Jaromir Jagr and Jarome Iginla rank among players eyeing impressive milestones next season

It’s probably safe to say that every player in the NHL will go into the 2011-12 season with a list of goals. Some of the players will keep things a bit vague or just have an eye on the Stanley Cup while others might the be obsessive types to have an actual number of goals or points in mind.

John Kreiser of NHL.com details some of the biggest milestones that players can reach next season. Here are a few of the marks that stand out as especially interesting.

1,000 assists: Jaromir Jagr has a decent chance of becoming the 12th player in NHL history to get more than a thousand assists. He needs 47 to cross that mark, which isn’t too far-fetched; Jagr had 46 in his most recent campaign in 07-08.

500 goals: Jarome Iginla needs 16 goals to reach that rare milestone. It’s hard to imagine him falling short of that mark unless he gets injured. Daniel Alfreddson (389) and Marian Hossa (388) are on the verge of 400.

300 goalie wins: Evgeni Nabokov has 293 while Miikka Kiprusoff has 276, so both have a strong chance at reaching 300 W’s. Tomas Vokoun (262) and Jose Theodore (260) might have a shot if they have outstanding seasons, too.

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Naturally, Kreiser’s list made me wonder if there are some other interesting milestones/historically interesting stat scenarios for next season. Here are some more situations to watch, with help from hockey-reference’s milestones section.

source: Getty ImagesPoints

Vincent Lecavalier (793) is seven points away from the 800-point threshold while his teammate Martin St. Louis only needs 22 to join him there. Dany Heatley, Alex Tanguay, Chris Pronger, Steve Sullivan, Vinny Prospal and Scott Gomez are within striking distance of 700 points.

Jagr needs 42 points to pass Joe Sakic’s 1,641 points for eighth all-time in scoring. Mike Modano could climb quite a few all-time points ranks of his own if he opts to player another season:

15. Bryan Trottier – 1,425
16. Adam Oates – 1,420
17. Doug Gilmour – 1,414
18. Dale Hawerchuk – 1,409
19. Jari Kurri – 1,398
20. Luc Robitaille – 1,394
21. Brett Hull – 1,391
22. Modano – 1,374

It seems like a leap to imagine Modano scoring 52 points next season, but it’s at least in the realm of possibility if he plays again … right? If nothing else, 20th place seems perfectly possible.

source: Getty ImagesGoals

Teemu Selanne and Jagr might slightly affect the way people view their goal scoring genius this season (if Selanne plays, that is). Take a look at where they rank all time in goals scored.

10. Luc Robitaille – 668
11. Brendan Shanahan – 656
12. Jaromir Jagr – 646
13. Dave Andreychuk – 640
14. Teemu Selanne – 637

With that list in mid, Jagr should have three statistical objectives next season: 22 goals (to move to 10th-all time in goals), 46 assists (to reach 1,000 overall) and 42 points (to pass Sakic for eighth all-time). Another Selanne season would almost certainly allow him to move past Andreychuk and likely past Shanahan as well. An especially good one might even leave him in the top 10, depending on how Jagr fares.

Modano could move up the career list, too. He’s currently at 561, good for 23rd all-time. Four more goals would put him ahead of Mats Sundin and Joe Nieuwendyk while 13 more would place him 20th overall ahead of Mike Bossy.

source: APAssists

Joe Thornton is five assists away from 700 all-time.

As far as all-time numbers are concerned, Jagr (953 assists) needs four assists to pass Mark Recchi (13th place) and 14 to pass Doug Gilmour for 12th. He’d have to put together an awesome 64-assist season to pass 11th place Joe Sakic, who has 1,016 assists. Nicklas Lidstrom is 45 assists from the 900 mark and could move up the ranks quite a bit.

18. Trottier – 901
19. Phil Housley – 894
20. Hawerchuk – 891
21. Phil Esposito – 873
22. Denis Savard – 865
23. Lidstrom – 855

Goalie wins

Nikolai Khabibulin and Roberto Luongo can inch up the all-time wins list.

17. Gump Worsley – 335
18. Harry Lumley – 330
19. Sean Burke – 324
20. Khabibulin – 316
21. Luongo – 308

Roggie Vachon’s 16th-ranked 355 wins would probably be out of reach until next season, unless Khabibulin has an outstanding season.

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After looking at this list, here are a few stray thoughts.

  • One can only imagine where Jagr might rank in NHL history if he didn’t make an exodus for the KHL.
  • Modano probably should hang up his skates, but if he doesn’t he could move up history’s ranks.
  • Luongo is only 32 years old. If he stays reasonably healthy, he should be able to pass Chris Osgood’s 401 wins and be in the top 10 all-time in victories by the end of his career. It’s not even crazy to wonder if he could reach the 450-win mark and end up among in the top five.

Anyway, I hope you enjoyed this extended look at the milestones and potential historical impacts of the 2011-12 season. Are you getting excited for the return of hockey yet?

In a surprise, Blues name Steve Ott assistant coach

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Pretty wild last few days for St. Louis on the coaching front.

