Todd Bertuzzi prepares to form next ‘two kids and a goat’ line in Detroit

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About a decade ago, Pavel Datsyuk, Boyd Devereaux/Henrik Zetterberg and Brett Hull formed the “two kids and a goat” line for the Detroit Red Wings. Around that time, Todd Bertuzzi was coming into his own as a premier power forward with the Vancouver Canucks.

A lot has changed since then. Bertuzzi earned some fantastic honors (two All-Star appearances, love from fantasy hockey owners for his tendency to score goals and take penalties) before things fell apart after that ugly incident with Steve Moore in 2004. Meanwhile, on the Red Wings’ side, Hull eventually retired, Devereaux faded from the picture and you probably are well aware of how things turned out for Datsyuk and Zetterberg. (If you need clarification: things turned out extremely well for those two “kids.”)

All these years later, Bertuzzi’s found a mild dose of redemption as a decent top-six forward in Detroit, but it looks like he’ll play more of a third line role in 2011-12. Apparently that means he’ll tag along with two rambunctious youngsters in Darren Helm and Justin Abdelkader (both 24). To Helene St. James, that means that Bertuzzi-Helm-Abdelkader might just represent the next version of the “two kids and a goat” line.

“It’s a little bit different, but at the same time, you’ve got to have some respect for Helmer and Abby,” Bertuzzi said. “They’re two tremendous players, young kids trying to establish themselves in the league and all that. They offer a lot. They’ve got a lot of speed and they work hard, so it’s just going to be something that if that’s where I’m slotted in, I just have to adjust my game and find a way to complement them.”

Bertuzzi and Helm sit next to each other at Joe Louis Arena and get along very well. Helm had just the right amount of glint in his eyes when he was asked about his new right winger, replying, “I hope I can match his speed and intensity. I wasn’t on the ice when he scored today, so maybe that’s what needs to happen. No, hopefully we can find a way to click. I think we can be a good line. Bert and Abby have more offensive upside than I do, but I think we can be a line that can shut teams down and also contribute.”

(I guess this means that we’ll probably need to wait at least another season for a spiritual sequel to “The Grind Line,” at least if this trio sticks.)

Without seeing that interesting mix in action, the idea might have some legs. Bertuzzi is nowhere near the physical force he once was – possibly because he wants to avoid being cast as a villain again – but he still boasts impressive size. That being said, the best asset he’ll bring to a mostly-grinding line is his soft hands. Helm is particularly well known for possessing blazing speed yet suffering from a general inability to finish the great chances his legs create, so maybe having Bertuzzi around could fill in the blanks.

On the flip side, Bertuzzi is also known for taking his fair share of bad penalties. There could be some concern that his mental lapses might drag down his younger, defensive-minded partners.

Of course, the Red Wings have a few weeks to iron out the wrinkles or throw out that idea altogether. Don’t be surprised if this odd mix ends up being a subtle success during a pivotal season in Detroit, though.

Report: Bruins avoid arbitration with Ryan Spooner

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Heading into today’s arbitration hearing, Ryan Spooner was reportedly looking for a $3.85 million dollar deal. On the other side of this equation, the Bruins were only willing to offer $2 million.

With that kind of gap, it seemed almost certain that this dispute would be settled by an arbitrator, but the two sides have reportedly met somewhere in the middle, per Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman.

Friedman is reporting that the two sides have avoided arbitration by agreeing to a deal worth $2.825 million.

Spooner finished last season with 11 goals and 39 points in 78 games. The 25-year-old scored two less goals and 10 less points in 2016-17 than he did the previous year.

There’s no doubt that he has plenty of offensively ability, but consistency in his own end has always been an issue (just ask former head coach Claude Julien).

If Spooner can put it all together this season, he’ll be able to earn a much bigger pay day next summer.

Brian MacLellan wants you to know that the Caps are still ‘a good team’

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The Washington Capitals will look pretty different when training camp opens.

Alex Ovechkin, Niklas Backstrom, T.J. Oshie, Braden Holtby and Evgeny Kuznetsov will all be back, but players like Justin Williams, Marcus Johansson, Kevin Shattenkirk, Nate Schmidt and Karl Alzner are starting new journeys somewhere else.

Some have suggested that the big number of departures will bring the Caps down a notch or two when it comes to regular season dominance. GM Brian MacLellan simply doesn’t see that happening.

“People make it sound like we’re a lottery team,” said MacLellan, per the Washington Post. “I’m shocked by that. We’ve got good players. I want people to know: We’ve got a good team.”

