Coyotes do not expect Turris to be signed by the start of training camp

With all of the good vibes swirling around the NHL with restricted free agents coming to terms with their respective teams, it seems like most of the news regarding contract negotiations has been positive lately. Brad Marchand in Boston? Signed. Zach Bogosian in Winnipeg? Signed. Even John Tavaras, who isn’t an RFA until next year, has reportedly signed a contract extension. Dare we say the future is bright on Long Island?

Unfortunately for the Phoenix Coyotes, it’s not sunshine and rainbows for every restricted free agent this week.

Meet Kyle Turris. The Coyotes have been negotiating with New Westminster, BC native for the entire summer—yet some contracts take longer than others. It was reported last week that Turris’ camp is looking for a contract in the 3-year, $4 million per season range. Yes, really. Obviously, that’s not the going rate for a 22-year-old prospect that has only scored 19 goals in 131 career games. It doesn’t matter how much potential the former 3rd overall pick, those aren’t the numbers of a $4 million man.

Coyotes GM Don Maloney spoke with Pro Hockey Talk Wednesday evening to update the Kyle Turris talks. The news isn’t promising for Coyotes fans that are eager to see #91 on the ice in Glendale.

“No [there are no updates], Maloney revealed. “But there is no movement and we are not expecting him to be at camp when we open up on Friday.”

In an climate where most teams and players are working under the deadline of training camp to get a deal done, the Coyotes and Turris are almost resigned to the fact that this is going to drag on past September 16. Good thing they were able to trade for Daymond Langkow, right?

Once again, we see an organization balancing potential vs. production with a restricted free agent. Sure, he has shown the potential to be a productive scorer with a healthy dose of flash throughout his 131 games in the NHL. Then again, he’s also shown most of the flash at the AHL level in San Antonio. It’s unfathomable that inconsistency and potential would translate to a hefty payday.

Lets break it down: there’s no way that a player who has scored 25 points in the NHL over the last two hockey seasons can justify a 3-year deal that even approaches James van Riemsdyk’s $4.25 million cap hit. That should seem simple enough. If Turris had a breakout performance in the playoffs against Detroit last season, then he may be able to argue that his career and turned a corner.

A goal and two assists in four games is nice—but hardly qualifies as a “breakout performance.”

Like so many other restricted free agents, he’s a classic example of a player that would be ideally suited for a “second contract.” If the two sides could agree on a shorter term contract, it would buy time for both sides to evaluate the situation before they returned to the bargaining table. It would also provide an opportunity for Turris to fulfill his vast potential over the next few years before he asked for a raise. Until he proves his worth on the ice, it’s understandable why the Coyotes would be hesitant to sign him to any substantial contract.

For now, the waiting game continues.

Craig Anderson took his blunder hard – probably too hard – in Sens loss

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Members of the Ottawa Senators were quick to come to Craig Anderson‘s blunder (see above) in Tuesday’s 3-2 shootout loss to the Philadelphia Flyers, and it’s easy to see why.

It’s not just about his personal struggles, either. When Anderson’s managed to play, he’s been flat-out phenomenal, generating a .927 save percentage that ranks near a Vezina-type level (if he managed to play more than 35 games).

Goaltending has been a huge reason why Ottawa has at least a shot of winning the Atlantic or at least grabbing a round of home-ice advantage, so unlike certain instances where teams shield a goalie’s failures, the defenses are absolutely justified.

Anderson, on the other hand, was very hard on himself.

You have to admire Anderson for taking the blame, even if in very much “hockey player” fashion, he’s not exactly demanding the same sort of credit for his great work this season.

Just about every relevant team in the East playoff races won tonight

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After Eastern Conference teams deserved a “C” on Monday, they generally passed Tuesday’s tests with flying colors. Sometimes they carved out three-point games when relevant teams faced off, too.

It’s almost bewildering trying to figure out where to start … so how about the top of the East?

