Mike Modano retires after 21 seasons, announces decision via Facebook


Some might argue that he made the decision a year late – especially Dallas Stars fans – but Mike Modano announced his retirement from the NHL via his Facebook account today. He’ll hold a press conference to make it official on Friday.

Now that Modano chose to hang up his skates after a lengthy and prolific career, the debates about his legacy will begin. With seven All-Star nods and one Stanley Cup on his resume, he has the hardware to back up his impressive stats for a Hall of Fame bid.

An All-American career

The more lively debates will revolve around where he ranks among the best American born players in NHL history. As far as sheer quantity, Modano is unmatched (although Chris Chelios has the most games played, with 1,651). Modano tops all U.S.-born NHL players in points (1,374), goals (561), playoff points (145) and all forwards in games played (1,499).

Much like Steve Yzerman, Modano drew praise for becoming more defensively responsible in order to help the Stars win that Stanley Cup in 1999. He also compiled those staggering stats without many seasons alongside a high octane winger, which shows off just how special he was.

A tough end for Modano

On the other hand, the “quantity over quality” argument could hurt him against other American-born players who might have shined brighter for shorter periods of time. Aside from an impressive first season after the lockout (77 points in 2005-06), Modano’s production dropped off significantly beginning in the 2003-04 season. Last season was probably the worst campaign of Modano’s incredible career, as he managed just 15 points in an injury-marred 40 regular season games with the Detroit Red Wings, who often made him a healthy scratch during the playoffs.

It wasn’t a great ending for Modano, who opted against his storybook conclusion with the Stars to end the 2009-10 season. That shouldn’t take away from his outstanding career, which helped build the Dallas Stars into a successful team – and some might say a rebuttal to the claims that the NHL cannot work in “non-traditional” markets. Here’s Modano’s announcement via his Facebook page.

After a long summer of thinking about my future, I’ve come to the decision that it’s time to retire as a player from the NHL. There’s way too many people to thank here at this time and too much to say, so I have a press conference scheduled for early Friday afternoon. Check back Friday late afternoon for more. What a great ride it’s been!

What’s next for Modano?

Again, you can gripe all you want about his timing, but Modano should finish his playing days with the clarity that he maximized his potential. Now he can move on to whatever the next stage of his life will be – Modano discussed working in the front office for the Stars or doing some studio work – with his wife Willa Ford by his side. His future is enviable whichever way you slice it.

Some people are just gifted, but it’s nice (and rare) to see them make the most of their talents. Modano certainly fits into that category, regardless of where you rank him among the all-time best Americans.

Sens demote former first-rounder Puempel

Matt Puempel
Leave a comment

Looks like Matt Puempel won’t be making the leap after all.

Puempel, the subject of Ottawa’s “looking to make the leap” profile during our Team of the Day series, has been sent down to AHL Binghamton one day prior to the Sens’ opener against Buffalo.

Puempel, taken by Ottawa in the first round (24th overall) at the ’11 draft, made his big-league debut last season and looked as though he’d stick around — only to suffer a high ankle sprain after 13 games, and miss the rest of the season.

The 22-year-old came into this year’s camp looking to secure a full-time position at the big league level, but was beaten out by Shane Prince for the final forward spot on the roster.

To be fair, contract status probably played a role. Prince would’ve had to clear waivers to get down to Bingo, whereas Puempel didn’t.

A former 30-goal scorer in the American League, Puempel is expected to get another look with Ottawa this season.

Report: Torres won’t appeal 41-game suspension


Sounds like Raffi Torres is accepting his punishment.

Per Sportsnet, Torres won’t appeal his 41-game suspension for an illegal hit to the head of Anaheim’s Jakob Silfverberg.

The report comes just days after the NHL’s Department of Player Safety levied one of the longest disciplinary rulings in league history, citing both the severity of the Silfverberg hit and Torres’ lengthy history of suspensions, fines and warnings.

There was some thought, however, that Torres would try to challenge the ruling.


He does have a history of success in that department. In 2012,Torres successfully appealed his suspension for a headshot on Chicago’s Marian Hossa, and had his punishment reduced from 25 games to 21.

Torres also isn’t considered a “repeat offender” under the current collective bargaining agreement, as his last suspension came in 2013.

Of course, part of that clean record is due to the fact he hasn’t played much. Torres has largely been sidelined by injury for the last two seasons, missing all of last year with knee problems.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman delved further into the repeat offender thing in his latest 30 Thoughts column:

If you read the relevant sections of the CBA, the league takes the position that the repeat offender status is only applicable to fines. Repeaters are fined on a per-game basis, non-repeaters on a per-day basis. (The former is more expensive, because there are fewer games than days in an NHL season.) However, if you go to Section 18.2, among the factors taken into account are, “the status of the offender and, specifically, whether the Player has a history of being subject to Supplementary Discipline for On-Ice Conduct.”

So, in the NHL’s view, a player’s history is relevant, even if longer than 18 months ago.

Should the report prove accurate and Torres doesn’t appeal, he will be eligible to return to action on Jan. 14, when the Sharks take on the Oilers.