Let the nitpicking begin: The first batch of NHL 12 player ratings are out

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Searching for (and then critiquing) the latest player ratings is a time-honored tradition for hockey fans ever since real-life hockey stars first appeared in video games. Normally, that’s something that you would do shortly after opening up the game, but thanks to Operation Sports, you won’t have to wait until the September 13 release date to gripe about Sidney Crosby being the highest rated skater at 94.

The sports gaming Web site revealed NHL 12’s ratings for skaters as well as the full team and legends ratings today. You can pour over every minute (if outdated) detail on those rosters at your leisure, but I thought I’d point out the each teams’ top three skaters – as in forwards and defensemen, not goalies – that were revealed in that post.

Before getting into the list of 30 teams’ highest rated skaters and legends, here are a few reactions.

  • Aside from the Blues, Panthers and Coyotes, just about every team has a borderline “star” (87 rating or above) player. That doesn’t always seem fair, but it could make the game more fun since the playing field might be a bit more even.
  • Still, I must admit I let out an audible “Wow” when I saw Dustin Byfuglien’s rating. Some might feel the same way about Phil Kessel, Erik Johnson, Jeff Carter and so on.
  • How can a legend be rated an 85?
  • Look, I know Marian Gaborik is ultra-talented and that games aren’t required to factor injuries as much as maybe they should but … is he really better than Brad Richards?

OK, now that I have my own knee-jerk reactions out of the way, let’s get cracking.

A couple notes first: These rosters are obviously a bit outdated (example: Alex Frolov is on the Rangers’ roster instead of in the KHL), so it’s quite possible that EA will release an immediate roster update that might change this quite a bit. That being said, player ratings often remain static through frequent updates, only to see drastic changes in certain situations.

There are a few teams with an extra player rating mentioned for your own aggravation/amusement. Legends ratings are listed at the end of this post. Finally, there are some ties for third place, so consult this link for a deeper look at those rosters.

Anaheim

Ryan Getzlaf – 91
Corey Perry – 90
Bobby Ryan – 89

Boston

Zdeno Chara – 91
David Krejci – 87
Milan Lucic – 87

Buffalo

Derek Roy – 88
Thomas vanek – 88
Jason Pominville – 87

(Ville Leino – 82)

Calgary

Jarome Iginla – 90
Alex Tanguay – 85
Jay Bouwmeester  84

Carolina

Eric Staal – 90
Joni Pitkanen – 84
Tomas Kaberle – 84

(Jeff Skinner – 83)

Chicago

Jonathan Toews – 91
Marian Hossa – 89
Patrick Kane – 89

(Duncan Keith – 89)

Colorado

Paul Stastny – 87
Erik Johnson – 87
Matt Duchene – 84

Columbus

Rick Nash – 89
Jeff Carter – 87
Kristian Huselius – 84

Dallas

Loui Eriksson – 87
Brenden Morrow – 87
Alex Goligoski – 85

Detroit

Pavel Datsyuk – 93
Henrik Zetterberg – 91
Nicklas Lidstrom – 88

Edmonton

Ales Hemsky – 87
Ryan Whitney – 85
Shawn Horcoff – 84

Florida

Stephen Weiss – 85
Brian Campbell – 84
David Booth – 84

Los Angeles

Anze Kopitar – 88
Drew Doughty – 88
Mike Richards – 87

Minnesota

Mikko Koivu – 88
Dany Heatley – 88
Devin Setoguchi – 84

Montreal

Michael Cammalleri – 87
Andrei Markov – 87
Tomas Plekanec – 87

Nashville

Shea Weber – 89
Ryan Suter – 87
Sergei Kostitsyn – 83

New Jersey

Ilya Kovalchuk – 91
Zach Parise – 91
Travis Zajac – 85

NY Islanders

Mark Streit – 87
John Tavares – 87
Michael Grabner – 83

NY Rangers

Marian Gaborik – 89
Brad Richards – 88
Marc staal – 85

Ottawa

Jason Spezza – 88
Sergei Gonchar – 85
Daniel Alfredsson – 84

Philadelphia

Chris Pronger – 90
Danny Briere – 87
Claude Giroux – 87

(Jaromir Jagr – 83)

Phoenix

Shane Doan – 85
Keith Yandle – 84
Rostislav Klesla – 83

Pittsburgh

Sidney Crosby – 94
Evgeni Malkin – 91
Kris Letang – 85

San Jose

Joe Thornton – 91
Patrick Marleau – 88
Dan Boyle – 87

St. Louis

David Backes – 85
Barrett Jackman – 84
Andy McDonald – 84

Tampa Bay

Steven Stamkos – 91
Martin St. Louis – 89
Vincent Lecavalier – 88

Toronto

Phil Kessel – 87
Dion Phaneuf – 85
Luke Schenn – 84

Vancouver

Sedin twins – 91
Ryan Kesler – 88

Washington

Alex Ovechkin – 93
Nicklas Backstrom – 87
Alex Semin – 87

(Mike Green – 87)

Winnipeg

Dustin Byfuglien – 87
Andrew Ladd – 85
Nik Antropov – 85

Legends

Mario Lemieux – 97
Wayne Gretzky – 97
Steve Yzerman – 92
Ray Bourque – 91
Gordie Howe – 91
Chris Chelios – 89
Jeremy Roenick – 88
Borje Salming – 85

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If you ask me, EA made the smart move by giving Lemieux and Gretzky the same rating. Anyway, how do you feel about these initial ratings? Feel free to share your reactions in the comments.

