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With the UAH hockey program threatened, their fans and students try to save it again

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We’ve seen how playing hockey in the south can be a perilous life. The Atlanta Thrashers were sold off and moved to Winnipeg and even college hockey in the deep south is facing a dilemma of its own. The University of Alabama-Huntsville, who two years ago was denied entry into the CCHA conference and was left to play on its own as an independent team with no conference to call home, is in big trouble.

Interim school president Dr. Malcolm Portera is talking big about trying to save money for the school and the biggest way to do that in his mind is to demote the school’s lone Division I athletic program, the men’s hockey team, down to a club sport. The program is in need of money and a conference to call home. With the way the WCHA and CCHA are blowing up in favor of the Big Ten and the NCHC leaving many schools scrambling to put things back together, the door would appear to be open for UAH to find a home once again.

Even if UAH is able to raise the money to show they’re a viable program in the south and can stick around in Division I, Portera might still decide to cut the program. In a sport where there’s so much in flux between the conferences and with the threat of losing more programs when all the conference divorces are finalized in a couple years, having a program cut out for financial reasons would potentially work as the first domino to fall in college hockey.

The students and fans at UAH, however, are doing their part to try and fight the power. Geof Morris of SaveUAHHockey.com, a website formed two years ago when the CCHA denied UAH entrance to their conference, is on the case to get the word out. A rally will be held tomorrow to plead with the college administrators to save the program and keep top level college hockey alive in Alabama. Morris is also leading the way for a petition online to help those outside of Alabama to let their voices be heard.

Adding to the voices speaking up for hockey in Alabama, Mark McCarter of The Huntsville Times penned an open letter to Dr. Portera, in it he pleads his case to keep hockey alive in Alabama.

UAH hockey has been kept alive through private funding through the years, and there’s a groundswell of boosters ready with big-time commitments with a lot of zeroes at the end.

Listen to them. Work with them. Give them a price tag.

Give them a chance.

You may look at the bottom line on scholarship money being awarded to hockey players. Look beyond that. That investment is a wash. Those are partial scholarships. If you’re handing out $450,000 in aid, that much or more comes back to UAH as these guys pay out-of-state tuition and other fees to cover the remainder of their cost of attendance.

NCAA hockey is an exclusive club as it is with less than 60 schools participating at the Division I level. Losing a program, any program, hurts the sport on the whole. What started as an ominous possibility for UAH in 2009 when the CCHA denied them entry is coming to a head now with the interim school president talking about moving the program down in importance to a club level team, it’s starting to look like an eventuality.

If college hockey plans on having a larger presence on the college athletics scene and to be viewed as one of the bigger sports, losing programs is the wrong way to go about it. Getting UAH into a conference would be a hell of a bandage to help stop the bleeding in Alabama and while the WCHA is on the hunt to fill out ranks after all their big teams have moved on to greener pastures, they’ve got a great opportunity to help keep college hockey strong once again. Just like when they did the same for Bemidji State when the CHA dissolved two years ago, they can do it all over again by reaching out to a team in desperate need of a new home in UAH.

If that first step can happen, then perhaps the fans in Huntsville can keep their hockey dreams alive as well.

Video: Penguins coach takes issue with late, high Orpik hit on Maatta

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The Pittsburgh Penguins have spoken out against a late, high hit that Washington Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik threw on Olli Maatta early in the first period of an eventful Game 2 on Saturday.

Maatta left and didn’t return. He played only 31 seconds, and the Penguins were reduced to five defensemen for a large portion of the game. Orpik was given a minor penalty on the play, but the league’s Department of Player Safety may see it differently.

The hit occurred well after Maatta had gotten rid of the puck. He struggled on his way to the dressing room for further evaluation.

Based on multiple reports, Orpik wasn’t made available to the media following the game, which went to the Penguins as they earned the split on the road.

But the Penguins have taken issue with the hit.

“I thought it was a late hit,” said Penguins coach Mike Sullivan, as per CSN Mid-Atlantic. “I thought it was a target to his head. I think it’s the type of hit everyone in hockey is trying to remove from the game.”

Game on: Penguins even series with rival Capitals

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The Pittsburgh Penguins will head back home with a split of their second-round series with the rival Washington Capitals.

Former Capitals forward Eric Fehr came back to burn his hold team, as he scored with under five minutes remaining in regulation to help lift the Penguins over Washington with a 2-1 victory in an eventful Game 2 on Saturday. Evgeni Malkin threw the puck toward the net and Fehr was able to re-direct it by Braden Holtby.

Oh, this was an eventful game, indeed.

It started early in the first period with Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik catching Penguins blue liner Olli Maatta with a late and high hit that warranted — at least for now — only a minor penalty for interference. Maatta, clearly in distress following the hit, didn’t play another shift and saw only 31 seconds of ice time in total, as Pittsburgh was reduced to five defensemen for the remainder of the game.

It continued in the third period. Kris Letang was furious after getting called for a trip on Justin Williams, and even more ticked off when the Capitals tied the game on the ensuing power play.

For two periods, the Capitals couldn’t get much going. Only four of their players had registered a shot on goal through 40 minutes, while the Penguins held the edge in that department and held the lead.

Washington came out with more jump in the third period, testing rookie netminder Matt Murray with 14 shots in the final 20 minutes. But the Penguins got the late goal to break the deadlock.

Video: Penguins’ Letang was furious after Capitals tie up Game 2 with power play goal

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Kris Letang watched from the penalty box as the Washington Capitals tied up Game 2 with a power play goal in the third period. The Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman was called for tripping after he appeared to muscle Justin Williams off the puck as he entered the zone.

Letang let his disagreement with the call be known at the time, and was furious after the Capitals capitalized on a goal from Marcus Johansson.

The Capitals started the period down a goal and being outshot 28-10 by the Penguins, who need a win to even the series.

Also, it seems this is worth mentioning:

Video: Hagelin goes top shelf to give Penguins the lead in Game 2

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In their quest to even the series, the Pittsburgh Penguins had done a nice job through two periods of suffocating the Washington Capitals, while gaining the lead on a beautiful goal.

Carl Hagelin took advantage of a vast amount of space that opened up in front of the Washington net, finishing off a nice pass from Nick Bonino, burying his shot just under the cross bar on the glove side of Braden Holtby.

Through two periods, the Penguins were outshooting Washington 28-10. Only four Capitals players — Alex Ovechkin, T.J. Oshie, Evgeny Kuznetsov and Matt Niskanen — had registered shots on goal.