Bodog picks Canucks to face Capitals in 2012 Stanley Cup finals

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With the 2011-12 season rapidly approaching, the hockey world approaches what is delightful to some and stomach-churning to others: season previews time. After a summer full of changes, pundits and hockey fans alike will attempt to forecast the future so that they can prove their brilliance (or ability to make lucky guesses, depending upon who you ask).

Bragging rights are great and all, but some hope to parlay their crystal ball skills into some cash. That’s where gambling venues/Web sites come in, but for the rest of us, gambling odds can provide an interesting take on public opinion.

They can tell us all sorts of things. Which teams are the obvious favorites? Are there some clubs who might be dark horse candidates? Perhaps most amusingly, which clubs do people have virtually zero confidence in?

Bodog is one of the leading sites for such speculation, so here’s a look at their odds for the 2011-12 champions – along with the expected conference winners. (This backs up Bodog’s early odds following the 2011 Stanley Cup finals in mid-June, while factoring in off-season moves. Thanks to Neil Greenberg for pointing out a correction.)

Let’s start with the coin toss for the Stanley Cup winner first.

Odds to win the 2012 Stanley Cup

Vancouver Canucks                   7/1
Washington Capitals                  7/1
Boston Bruins                            10/1
Pittsburgh Penguins                   10/1
Philadelphia Flyers                     11/1
San Jose Sharks                       11/1
Chicago Blackhawks                  12/1
Detroit Red Wings                      12/1
Los Angeles Kings                     14/1
Tampa Bay Lightning                  16/1
Buffalo Sabres                           18/1
Anaheim Ducks                         25/1
Montreal Canadiens                   25/1
Nashville Predators                    28/1
New Jersey Devils                      30/1
New York Rangers                     30/1
Phoenix Coyotes                       35/1
St. Louis Blues                          35/1
Calgary Flames                         40/1
Dallas Stars                              40/1
Carolina Hurricanes                    45/1
Toronto Maple Leafs                   50/1
Winnipeg Jets                            60/1
Colorado Avalanche                    65/1
Edmonton Oilers                        65/1
Ottawa Senators                        70/1
Columbus Blue Jackets              75/1
Florida Panthers                        75/1
Minnesota Wild                          75/1
New York Islanders                    80/1

It’s interesting to see the Islanders in last place, but maybe that’s just a summer’s worth of optimism about that team talking. The Red Wings, Rangers and Devils are interesting choices for teams that are slightly underrated, while some might upset that the defending champion Boston Bruins came in third place.

Moving on, here are the odds-on winners for the Western Conference.

Odds to win the 2012 NHL Western Conference

Vancouver Canucks                   3/1
Detroit Red Wings                      11/2
San Jose Sharks                       11/2
Los Angeles Kings                     6/1
Chicago Blackhawks                  13/2
Anaheim Ducks                         12/1
Nashville Predators                    14/1
Phoenix Coyotes                       18/1
Calgary Flames                         20/1
Dallas Stars                              20/1
St. Louis Blues                          20/1
Colorado Avalanche                    35/1
Columbus Blue Jackets              35/1
Edmonton Oilers                        35/1
Minnesota Wild                          35/1

The Avalanche and Wild seem like they have a better chance to win the conference than the Blue Jackets and Oilers, in my opinion. It’s interesting to see that the Kings are doing pretty well in both areas – does this mean that gamblers aren’t worried about Drew Doughty’s contract situation?

Finally, here are the East odds.

Odds to win the 2012 NHL Eastern Conference

Washington Capitals                  4/1
Pittsburgh Penguins                   9/2
Philadelphia Flyers                     5/1
Boston Bruins                            11/2
Tampa Bay Lightning                  8/1
Buffalo Sabres                           10/1
Montreal Canadiens                   14/1
New Jersey Devils                      15/1
New York Rangers                     16/1
Carolina Hurricanes                    24/1
Toronto Maple Leafs                   28/1
Winnipeg Jets                            35/1
Florida Panthers                        40/1
Ottawa Senators                        40/1
New York Islanders                    45/1

Strangely enough, the Bruins are ranked lower in the East odds (fourth) than they are to win the Stanley Cup (tied for third). The Panthers’ off-season moves haven’t impressed odds markers just yet, obviously.

