Hockey world reacts to Wade Belak’s death

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In the wake of the NHL’s third horrific tragedy this offseason, the hockey world is starting to understand the weight of today’s events and come to terms with the heartbreak. Throughout the afternoon, both current and former players, announcers, agents, and journalists have all shared the sympathy and exchanged their thoughts on Wade Belak’s passing today. The common theme is that Belak was an unbelievably kind man who was quick to share a joke and bring laughter to people’s lives. Once again, the hockey world has lost one of its own way too soon.

Instead of sharing my individual thoughts, here’s a sample of the outpouring for the man who leaves behind a wife and two children. If you have any thoughts, please feel free to share them in the comments.

Edmonton Oilers defenseman Ryan Whitney:

“Such sad news about Wade Belak. Always heard great things about him. Thought go out to his family. RIP.”

Calgary Flames’ statement via James Mirtle (The Globe and Mail):

“We are deeply saddened with the news of Wade’s passing. We are proud that Wade wore the Calgary uniform and we will always remember him as member of the Flames Family. We would like to express our sincere sympathies to the Belak family. This is a terrible loss of a vibrant young man; a man with great character who truly loved the game of hockey.”

Eric Francis from the Calgary Sun and Hockey Night in Canada’s Hotstove

Wade Belak RIP. This one’s tough. As good a guy as you’d meet. He was great for the game and teammates. Sadness and shock hits hockey again.”

St. Louis Blues’ radio play-by-play man Chris Kerber:

“Boogard, Rypien, Belak – Their deaths may be purely coincidental & no similarities but at least a Q of are there similarities must be asked.”

Detroit Red Wings defenseman Mike Commodore:

“I remember skating with Wade 13 years ago at a summer camp when I was 18 and in college. He was a pro, he worked hard, he was funny and he was extremely nice to me and he didn’t have to be. I was just a college kid. I looked up to him ever since then. You’ll be missed Wade.”

Former NHL enforcer Chris Dingman speaking about his own experiences:

“Terrible news about belak. Had many battles with him in junior, tough guy on the ice, great guy off the ice. My heart goes out to his family. People think sports, and most just see a lifestyle. It is really hard mentally and physically. Especially hard when your done. When your done, your left to let ponder, what do I do with, myself now? Tough to ponder… More needs to be done to ease the transition.”

NHL agent Scott Norton:

“Boogard, Rypien and now Belak? Maybe we should spend less time worrying how they play on the ice, and more time helping em cope off?”

“Sports leagues r so proud about war on#steroids, when we gonna wake up + realize that booze, cocaine + pain killers r killing our athletes?”

Newly retired NHLer Dave Scatchard:

“This is the worst summer I’ve ever seen with regards to tragedies in the NHL. I pray this all ends here. #RIPwadebelak. #Iwillmissumyfriend”

Ex-teammate Jordin Tootoo:

“Very sad to loose a great teammate and a better person in Wade Belak. The Tootoo family send his family all our thoughts and prayers.”

Another ex-teammate in Steve Sullivan:

“RIP Wade. Great father, husband, teammate and friend. You leave us way too early. You will be missed. Strength to your family and friends!”

Adrian Dater from the Denver Post and Sports Illustrated:

“Wade Belak death will bring changes to NHL. Good guy, good family, but the life is brutal for a fighter and self esteem is low. I’ve seen it”

Predators beat-writer Joshua Cooper passed along some of GM David Poile’s thoughts:

“Poile: “Everybody knew when Wade Belak was in the room because he was big, he was loud and he was fun.”

But of all the people who have already shared their thoughts, perhaps Bruce Arthur of the National Post said it best:

“But if he was a tortured enforcer, he was also a great actor of the age. I never met a happier-seeming guy in hockey. He always seemed at ease; he was freshly retired, and in town to appear on the CBC’s reality show, where he surely would have been the star. Except he’s dead, and hockey feels sick again, right to its stomach.

Of all the guys who play that increasingly anachronistic role, Belak was the last guy you expected to die young. He apparently told a Calgary radio station last week that he was happy and healthy, and his head wasn’t ringing. When he talked about his retirement with the Post’s Sean Fitz-Gerald last week, he said, “I thought about having a press conference, but I didn’t want to make an ass of myself.”

It’s Philadelphia Flyers day at PHT

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The Philadelphia Flyers missed the playoffs last season, but the disappointment probably didn’t last too long after the events of the draft lottery a few weeks later.

The Flyers entered the lottery with a 2.2 per cent chance of landing the No. 1 overall pick. That selection eluded them, but they still moved up to the second overall pick in June’s Entry Draft. The Devils decided to take Nico Hischier first, leaving Philly to select fellow top prospect Nolan Patrick.

Philly has since signed Patrick to his entry-level contract. The biggest question for Patrick is his health, following a 2016-17 WHL season interrupted by injury. His aim was to resume skating in the middle of July.

Philly traded forward Nick Cousins to Arizona prior to the expansion draft. But the biggest shake-up this offseason in Philly was a draft-day trade that sent Brayden Schenn to St. Louis in exchange for Jori Lehtera, the 27th overall pick in this year’s draft and a conditional first-round pick in 2018.