(H/T to On the Forecheck.)

Penguins will be without Evgeni Malkin in Game 6; Patric Hornqvist returns

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The Pittsburgh Penguins have another opportunity to try and win their first-round series against the Philadelphia Flyers on Sunday afternoon. If they do it they are going to have to do so without one of their top players, Evgeni Malkin.

Malkin did not take the pre-game warmups and will not be in the lineup after suffering an injury in their Game 5 loss on Friday night.

Here is a a look at the play where he became tangled up with Flyers forward Jori Lehtera in the first period.

Malkin left the game for the remainder of the period only to return for the second. He played the remainder of the game but did not get his regular workload and seemed to be struggling. After the game Penguins coach Mike Sullivan would only say that Malkin was fine.

Obviously he is not fine or he would be in the lineup on Sunday.

Malkin has three goals and two assists in five games this postseason.

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

Riley Sheahan took pre-game line rushes between Phil Kessel and Carl Hagelin in place of Malkin, allowing the Penguins to keep the Derick Brassard, Bryan Rust, Conor Sheary line together as it has played very well in this series.

While the Malkin injury is bad news for the Penguins they will be getting winger Patric Hornqvist back in the lineup after he missed the past two games due to an upper body injury.

Hornqvist is a difference-maker on the Penguins’ power play, a unit that struggled mightily in their Game 5 loss on Friday night, going 0-for-5 while also giving up a shorthanded goal. He will skate on the top line alongside Sidney Crosby and Jake Guentzel.

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Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Barzal, Boeser, Keller are 2018 Calder Trophy finalists

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Mathew Barzal of the New York Islanders, Brock Boeser of the Vancouver Canucks, and Clayton Keller of the Arizona Coyotes have been named as the three finalists for the 2018 Calder Trophy. The award is voted on by the Professional Hockey Writers Association and given “to the player selected as the most proficient in his first year of competition in the National Hockey League.”

This year’s rookie class was dynamic and while Barzal, Boeser and Keller get to go to Las Vegas, you could easily make cases for Yanni Gourde (25 goals, 64 points), Kyle Connor (rookie best 31 goals) and Charlie McAvoy (32 points, 22:09 TOI), among others, to be included.

The winner will be announced during the NHL Awards show on June 20.

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

The Case for Mathew Barzal: The Islanders forward went the first five games of the season without a point, but once he got going, he was an offensive force. Barzal led all rookies with 85 points and 27 power play points, and finished sixth in goals with 22. He was also the only rookie to average over a point per game (1.04). One of the highlights of Barzal’s rookie resume is that he recorded three 5-point games, making him the second rookie in league history to achieve the feat. The last to do it? Joe Malone in the NHL’s first season of 1917-18.

The Case for Brock Boeser: Injury cut short Boeser’s season, allowing him only to play 62 games, but it was still an impressive rookie campaign for the owner of the one of the league’s top flows. Boeser finished second in goals with 29 and fifth in points with 55. He led all rookies in power play goals (10) and was tied for second in power play points (23). In January, Boeser joined Mario Lemieux as the only rookies to take home MVP honors at the NHL All-Star Game one night after taking home the Accuracy Shooting title during the NHL Skills Competition in Tampa.

The Case for Clayton Keller: The Coyotes forward finished tops in average ice time among rookie forwards (18:05) and shots (212), second in points (65) and assists (42), third in power play points (20) and fifth in goals (23). He also led Arizona in goals, assists and points and recorded a 10-game point streak, which tied him for the third-longest in franchise history.

2018 NHL Award finalists
King Clancy (Monday)
Bill Masterton Trophy
Lady Byng Trophy
Norris Trophy
Selke Trophy
Vezina Trophy

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

WATCH LIVE: Flyers, Avalanche attempt to force Game 7s

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Game 6: Pittsburgh Penguins at Philadelphia Flyers, 3 p.m. ET (Penguins lead 3-2)
NBC
Call: John Forslund, Eddie Olczyk, Pierre McGuire
Series preview
Stream here

Game 6: Nashville Predators at Colorado Avalanche, 7 p.m. ET (Predators lead 3-2)
NBCSN
Call: Kenny Albert, AJ Mleczko, Brian Boucher
Series preview
Stream here

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

Vegas Golden Knights provide a new template for expansion teams

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Dan Bouchard can appreciate, better than most, the Miracle in the Desert.

