UAH Chargers - logo

With the UAH hockey program threatened, their fans and students try to save it again

1 Comment

We’ve seen how playing hockey in the south can be a perilous life. The Atlanta Thrashers were sold off and moved to Winnipeg and even college hockey in the deep south is facing a dilemma of its own. The University of Alabama-Huntsville, who two years ago was denied entry into the CCHA conference and was left to play on its own as an independent team with no conference to call home, is in big trouble.

Interim school president Dr. Malcolm Portera is talking big about trying to save money for the school and the biggest way to do that in his mind is to demote the school’s lone Division I athletic program, the men’s hockey team, down to a club sport. The program is in need of money and a conference to call home. With the way the WCHA and CCHA are blowing up in favor of the Big Ten and the NCHC leaving many schools scrambling to put things back together, the door would appear to be open for UAH to find a home once again.

Even if UAH is able to raise the money to show they’re a viable program in the south and can stick around in Division I, Portera might still decide to cut the program. In a sport where there’s so much in flux between the conferences and with the threat of losing more programs when all the conference divorces are finalized in a couple years, having a program cut out for financial reasons would potentially work as the first domino to fall in college hockey.

The students and fans at UAH, however, are doing their part to try and fight the power. Geof Morris of SaveUAHHockey.com, a website formed two years ago when the CCHA denied UAH entrance to their conference, is on the case to get the word out. A rally will be held tomorrow to plead with the college administrators to save the program and keep top level college hockey alive in Alabama. Morris is also leading the way for a petition online to help those outside of Alabama to let their voices be heard.

Adding to the voices speaking up for hockey in Alabama, Mark McCarter of The Huntsville Times penned an open letter to Dr. Portera, in it he pleads his case to keep hockey alive in Alabama.

UAH hockey has been kept alive through private funding through the years, and there’s a groundswell of boosters ready with big-time commitments with a lot of zeroes at the end.

Listen to them. Work with them. Give them a price tag.

Give them a chance.

You may look at the bottom line on scholarship money being awarded to hockey players. Look beyond that. That investment is a wash. Those are partial scholarships. If you’re handing out $450,000 in aid, that much or more comes back to UAH as these guys pay out-of-state tuition and other fees to cover the remainder of their cost of attendance.

NCAA hockey is an exclusive club as it is with less than 60 schools participating at the Division I level. Losing a program, any program, hurts the sport on the whole. What started as an ominous possibility for UAH in 2009 when the CCHA denied them entry is coming to a head now with the interim school president talking about moving the program down in importance to a club level team, it’s starting to look like an eventuality.

If college hockey plans on having a larger presence on the college athletics scene and to be viewed as one of the bigger sports, losing programs is the wrong way to go about it. Getting UAH into a conference would be a hell of a bandage to help stop the bleeding in Alabama and while the WCHA is on the hunt to fill out ranks after all their big teams have moved on to greener pastures, they’ve got a great opportunity to help keep college hockey strong once again. Just like when they did the same for Bemidji State when the CHA dissolved two years ago, they can do it all over again by reaching out to a team in desperate need of a new home in UAH.

If that first step can happen, then perhaps the fans in Huntsville can keep their hockey dreams alive as well.

NHLPA hire Bruce Meyer brings a ‘wealth of knowledge,’ says Fehr

Donald Fehr
AP Photo
Leave a comment

Bruce Meyer’s résumé of victories as a lawyer is a long and impressive one, and he has now joined the NHL Players’ Association as a senior director of collective bargaining, policy and legal, the union announced Thursday.

During his tenure of more than 25 years at the law firm Weil, Gotshal and Manges LLP, Meyer represented the NHLPA, NFLPA and NBPA.

The NHLPA said in a statement that in his new position, Meyer “will focus on a wide array of policy and legal issues.”

In working for those unions, he was involved in matters such as collective bargaining and arbitration, as per his online profile.

“Bruce will be a great addition to the NHLPA’s staff. He brings a wealth of knowledge to this new role coming from his law firm where he gained three decades’ worth of valuable experience, including effectively representing the NHLPA and other Players’ Associations as outside counsel,” said NHLPA executive director Don Fehr in a statement.

The NHLPA said Meyer will begin at his new position in mid-August.

The news of this hire comes more than a month after the league sued the NHLPA after Dennis Wideman‘s 20-game suspension for hitting linesman Don Henderson was reduced to 10 games by a neutral arbitrator.

Related: Report: NHL dismisses neutral arbitrator who reduced Wideman’s suspension

Sweet ride: Blackhawks sponsor CJ Wilson Racing’s Porsche Cayman at Road America

4_sign_off_blackhawks
CJ Wilson Racing
Leave a comment

Chicago Blackhawks fans, start your engines!

Yes, according to MotorSportsTalk, the Blackhawks have become the main sponsor of CJ Wilson Racing’s No. 35 car, a Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport, for the upcoming IMSA Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge event at Road America next month.

That’s a sweet ride.

From MotorSportsTalk:

The partnership will officially launch at the United Center on Wednesday, August 3, from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m in advance of Saturday’s race. Fans will have the opportunity to get up close to the car, meet the drivers and Blackhawks Ambassador Denis Savard, and have their picture taken.

The race takes place Aug. 6 at Road America in Wisconsin.

Third team’s the charm? Devils ink Gormley to one-year, two-way deal

<>during the first period at TD Garden on November 12, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts.
3 Comments

Since being selected by the Coyotes at 13th overall in the 2010 NHL Draft, Brandon Gormley has had a difficult time breaking into the league on a full-time basis.

On Thursday, the 24-year-old Gormley joined his third NHL team, signing with the New Jersey Devils on a one-year, two-way deal worth $650,000 at the NHL level, the club announced.

Despite his draft status, Gormley has yet to play a full season in the big league, although this deal could give him an opportunity to end that. For the Devils, the deal adds more depth to the blue line in the organization and for a friendly price.

Last season, Gormley split time between the Colorado Avalanche and its farm team, the San Antonio Rampage. Despite some high expectations about where he could fit on the Avs’ blue line, he was eventually put on waivers in January.

He ended the season with one assist in 26 games with the Avalanche, and hit the open market after Colorado didn’t give him a qualifying offer.

Wild sign Dumba to two-year, $5.1M deal

dumbaeye
Getty Images
1 Comment

After ongoing contract talks between the Minnesota Wild and restricted free agent defenseman Matt Dumba, the two sides have come to a deal.

The Wild announced Thursday that they had signed Dumba to a two-year deal, worth a total value of $5.1 million.

A breakdown of the new deal:

— In 2016-17: $2.35 million.

— In 2017-18: $2.75 million.

Selected seventh overall by the Wild in 2012, Dumba had his most productive campaign this past season, with 10 goals and 26 points in 81 games.

Known for his offensive skills — he had 20 goals and 57 points with Red Deer in the WHL in his draft year — Dumba also brings a coveted right-shot to the Wild blue line, which features four players with contracts of four or more years of term remaining.

As per General Fanager, the Wild still have $2.168 million in projected cap space, but they have secured all their remaining restricted free agents.