What are your thoughts about these odds? Did any teams get snubbed? Which ones are overrated? Let us know how you feel in the comments.

Duchene trade talks quiet, but Avs will ‘listen to offers’

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To little surprise, not much is going on in the trade market. Just ask Colorado Avalanche GM Joe Sakic.

The Denver Post’s Mike Chambers did just that, and Sakic revealed that he would still consider trading the likes of Matt Duchene … although he didn’t mention him by name.

“I will be listening to offers. Right now it’s quiet on all fronts,” Sakic said. “But I’ll listen to offers on how we can get better. I’ll never name names but I’ll sit there and if something makes sense for the way we want to go, with our team, we’ll really look at that.”

Considering that it’s mid-August, it’s not too surprising that little is happening. One can imagine that several GMs are more interested in finding drinks with umbrellas in them than trying to land Duchene, at least since the Avalanche don’t seem interested in giving him up without some serious haggling.

(And, really, the Avs would be wise to pump up Duchene and Gabriel Landeskog‘s respective trade values, anyway.)

That Denver Post story features a semi-update on Nikita Zadorov. Sakic told Chambers that the two sides agreed that a two-year deal would be best, but the “numbers” aren’t there yet. He didn’t tip his hand about how big the gap was. For what it’s worth, Sakic didn’t sound too worried about the lure of the 2018 Winter Olympics swaying Zadorov to head overseas.

While a lot of the activity circles around what hasn’t happened, the Avalanche did realize that Will Butcher officially won’t sign with them, while Colorado added a college free agent (and former Maple Leafs prospect) Dominic Toninato to their own mix.

At the moment, it doesn’t seem like something big is brewing regarding Duchene and other prominent Avs, but at least Sakic isn’t slamming the door shut on such a possibility.

Logan Couture’s teeth are still sore from horrifying mouth injury

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Still jarring and gross: the image of Logan Couture‘s mouth after taking a puck to the mouth about five months ago.

Still sore: Couture’s mouth.

Yep, the San Jose Sharks star hasn’t totally gotten over that injury, which forced him to have false teeth up top and some painfully sore ones on his bottom row. NBC Sports California’s Kevin Kurz transcribed the unfortunate details Couture shared with NHL Network this week:

“There’s good days and bad days,” Couture said. “My bottom teeth are still my real teeth. They’ve tried to keep them so I don’t lose them. I don’t know if I’ll be able to, they’re still pretty sore. My top teeth are all fake now – my front six, I think. So, it’s different. It just feels different in my mouth.

“But everything else with my face and all that is healed. I’m lucky that it’s an injury that didn’t affect my training, and hopefully won’t affect me going forward.”

As someone who’s endured more than a few unpleasant trips to the dentist, stories like these always lead to queasiness. This classic PHT post about Keith Tkachuk’s agony always comes to mind in situations like these.

Speaking of queasy, this is footage of when things were really bad for Couture. That link is provided because some will inevitably want to look, but treat this like the other gross things on the Internet that you wish you never saw and just move on.

(Seriously, the healing process continues on this end.)

Anyway, about the only bit of good news is that Couture can still train more or less as usual. He endured that injury late in the regular season (March 25), and while he suited up for the Sharks’ first-round series, it sure seemed like both Couture and Joe Thornton were limited in those six games against the Edmonton Oilers.

As much as dental agony seems like a uniquely “hockey” problem, this situation sounds especially rough for Couture.

Sidney Crosby at 30

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This post is part of Penguins Day on PHT…

Much like with Lebron James, Sidney Crosby is at the point in his career where the question is no longer “Will he be one of the all-time greats?” After back-to-back Stanley Cup and Conn Smythe wins, the discussion is shifting to where he ranks among the best of all-time.

And, like, with Lebron, there are a number of factors – including era, which is probably an even tougher nut to crack in hockey – that can twist and turn the debate.

Mere moments after Crosby and the Pittsburgh Penguins repeated as champs, Mike Sullivan made the case for number 87’s greatness.

