Marc Staal, Eric Staal

Eric Staal feels horrible about brother Marc’s struggle with concussion recovery


When Rangers defenseman Marc Staal went down last year with what was initially deemed to be just a knee injury, it was his brother Eric Staal from the Carolina Hurricanes that put him out of action. As it turns out, an injured knee wasn’t the only problem for Marc as he also suffered a concussion in the hit.

Fast forward to this season’s training camp and Marc is still having issues with post-concussion symptoms and the Rangers are proceeding very carefully with him so he doesn’t see his condition worsen. Staal is being kept out of physical practice situations as well as the team’s first three preseason games before heading to Europe to start the season. Staal’s symptoms are affecting him enough so that the coaches sent him home on Monday after not even skating with the team.

Eric Staal is feeling awful about what his brother is going through in trying to prepare for the season. Chip Alexander of the Raleigh News & Observer gets the word from the Hurricanes captain about how he hopes his brother can get well soon.

“There were times he was making progress and doing well, then had some setbacks,” Eric Staal said. “He took some time off, then tried to amp it up again and it was difficult for him. He dealt with it most of the summer.

“I think right now they’re just being real cautious with where he’s at and make sure he’s 100 percent healthy. Hopefully he can keep progressing in the right direction and he can get back going, because he’s one of their best players and he wants to be out there with their team.

“It (stinks). It’s not fun for him or fun for me.”

The story about how the Staal brothers have been close their entire life and how three out of four of the brothers are in the NHL is one we’re all familiar with. Seeing a situation like this that develops because of how hard they play, even against each others, is sad to see come up. Getting to see both Marc and Eric at the All-Star Game in Raleigh last season made for a real treat, especially playing together on the same team.

Seeing the brothers deal with an issue like this that links them together, however, is one that’s rough to see play out. Both players are important to their teams and Marc’s All-Star season last year was a sign to the rest of the league that he had arrived as a force in New York. Marc’s recovery for the Rangers is vital to their success.

The Rangers’ depth on defense isn’t exactly stellar and having to get someone to fill the minutes that Marc plays is going to be rough. Staal’s skills and all-around game make him one of their best players. Thankfully, the Rangers are making the right moves now to make sure he’s fully healthy before getting him back into the mix heavily.

As for Eric, you have to hope his mind is in the right place out on the ice while his brother is recovering. Being responsible for injuring your own brother has to be tough to handle psychologically. The Hurricanes need their captain to be at the top of their game if they’re going to challenge for the playoffs. Even being off for a few games could make the difference between making the postseason and packing it in early.

Brandon Sutter didn’t have the greatest preseason

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When Brandon Sutter was acquired by the Vancouver Canucks, GM Jim Benning called the 26-year-old a “foundation piece for our group going forward.”

Sutter was quickly signed to a five-year extension worth almost $22 million, more evidence of how highly management thought of the player.

Fast forward to yesterday, when Benning was asked the following question:

“What does it say that you made the trade for Sutter, you called him a ‘foundation’ player, and it took him until the final night of the preseason to find a spot (with the Sedins) on the wing, which isn’t his natural position?”

Here was Benning’s response:

“Well, [head coach Willie Desjardins] wants to try that out, he thinks that’s going to be a good fit. At various times, the Sedins played with wingers with speed, with [Ryan Kesler], who could get in on the forecheck and had a good shot. Sutter brings some of those qualities, too.”

While all that may be true, Sutter was not signed to play the wing; he was brought in to play center, specifically on the second line. He finished the preseason with zero points in five games. And as mentioned, he’ll start the season on the wing, not his natural position.

Meanwhile, youngsters Bo Horvat, 20, and Jared McCann, 19, had outstanding camps and are expected to start the regular season (tonight in Calgary) centering the second and third lines, respectively.

Though Sutter did finish the preseason with 12 shots on goal, up there with the most on the Canucks, it’s fair to say he did not look like a “foundation” player.

“I haven’t seen him play his best,” Desjardins said last week. “I see a guy who’s big and a good skater and who understands the game real well, but just hasn’t got that involved.”

Now, we are only talking about the preseason here. New players often take time to get comfortable. Perhaps playing with the Sedins can provide Sutter with some confidence.

“I know he’ll be there and I totally believe that,” said Desjardins.

But it hasn’t been the best start, and if it wasn’t for the encouraging play of the youngsters, it would be a far bigger story in Vancouver.

Related: Canucks roll the dice on rookies, waive Vey and Corrado

Detroit waives Cleary

Daniel Cleary

Dan Cleary‘s time as a Red Wing could soon be over.

Detroit placed the veteran forward on waivers Wednesday afternoon, per TSN. The move comes after Cleary signed a one-year, one-way deal worth $950,000 just weeks before training camp, then proceeded to play in four of Detroit’s exhibition contests, scoring two points.

It’ll be interesting to see what happens now.

At 36, Cleary doesn’t have much left in the tank and is coming off a year in which he played just 17 games. But as we noted back in the summer, this seems to all be part of a larger plan.

From the Free Press:

A situation that bears the handprint of former coach Mike Babcock has put the Wings in the position of being honor-bound to keep Cleary, 36, aboard, even as he is coming off a season that saw him play just 17 games, producing two points.

This debacle began two years ago. The Wings had offered Cleary a three-year, $6.25-million contract before he became unrestricted July 1. He declined. The Wings then signed Stephen Weiss and Daniel Alfredsson, leaving little space under the salary cap. Then Cleary didn’t sign with anyone. September rolled around. The Flyers offered Cleary a three-year deal for $8.25 million, but Cleary then decided he wanted to stay in Detroit.

He ended up flying to Traverse City, where the Wings already had begun training camp. He met in a hangar with Holland and Babcock. Holland pointed to a near maxed-out budget. Babcock pushed hard for Cleary to be signed. What resulted was a one-year, $1.75-million deal with the understanding the Wings would take into consideration what Cleary left on the Flyers table.

After playing out that $1.75 million deal, Cleary re-signed in Detroit last summer to a one-year, $1.5 million pact — so, essentially, the Wings are now in final year of an unspoken three-year agreement that’s (sorta) aimed at repaying what got left on the table in Philly.

Got all that?

If Cleary gets through waivers, the Wings could send him to AHL Grand Rapids. Since he signed a one-way deal, he’d get his money regardless.

There’s also the option of Babcock and the Leafs claiming Cleary off waivers — a scenario that, as unlikely as it sounds, has already made the rounds on social media.