Philly didn’t bring back goalie Steve Mason, who has signed with the Winnipeg Jets. The Flyers’ goaltending duo heading into next season has Michal Neuvirth alongside Brian Elliott, who left Calgary and signed for two years at $5.5 million in Philadelphia.

After three years with the Flyers, defenseman Michael Del Zotto has moved on to the Canucks, while Roman Lyubimov has returned to the KHL.

Today at PHT, we’ll discuss the key storylines facing the Flyers heading into next season.

Report: Red Wings RFA Athanasiou could sign in Russia

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With training camp approaching, Andreas Athanasiou is still without a contract for the upcoming season.

The 23-year-old forward and restricted free agent posted 18 goals and 29 points in 64 games for the Detroit Red Wings last season in the final year of his entry-level contract with an annual average value of $902,500.

Based on a report Tuesday afternoon, traveling overseas to play next season could be an option for Athanasiou, one of the bright young forwards in the Red Wings organization.

Earlier this month, Red Wings general manager Ken Holland said the organization has made a “number of offers” to Athanasiou.

One of the issues facing Detroit right now is the salary cap, which the Red Wings are currently over by almost $4 million, according to CapFriendly.

Report: ‘We … are not dealing with this issue as of now,’ says Iginla’s agent of Olympics

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National Hockey League players will not be going to the 2018 Olympics. However, it appears Team Canada has taken another step in expressing interest in a pair of unrestricted free agents — Shane Doan and Jarome Iginla.

That’s according to the Canadian Press on Tuesday, as it reported Team Canada general manager Sean Burke contacted representatives for both Doan and Iginla, inquiring about possible availability.

Both players are 40 years old and have represented Canada at previous Olympics when NHL players participated. Iginla set up Sidney Crosby‘s famous overtime winning goal during the 2010 Games in Vancouver.

From the Canadian Press:

Burke, who’s building the first Canadian Olympic roster without NHL players since 1994, suggested that both former Olympians would have to be playing somewhere if they were to be considered. He reached out to their representatives on Tuesday morning.

“We want to look at all possibilities, but there has to be a long-term plan because it’s going to very intense (at the Olympics) and it’s going to be great hockey and guys are going to have to have a plan for the year,” Burke said on a conference call, which also included the team’s head coach Willie Desjardins.

Whether or not the two veterans would be interested is another question.

“We really are not dealing with this issue as of now,” Don Meehan, Iginla’s agent, said in an email to The Canadian Press.

The report also indicated that Team Canada’s roster should become more clear by November.

Doan played his entire career with one franchise until this June, when Coyotes management informed the veteran forward that they would not be bringing him back for another season. He’s appeared in 1,540 NHL games throughout his career, but scored only six goals and 27 points in 74 games this past season.

Iginla, a two-time Olympic champion for Canada, split this season between Colorado and L.A. He had only eight goals and 18 points in 61 games with the Avalanche before getting dealt to the Kings. He then posted six goals and nine points in 19 games with L.A., although that club missed the playoffs.

Blue Jackets need Bobrovsky at his best to take the next step

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This post is part of Blue Jackets Day on PHT…

When it came time for the annual NHL Awards, Sergei Bobrovsky‘s rebound season was, deservedly so, recognized with a Vezina Trophy.

(He was also a finalist for the Hart Trophy but that went to phenom forward Connor McDavid.)

At the heart of the Columbus Blue Jackets’ franchise record-setting season, which saw them win 50 games and post 108 points while competing for the Metropolitan Division, was the performance of Bobrovsky. He was brilliant, particularly after his previous season didn’t go according to plan, in large part because of injuries.

He posted 41 wins over 63 starts, the most in a single season for him, and a .931 save percentage. That last stat technically isn’t an individual career best for Bobrovsky, although the one time he achieved a better save percentage was over 38 games during the lockout-shortened season.

Critical to his play was the fact he was able to remain healthy — a priority for Columbus heading into last season, and something that will need to continue once again in 2017-18. He was able to gain confidence in his own game and help propel his teammates to a different level, as the Blue Jackets competed with Pittsburgh and Washington through a good portion of the season for the division lead.

“When Bob’s at his game and feeling good, it brings a whole different kind of confidence into that room,” team captain Nick Foligno told the Associated Press last season.

Where Bobrovsky has struggled is in the playoffs. That continued again this past spring. In five games against a talented Penguins roster in the opening round, he allowed 20 goals against with an .882 save percentage, and is reportedly open to the idea of seeing a sports psychologist to help get over that hurdle.

With a good young roster, the Blue Jackets took quite a step forward last season. There was another productive year from Cam Atkinson. Zach Werenski impressed as a rookie defenseman. The biggest difference, however, was the goaltending Bobrovsky provided.

It’s difficult to believe April’s playoff struggles will have much, if any, impact on Bobrovsky heading into the new season. After all, he was able to prove in the weeks before that he can bounce back from disappointing times.

And he was able to prove that, when at his best, the Blue Jackets could be a dangerous team.