” … You know, he’s arguably the best player of his generation, and he’s a guy that just knows how to win,” Sullivan said. “And so he’s done it in all different venues, whether it be the NHL and Stanley Cups to the World Cup to the Olympics. And he’s a player that — and I believe this, what separates him from others is his work ethic and his willingness to do what it takes to be the very best.”

It’s mind-blowing to consider the very real possibility that Crosby will be viewed as the best player to skate for the Penguins, edging Evgeni Malkin, Jaromir Jagr, and even Mario Lemieux.

It’s also mind-blowing that he just turned 30 on Aug. 7.

When it comes to the Mario vs. Sid debate that may eventually pick up steam, Crosby has some advantages. He matched “The Magnificent One” by getting those back-to-back titles and playoff MVP nods, while he already has three Stanley Cup rings to Lemieux’s two (and four Stanley Cup Final appearances to two).

Crosby already has an iconic moment to his name. Along with Paul Henderson’s goal and “Gretzky to Lemieux,” Crosby’s golden goal in the 2010 Winter Olympics will endear him to Canadian hockey fans for ages.

This list of accolades is honestly dizzying:

But, again, things get tougher when you try to really drill down to Crosby vs. The Greats. Most obviously since he’s far from done right now.

Circling back to the debate that might divide Penguins fans in particular, Crosby might also edge Lemieux if you correct for our modern era, which is so tough on scoring. NHL.com’s Rob Vollman explains Crosby’s place among the most impressive runs before 30:

From this perspective, Crosby is no longer in a block of a dozen players but in more select company. He ranks third at age 30 with an era-adjusted 998 points (377 goals, 622 assists), well ahead of Lemieux, who is in fourth with 899 points (365 goals, 534 assists). Gretzky is in first with 1,479 points (495 goals, 984 assists) in 896 games, followed by Jagr with 1,018 points (414 goals, 604 assists) in 858 games. (Adding to the distinction of being in the top four with Gretzky, Jagr and Lemieux: Those are the only three players to win the Art Ross Trophy as the League’s top scorer in the 21 seasons from 1980-81 to 2000-01.)  

Interesting. (This quick document has a bit more to chew on.)

Vollman also makes the point that even the all-timers tend to stop locking down the biggest awards once they turn 30. There’s an obvious barrier in Connor McDavid (just check the Hart Trophy odds) and possibly some other bright young players, so for all we know, most of our peak memories of Crosby may already be in the past.

That said, much like Lemieux, injuries have limited some of the stats Crosby’s been able to put up.

Crosby’s concussion history could conceivably prompt him to retire agonizingly early, but what if he instead gets better luck? We’ve seen cases, such as Patrice Bergeron, in which such issues become less of a concern over time. For all we know, Crosby might defy expectations and actually play until he’s 40.

(Hey, he already emulates Jaromir Jagr in being an inanely good puck protector.)

It’s been a special run already for Crosby, who’s already a no-brainer for the Hall of Fame. At this point, it’s about padding that resume.

Though, to Crosby’s credit, it’s still probably all about winning.

Sabres sign Zemgus Girgensons: two years, $3.2M

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The Buffalo Sabres basically wrapped up their mandatory summer moves by signing RFA Zemgus Girgensons to a two-year, $3.2 million contract on Thursday.

That translates to a cap hit of $1.6M per year; the team confirmed those terms.

The 23-year-old was selected 14th overall in the 2012 NHL Draft by the Sabres. He went two picks after the Sabres selected Mikhail Grigorenko, whose claim to fame is being part of the package that helped them nab Ryan O'Reilly. (Feel free to cringe at who went next, though hindsight seems especially convenient considering how long it takes to get to some of the whoppers.)

In Girgensons’ case, it’s still been a work in progress. His best years actually came early, particularly a sophomore season where he posted career-highs in goals (15) and points (30) despite being limited to 61 games. He enjoyed significantly higher ice time (19:05 per game) during that 2014-15, then came right back down.

If nothing else, Girgensons already has ample NHL experience, as he’s already played in 277 regular-season games.

Buffalo has about $7 million in cap space left, according to Cap Friendly, so there’s theoretically room to make more moves. Girgensons was their last remaining loose end of note, however.