN JOSE, CA - APRIL 20:  Luke Schenn #52 of the Los Angeles Kings in action against the San Jose Sharks in Game Four of the Western Conference First Round during the NHL 2016 Stanley Cup Playoffs at SAP Center on April 20, 2016 in San Jose, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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While Brayden Schenn hopes to hammer out a favorable deal with the Philadelphia Flyers, his brother Luke Schenn inked a two-year contract with the Arizona Coyotes on Saturday.

Arizona didn’t confirm these details, but the cap hit looks to be $1.25 million, according to reporters including Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman.

“We are very pleased to sign Luke to a two-year contract,” New Coyotes GM John Chayka said. “He’s a good, young defenseman and we feel we can optimize his performance here. He will be a solid addition to our blue line.”

Chayka is making some significant changes to the Coyotes’ blueline, even if Oliver Ekman-Larsson is still the star of that group.

The Coyotes traded for and then signed Alex Goligoski. They possibly grabbed a falling star in the draft, too, as they selected Jacob Chychrun. Adding Schenn might not be the last move, either.

Schenn isn’t necessarily an analytics darling, but a two-year, $2.5 million deal is reasonable even with some flaws. This contract seems even more reasonable when you consider the five-year, $18 million deal that just expired.

Report: Maple Leafs, Holland are about $1M apart

TORONTO, ON - APRIL 11: Peter Holland #24 of the Toronto Maple Leafs skates up the ice during NHL action against the Montreal Canadiens at the Air Canada Centre April 11, 2015 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  (Photo by Abelimages/Getty Images)
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Peter Holland‘s submitted salary request for arbitration is reportedly more than double what the Toronto Maple Leafs proposed.

With that in mind, Monday’s pending hearing serves as a challenging deadline.

Holland’s asking for $2.1 million in 2016-17 while Toronto is offering $900K, according to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman.

This comes a day after the Maple Leafs placed Holland on waivers, advancing the argument that he’d be worthy of a two-way deal. He cleared waivers today.

Granted, the Globe & Mail’s James Mirtle wonders if Holland would clear waivers under normal circumstances:

Holland is a solid player, generating 27 points in 65 games with Toronto last season. He’s a nice enough piece, but with the Maple Leafs in rebuild mode, they’re not exactly anxious to pay supporting cast members more than necessary.

With such a context in mind, it should be intriguing to see how much either side will budge.

At the moment, the Maple Leafs seem to hold the advantage.