He was a goalie for the expansion Atlanta Flames back in the 1970s, so he knows how difficult it is to build a competitive team from scratch.

”It’s astonishing what they’ve done in Vegas,” said Bouchard, who still lives in the Atlanta area, when reached by phone this week. ”I think it’s the greatest thing to happen to hockey since the Miracle on Ice,” he added, referring to the seminal U.S. upset of the mighty Soviet Union at the 1980 Olympics. ”It’s that good.”

Indeed, Vegas has set a new norm for expansion teams in all sports. No longer will it be acceptable to enter a league with a squad full of dregs and take your lumps for a few years, all while fans willingly pay big-league prices to watch an inferior product.

The Golden Knights have come up with a stunning new template for how this expansion thing can be done.

They romped to the Pacific Division title with 51 wins. In the opening round of the playoffs, they finished off the Los Angeles Kings in four straight games , casting aside a franchise that has a pair of Stanley Cup titles this decade while becoming the first expansion team in NHL history to sweep a postseason series in its debut year.

Imagine how storied franchises in Montreal and Detroit and Edmonton must be feeling right about now.

They didn’t even make the playoffs.

From Bouchard’s perspective, it’s all good. Vegas’ success right out of the starting gate will make everyone raise their game in the years to come.

”This will wake up the teams that are sitting on $90 million budgets and not doing anything,” he said. ”People will say, ‘If Vegas can do it, we can do it.’ That’s a paradigm shift in the game.”

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

When one considers how NHL expansion teams have fared over the years, the Vegas story becomes even more compelling.

The Golden Knights are the first new team in the NHL’s modern era to have a winning record in their inaugural season, a period that began in 1967 and encompasses 26 new franchises (including one, the ill-fated California Seals, who are no longer around).

Only six other first-year teams have made the playoffs – and that includes four that were assured of postseason berths in the landmark 1967 expansion. You see, when the NHL finally broke out of its Original Six format, doubling in size to a dozen teams, it placed all the new franchises in the same division, with the top four getting postseason berths even with sub-.500 records.

Until the Golden Knights came along, the Florida Panthers were the gold standard for NHL expansion. They finished one game below .500 in their first season (1993-94) and missed the playoffs by a single point. In Year 3, they had their first winning record and made it all the way to the Stanley Cup final, though they were swept by the Colorado Avalanche.

That remains the closest the Panthers have come to winning a title.

In Sin City, the wait for a championship figures to be much shorter. Heck, the Golden Knights might do it this year.

They’re 12 wins away from hoisting the Stanley Cup in a city that has always had a soft spot for long shots.

”We’re still a few wins away from this being a great story,” said goalie Marc-Andre Fleury, a key contributor to the Golden Knights success.

Even now, it seems like a bit of dream to coach Gerard Gallant, who thankfully will be remembered for something other than getting left at the curb to hail his own cab after being fired by the Panthers.

”When this all started in October, we just wanted to compete,” Gallant said. ”Now we’re going to the second round of the playoffs. It’s unreal.”

For sure, the Golden Knights wound up with a much more talented roster than most expansion teams – partly through astute planning, partly through getting access to better players as a reward for doling out a staggering $500 million expansion fee, which was a more than six-fold increase over the $80 million required of Minnesota and Columbus to enter the league in 2000.

The expansion draft netted a top-line goalie in Fleury, who helped Pittsburgh win three Stanley Cups; center Jonathan Marchessault, a 30-goal scorer in Florida who was surprisingly left exposed by the Panthers; and winger James Neal, who had scored more than 20 goals in all nine of his NHL seasons. It also provided a solid group of defensemen: Colin Miller, Nate Schmidt, Deryk Engelland and Brayden McNabb.

In addition, the Golden Knights wisely nabbed young Swedish center William Karlsson, who hadn’t done much in Columbus but became Vegas’ leading scorer with 43 goals and 35 assists.

”They’ve got some top centers. They’ve got some real good defense. They’ve got good goaltending,” Bouchard observed. ”They went right down the middle. That’s how the built it. Then they complemented it with the fastest guys they could get their hands on. They went for speed.”

Previous expansion teams didn’t have it nearly as good.

Bouchard actually played on one of the better first-year teams when the Flames entered the league in 1972. They were in playoff contention much of the season and finished with more points than four other teams in the 16-team league, including the storied Toronto Maple Leafs.

But that was a team that had to struggle for every win. The Flames had only three 20-goal scorers and were largely carried by their two young goalies, Bouchard and Phil Myre.

”We didn’t have a bona fide 30-goal scorer,” Bouchard recalled. ”We had a lot of muckers.”

That was then.

The Golden Knights have shown how it should be done.

If expansion teams are going to fork over enormous fees for the chance to play, they should have access to a much better pool of potential players.

They should have a chance to win right away.

That way, everyone wins.

Paul Newberry is a sports columnist for The Associated Press.

AP Sports Writer Beth Harris in Los Angeles contributed to this column.

For more AP NHL coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/NHLhockey