NCAA Men's Frozen Four - Michigan Wolverines v North Dakota Fighting Sioux

Brett Hextall: Like father, like son


Take a look at the name stitched across his back, and fans see a familiar name that makes them wonder about his bloodlines. Take a look at the competitive style on the ice and he removes all doubt. The NHL may want to brace itself. There’s another Hextall coming down the road—and he’s just like all of the Hextalls that came before him.

Phoenix Coyotes prospect Brett Hextall signed a pro contract this April and will be wreaking havoc all over the Coyotes training camp this week. He spent two seasons with Junior A Penticton before moving on to the University of North Dakota.

“Yeah, [the chippiness] probably my strongest point—at least when I’m playing my most effective,” Hextall explained. “I’m really getting under people’s skin just because I’m a pest. Like a Max Talbot, Matt Cooke, or someone like that. If I can be a relentless guy, [play] in-your-face, winning pucks, and just getting under people’s skin because I’m always around, always there, and always getting a piece of them. That’s definitely when I’m at my best.”

That’s right. A Hextall just said that he’s at his best when he’s playing like Matt Cooke. Not surprisingly, it’s something he’s learned from his family. He’s known from the start what it would take to be a good hockey player.

“I got that ‘mentality’ from my Grandpa and my Dad and hearing their stories,” the 5’10” forward shared. “You play the game hard with everything you’ve got. That’s the only way I’ve ever known. I’m definitely not going to ‘wow’ anyone with my skill, but if I can play a really hard, up-and-down game, that’s when I’m at my best.”

He’s right—when he’s playing with an edge, he’s an unmistakable force on the ice. But he’s selling himself short when he says he won’t “wow” anyone out on the ice. He’s an incredibly fast skater with above average hands that are good for more than just fighting. He racked up 72 points in his final season with Penticton in “one of the best years of his life,” and then managed double-digit goals in each of his three seasons with the University of North Dakota.

Some people might be surprised that the younger Hextall didn’t follow his father’s lead into the net. But what younger fans may not realize, is that Ron isn’t the only former NHLer with the Hextall surname. In fact, Brett is looking to become the second-ever 4th generation NHL player. His great-grandfather Bryan had a Hall of Fame career for the New York Rangers. His grandfather (Bryan, Jr.) and great-uncle (Dennis) also had long careers in the NHL. All of the family made it to the NHL as skaters; it wasn’t until Ron played goal that the family made a name with a netminder. Brett told that he tried on the mask and pads when he was younger—but it wasn’t for him.

“My Dad just told me, ‘Just keep playing forward, learn how to skate, and then we’ll go from there.’ I eventually never really feel in love with [goaltending]. I like being a forward, it never stuck.”

Finding a position isn’t the only advice Ron dispensed to his son, as he tried to find his career path. Ron, the current assistant GM of the Los Angeles Kings, encouraged Brett to go the college route to serve as a back-up plan if his hockey career didn’t pan out.

The youngest Hextall says going to college was always his plan. “I definitely wanted to play college growing up. My Dad played major junior and he told me, if he didn’t play in the NHL, he’s not sure where his life would have led. He definitely encouraged me to take the college route and it’s worked out pretty well.

Like so many other hockey players, there was a bit of luck that was involved when the Coyotes selected him with their 6th round pick in the 2008 Entry Draft. Assistant GM Brad Treliving revealed that the organization was in Penticton to scout a better known prospect (Zac Dalpe).

“It’s funny, when we drafted him… I remember coming out of that game and saying, ‘who’s this kid?’ He was causing a riot it seemed every shift. So we took him with the thought that he’s a competitive kid, obviously he had great bloodlines.”

Needless to say, those within the Coyotes management are intrigued with the type of player they’ve landed.

“I think his game translates to a 3rd line kind of guy,” explained Treliving. “But he can play with good players. One thing about Brett is that he has ‘hockey intelligence.’ I watched him a lot at North Dakota and he plays with a lot of energy and he can get in and forecheck; but he puts the puck in the right spot, he supports the puck well. He knows how to play the game—he’s a smart player. All of those things [type of role] will weed themselves out in training camp, but I think he’s a guy who can play in a checking, energy type role. But I wouldn’t discount him and say he not a guy who can play with good players.”

But as people keep picking apart his game and analyzing his potential, Treliving was able to pay him the biggest compliment without even trying. “He’s definitely a Hextall,” Treliving said with a laugh.

Does that mean we can expect him to attack future Hall of Famers in the future? “I might have to!” the younger Hextall said with a grin. “I have to get a few YouTube videos just to match-up [with my Dad].”

Yeah, it’s doubtful the rest of the league will be a laughing when he’s showing the rest of the league exactly what “being a Hextall” means.

Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards

The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Not before Kings GM Dean Lombardi shares his sometimes startling perspective, though.

Lombardi has a tendency to be candid, especially in the press release-heavy world of sports management. Even by his standards, his account of Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.”
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the way the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?

Coyotes exploit another lousy outing from Quick

Jonathan Quick

Despite owning two Stanley Cup rings, there are a healthy number of people who aren’t wild about Jonathan Quick.

Those people might feel validated through the Los Angeles Kings’ first two games, as he followed a rough loss to the San Jose Sharks with a true stinker against the Arizona Coyotes on Friday.

Sometimes a goalie has a bad night stats-wise, yet his team is as much to blame as anything else. You can probably pin this one on Quick, who allowed four goals on just 14 shots through the first two periods.

Things died down in the final frame, but let’s face it; slowing things down is absolutely the Coyotes’ design with a 4-1 lead (which ultimately resulted in a 4-1 win).


A soft 1-0 goal turned out to be a sign of things to come:

Many expected the Kings to roar into this second game after laying an egg in their opener. Instead, the Coyotes exploited Quick’s struggles for a confidence-booster, which included key prospect Max Domi scoring a goal and an assist.

It’s worth mentioning that Mike Smith looked downright fantastic at times, only drawing more attention to Quick’s struggles.


After a troubled summer and a failed 2014-15 season, Los Angeles was likely eager to start things off the right way.

Instead, they instead will likely focus on the fact that they merely dropped two (ugly) games.