Metro’s rich get richer

The Minnesota Wild deserve credit for fighting back from a considerable deficit, including overcoming an Alex Ovechkin hat trick (all on the power play). Ultimately, T.J. Oshie‘s overtime-winner gave Washington the 5-4 (OT) win.

Elsewhere in the Metro’s top ranks, Sergei Bobrovsky grabbed his 41st win of the season (3-1 win against the Sabres) to put Columbus three points behind the Capitals and two ahead of the idle Penguins.

Metro top three (all with 75 games played)

1. Capitals – 108 points
2. Blue Jackets – 105 points
3. Penguins – 103 points

Canadiens gain ground

The Montreal Canadiens handled the Dallas Stars 4-1 in The Epic Battle of the Benns. Meanwhile, the Philadelphia Flyers beat the second-place Senators 3-2 via a shootout

Both the Maple Leafs and Bruins won their games, leaving Toronto one point ahead of Boston for third in the Atlantic.

Atlantic top five

1. Canadiens – 95 points in 76 games played
2. Senators – 91 points in 75 GP
3. Maple Leafs – 87 points in 75 GP

Bruins – 86 points in 76 GP
Lightning – 83 points in 75 GP

Finally, let’s look at the final spot in the East

OK, so there’s some overlap here. Why don’t we check on the most wild-card-relevant teams?

Third Atlantic spot: Leafs – 87 points in 75 GP

Final spot: Bruins – 86 points in 76 GP

Lightning – 83 points in 75 GP
Islanders – 82 points in 75 GP
Hurricanes – 82 points in 75 GP
Flyers – 80 points in 76 GP
Panthers – 77 points in 76 GP

Again, the Bruins won, as did the Flyers. The Lightning were idle. The Panthers fell to the Maple Leafs. Buffalo lost while Detroit and New Jersey are out of the running.

You know who deserves special mention outside of the top eight? The Carolina Hurricanes deserve such a distinction, as they are enjoying one of their hottest runs in franchise history after beating Detroit 4-1.

The overall message: just about any truly relevant team at least grabbed a standings point, with most winning games outright on Tuesday.

It doesn’t exactly thin the herd, but it keeps the door open for a fun race to the finish.

It’s official: Red Wings’ playoff streak ends at 25 seasons

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When we look back at the 2016-17 season for the Detroit Red Wings, it will be remembered for some said endings.

It began without Pavel Datsyuk. We knew that their last game at Joe Louis Arena this season would be their last ever. And now we know that Joe Louis Arena won’t be home to another playoff run.

After 25 straight seasons of making the playoffs – quite often managing deep runs – the Red Wings were officially eliminated on Tuesday night. In getting this far, they enjoyed one of the greatest runs of longevity in NHL history:

Tonight revolves largely around East teams winning and teams clinching bids – the Edmonton Oilers could very well end the league’s longest playoff drought this evening – but this story is more solemn.

EA Sports tweeted out a great infographic:

“Right now it’s hard to talk about it, because you’re a big reason why it’s not continuing,” Henrik Zetterberg said in an NHL.com report absolutely worth your time.

Mike “Doc” Emrick narrated a great look back at Joe Louis Arena here:

Here’s what deal between women’s team, USA hockey is reportedly worth

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It’s great news that the U.S. women’s national team and USA Hockey came together on a deal for the upcoming world championships.

Still, all we really know is that the contract lasts four years, as the two sides decided to keep the dollar figures between each other.

The Hockey News’ Ken Campbell laid out a lot of the possible numbers on his Twitter feed, giving us an idea of what reportedly sealed the deal.

First things first, Campbell reports that the deal is worth $3.7-$4 million overall.

That’s quite the impressive number on face value, but what does it mean for players over a four-year contract?

Campbell reports that earnings will range between $850K and $950K, depending upon how they perform in the tournament:

They’ll also receive the same travel and other miscellaneous amenities as the men’s team, but what about years that are more about training than competition?

Interesting stuff. Definitely check out Campbell’s feed for additional details.