Suggestions for six NHL teams who haven’t named a captain yet


However you might feel about the actual impact of a captain, a team can reveal it’s direction by who it names. Two teams recently announced their likeable decisions to name heart-and-soul forwards as their new captains. The St. Louis Blues gave the job to rugged winger David Backes while the Rangers made Ryan Callahan their new leader.

While those two teams filled those vacancies, there are still six NHL clubs without captains. Here are PHT’s polite suggestions for which direction those teams should go in.

Buffalo Sabres

Former captain: Craig Rivet

The Sabres are set to embark on the first full season of the Terry Pegula era, but the captaincy remains a bit of mystery. Jochen Hecht is a balanced veteran, but he might be on his way out soon. New acquisitions such as Ville Leino and Christian Ehrhoff don’t really seem like the captain types. Tyler Myers might be a bit young for that role while the team should avoid giving the “C” to their goalie Ryan Miller after Vancouver’s failed experiment with Roberto Luongo.

If I were Lindy Ruff, we’d name top center Derek Roy the captain. Perhaps Buffalo would be best served waiting a while, though, especially if hard-hitting blueliner Robyn Regehr shows some of those leadership qualities.

Colorado Avalanche

Former captain: Adam Foote

The Avalanche are a team in transition, with the 2011-12 season being a pivotal campaign. Milan Hejduk is a long-time veteran, but it seems like the clock is ticking on his impressive NHL career. Matt Duchene is an All-Star player with a great attitude, but might need a little more time to mature into the job. Erik Johnson could be a good choice if he justifies the Avs’ risky move to get him.

When you consider his contract situation (only Jan Hejda’s deal runs longer and only Semyon Varlamov matches his three remaining years), overall talent level and experience with the team, Paul Stastny might be the best option as their next captain. Besides, if it doesn’t work out, they can just trade him like the rumor mongers say.

source: APFlorida Panthers

Former captain: Bryan McCabe

The Panthers are a wildly different team than the one that last played in April, with a slew of new young players and even two veterans added in Brian Campbell and Ed Jovanovski. If you ask us, their options should come down to a player who’s been there through thin and really thin: Stephen Weiss. The underrated center remains their best all-around player and should serve as the backbone of this team alongside David Booth.

New Jersey Devils

Former captain: Jamie Langenbrunner

The Devils’ only have one reason not to make Zach Parise their new captain: his unclear contract situation. New Jersey should just suck it up, though, because he’s a shining example of what the team wants from their players. Honestly, handing him the “C” might help convince him that he should be a part of the team’s future … even though a similar tactic didn’t work out when Atlanta tried that method with Parise’s teammate Ilya Kovalchuk.

New York Islanders

Former captain: Doug Weight

The Islanders have some great options for their next captain (check out a lengthier discussion of the topic here). While veteran defenseman Mark Streit and rugged winger Kyle Okposo have strong chances, we’d go with John Tavares. Tavares is the obvious face of the franchise for the present and probably long-term future.

Philadelphia Flyers

Former captain: Mike Richards

Sure, he’s battling injuries and hasn’t always been the most popular guy in the world, but the Flyers should give Chris Pronger the “C.” He carries an air of authority regardless of what letter is on his shoulder and still has the makings of being an impact player in the NHL. Besides, many felt like he was their “real” captain during the last couple seasons, anyway.


Those are PHT’s picks for should-be captains, but do you think teams should consider different options? Let us know in the comments.

Braun out with upper-body injury; Zubrus to make Sharks debut

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The San Jose Sharks will be missing a top-4 defenseman tonight when they host the defending champs from Chicago.

Justin Braun has an upper-body injury. His status is considered day-to-day.

“Brauny has been one of our unsung heroes here through the first quarter of the season,” coach Peter DeBoer told CSN Bay Area. “He’s played some outstanding hockey. So, we’re going to miss him, but it’s a great opportunity for Mueller and Tennyson and one of these guys to establish themselves. It’s a great opportunity for us to reward Dillon for how well he’s played.”