The Caps will have to rely on young veterans and/or rookies to fill the void left by all of those departures. Andrei Burakovsky and Tom Wilson may have to play bigger roles, while rookies like defensemen Lucas Johansen  and Christian Djoos may crack the lineup sooner than expected.

As of right now, the Caps have five defensemen on one-way contracts (Matt Niskanen, Brooks Orpik, Dmitry Orlov, John Carlson and Taylor Chorney), so there’s plenty of room for those youngsters to leave their mark on the team.

“It’s a good team, I think,” MacLellan said. “We have good goaltending. We have skilled players. We’re going to have to see how Djoos plays, how Johansen plays. We might take a little while to get up to speed in that area. I guess there’s a little uncertainty. But I feel good.”

 McLellan’s team might take a bit of a dip because the supporting cast took a hit this offseason, but expecting them to fall off the map because of it is a little premature.

PHT Morning Skate: Terrell Owens owns Kris Letang during training session

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–Minnesota Wild head coach Bruce Boudreau is now the owner of a junior hockey team. “This may sound corny, but I feel I was put on this Earth to promote hockey. So the idea of being involved in a junior team that is the middle void between high school hockey and college was very exciting to me.” (Minneapolis StarTribune)

–The Chicago Blackhawks traded Niklas Hjalmarsson to the Arizona Coyotes this offseason. The ‘Hawks were the only team Hjalmarsson has ever played for, and changing teams has been emotional for him. He showed exactly how difficult it is for him to play in a different city in a heartfelt Instagram post. (CSN Chicago)

Phil Kessel conducted a “I Will & I Won’t” interview. Will he bring the Stanley Cup to Toronto for the second offseason in a row? Uhhhh not exactly. Also, he’ll be rooting for one of Mayweather or McGregor, but he just doesn’t know who yet. (BarDown)

–Despite the fact that the Rangers and Mika Zibanejad agreed to a long-term contract on Tuesday, The Score believes the Senators still won the trade that saw them ship Zibanejad to New York for Derick Brassard. (The Score)

–The Hockey News continues their “2020 Vision” series on each NHL team. Their most recent piece focuses on the Chicago Blackhawks and what the team will look like in three years. Jonathan Toews and Duncan Keith will likely still be around, but youngsters like Nick Schmaltz and Alex Debrincat will take on bigger roles. (The Hockey News)

–Penguins defenseman Kris Letang was working out with former NFL wide receiver Terrell Owens in Montreal. For a guy in his 40s, Owens can still move pretty well:

EA Sports rolls out NHL 18 closed beta, with a lot of 3-on-3 focus

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EA Sports released a closed beta for “NHL 18” today, which gives players on Xbox One and Playstation 4 the chance to test three modes out from July 25 – Aug. 1.*

It sure seems like the beta – if not the full game – will focus on 3-on-3 overtime, and extending that experience beyond the confines of normal NHL action.

For one thing, the established EA Sports Hockey League mode will apparently include 3-on-3 overtime in the beta, and maybe more interestingly, also through full games. EA Sports explains as much:

Bringing authentic NHL 3-on-3 overtime to EA SPORTS Hockey League, you can now choose to play 3-on-3 full matches, opening up more ice for you and your teammates to get creative, pull off big plays, and showcase brand new skill moves. With more space to attack – and to make mistakes – 3-on-3 EASHL is higher stakes with more competition and skills.

Fans of the ailing sub-genre of arcade-style sports video games should take note that “NHL 18” introduces “NHL Threes.” The format hearkens back to the 16-bit days by turning off offside and icing calls, while a penalty will give a player a chance at penalty shot. Interesting. EA provided a little more information about the mode here, and it sure sounds like it could be fully featured upon release. The beta at least provides a taste of that.

(It wouldn’t be surprising if “NHL Threes” apes the previous generations “3 on 3 NHL Arcade,” which became something of a cult classic for some hockey game fans.)

Along with EA Sports Hockey League (note: a mode where you control a single player rather than a full team) and “NHL Threes,” the beta also includes the more vanilla Online Versus Play mode.

While the beta appears to be closed, EA’s NHL account is tweeting out ways to get codes on Tuesday, so it might not be too late if you’re lucky.

Without taking the beta for a test run personally just yet, this sounds like a nice opportunity for people to give the near-complete “NHL 18” a trial before the full game comes out on Sept. 15.

* – Or, as Kotaku’s Jason Schreier recently noted, maybe for a longer period of time.