Against the Blackhawks, Brenden Dillon will take Braun’s spot on the top pairing alongside Marc-Edouard Vlasic; Paul Martin and Brent Burns will stay together on the second pairing; and 20-year-old Mirco Mueller will skate with Matt Tennyson.

Mueller has played just four games for the Sharks this season. In his last game, Thursday in Philadelphia, he received only 9:13 of ice time.

Also tonight, new Shark forward Dainius Zubrus is expected to debut on the fourth line.

Related: Sharks sign Zubrus, because DeBoer

Johansen calls trade rumblings ‘weird,’ says relationship with Torts is ‘great’

Ryan Johansen
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One day after reports surfaced of Ryan Johansen being at the center of trade talks, all parties involved from Columbus did what they’re supposed to do — downplay the situation.

You can read the denials in full over at the Dispatch, but here’s the gist:

— Johansen said the rumors were “weird” and that he’s “never seen it before.” He also said there were no issues between him and head coach John Tortorella, calling the relationship “great.”

— GM Jarmo Kekalainen wouldn’t address the report, nor would Johansen’s agent, Kurt Overhardt.

— Johansen added he hasn’t spoken to any of Columbus’ management about the trade rumblings.

So there’s that. What’s next?

At this stage of the game, it’s hard not to think about another Overhardt client, Kyle Turris.

Turris, you’ll recall, spent four (mostly) stormy years with the Coyotes before his trade out to Ottawa was orchestrated. Turris eventually told GM Don Maloney “this is not going to work out” with the club, and he was gone.

So, consider the similarities now:

— Turris was 22 at the time of the trade, with four years and 137 games under his belt.

— Johansen is 23, with five years and 291 games.

— Both had contentious contract holdouts with their respective clubs.

— Both are Overhardt guys.

— The Turris trade happened after the Coyotes went from Wayne Gretzky to Dave Tippett as head coach.

— Johansen is already on his third head coach (Scott Arniel, Todd Richards, Tortorella).

For now, these are all coincidences (or a forced narrative, depending what you think of the author).

And, of course, the one big — big — difference between the two is that, at the time of his trade, Turris wasn’t as good or established a player as Johansen currently is. Therefore, logic suggests any Johansen trade would be a lot more blockbuster-y and, therefore, probably more complex.

And as we know, complex deals aren’t easy to pull off.

Flyers’ Gagner to miss another week after Malone hit

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The nasty blow Sam Gagner took in Monday’s game against Carolina will keep him on the shelf for a little bit.

On Wednesday, Flyers GM Ron Hextall said the club expected Gagner to be out around a week with injuries suffered on the hit, delivered by ‘Canes forward Brad Malone (per the Inquirer).

Gagner suffered a fairly significant facial laceration, which forced him from the game entirely. He didn’t practice on Tuesday and, in a corresponding move, the Flyers called up Colin McDonald from the AHL to fill Gagner’s spot on the roster.

This is the second facial injury Gagner’s suffered in recent years. He’d previously had his jaw broken by an errant Zack Kassian high stick, while he was with the Oilers and Kassian the Canucks.

Prior to getting hurt, Gagner had two goals and five points in 18 games, averaging just under 12 minutes per night.

‘It’s absolutely not true’ — Lemieux denies report of ‘big falling out’ with Crosby

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ - OCTOBER 5:  Sidney Crosby #87 and Mario Lemieux #66 of the Pittsburgh Penguins share a few words during a break in action against the New Jersey Devils in their NHL opening night game at the Continental Airlines Arena on October 5, 2005 in East Rutherford, New Jersey.  The Devils won 5-1. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

Well, that didn’t take long.

Just hours after Matthew Barnaby went on the radio and said he’d heard that Sidney Crosby and Mario Lemieux had had a “big falling out,” Lemieux came out and denied it.

“It’s absolutely not true,” said Lemieux, per the club’s Twitter account. “It’s silly.”

Today marked the second time in less than two weeks that the Penguins have been forced do some damage control.

Last week, the Penguins insisted that they weren’t actually “mad at each other,” as Evgeni Malkin had put it after a bad loss to New Jersey.

“He did not mean we are mad at each other,” said Crosby. “He meant we are frustrated.”