After gutting Mike Yeo’s staff of four assistants, then hiring hiring Darryl Sydor, the Blues went totally off the grid on Friday by announcing longtime NHLer Steve Ott would become Yeo’s new assistant.

“Steve was a competitor on the ice as a player and I expect him to bring that energy in this role,” Yeo said in a release. “He was highly respected as a player and a person among his teammates and I believe he will be a huge asset to our staff.”

The decision caught many off guard given Ott, 34, has no prior coaching experience and was playing as recently as last month, suiting up for Montreal in its opening-round playoff loss to the Rangers.

Ott is familiar with the Blues organization, having played there for three seasons.

“I am very proud of my playing career and will devote the same work ethic to my coaching career,” said Ott. “The Blues organization is very special to me and my family and I’m excited to take the next step in my hockey career with this franchise.”

Blues GM Doug Armstrong signed Ott to a three-year deal. It’s fitting that Armstrong was the one to engineer this move, as he’s been behind unorthodox coaching moves in the past. Last summer, he defied convention by hiring Yeo as Ken Hitchcock’s assistant, with the understanding that Yeo would inherit the head man position next season.

It didn’t go exactly to plan. Armstrong fired Hitchcock in February, accelerating Yeo’s ascension.

Kesler calls Game 6 loss to Nashville the ‘toughest’ of his career

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Ryan Kesler has lost some big games in his career.

He was on the United States team that lost to Canada in the gold-medal game of the 2010 Winter Olympics.

He was on the Vancouver Canucks team that lost to the Boston Bruins in Game 7 of the 2011 Stanley Cup Final.

But apparently neither of those losses were as bad as the one his Anaheim Ducks experienced on Monday.

“This was the toughest loss of my career,” Kesler said of losing Game 6 of the Western Conference Final to Nashville. “This stings. It still stings. We left everything out there.”

Kesler had a particularly tough game, finishing minus-4 in the 6-3 loss. In the series, he only had one assist, failing to score on any of his 19 shots.

At 32 years old, Kesler is running out of time to win his first Stanley Cup.

And perhaps that’s why this latest loss was especially tough for him. The Ducks had a great chance to eliminate the Predators once Ryan Johansen was lost for the series, and then they would’ve faced either Pittsburgh minus Kris Letang or the underdog Ottawa Senators.

That’s gonna sting every time.

Related: Johansen wishes he was there to shake Kesler’s hand after Predators won

Fisher returns to Preds practice, but still not cleared

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Given the injuries Nashville’s sustained at center this postseason, Mike Fisher‘s presence at today’s practice was a welcome sight — regardless of his availability for Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final.

“I feel pretty good,” Fisher told NHL.com after practicing for the first time since May 18. “I skated a few days here. Still not cleared, but it felt good to get out there with the guys.”

Fisher was knocked out of the Western Conference Final in Game 4, after taking a Josh Manson knee to the head. That, combined with the loss of Ryan Johansen to season-ending thigh surgery, whittled Nashville’s center depth down to Calle Jarnkrok, Colton Sissions, Vern Fiddler and Frederick Gaudreau.

Even though Fisher is pointless through 14 playoff games, his return would still be massive. In addition to serving as team captain, he was averaging just under 17 minutes per night prior to getting hurt, while winning 52 percent of his faceoffs.

He said his undisclosed injury feels “a lot better than it was a few days ago,” adding that his goal is to return for Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final on Monday.

Fisher took minimal contact at today’s skate, and worked on a line with James Neal and Harry Zolnierczyk.

Swedes have shown well in the Stanley Cup Playoffs

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) Filip Forsberg is having quite the spring for the Nashville Predators, setting franchise records with his eight goals and 15 points. He’s tied the team mark with at least a point in seven straight games.

Pontus Aberg scored the game-winning goal to put Nashville up 3-2 in the Western Conference finals, while defenseman Mattias Ekholm, has been smothering top lines all postseason. Viktor Arvidsson has 10 points, and his plus-13 rating ties him with Anaheim’s Rickard Rakell for second-best this postseason — behind Forsberg (plus-17).

All five of these players are Swedish. It has been a sweet postseason for players from a nation whose players once were derided for being soft and not able to handle the rigors of the NHL. In all, general manager David Poile has six Swedes on Nashville’s playoff roster as the Predators reached the Stanley Cup Final for the first time in their 19-year history.

“I must admit we haven’t gone out of the way necessarily to get them to this point, but I’m thinking maybe we should,” Poile said. “They’ve certainly been key parts of our team.”

The Predators have lots of company in mining Sweden for talent. Defenseman Erik Karlsson is one of four Swedes playing for Ottawa in the Eastern Conference finals, while former Nashville forward Patric Hornqvist is one of three for the Pittsburgh Penguins. A check of NHL rosters shows 79 skaters and 10 goalies from Sweden played during the regular season, with 40 appearing in at least one playoff game.

Anaheim coach Randy Carlyle said Sweden has become a hockey power for a small country. Teammates with Borje Salming and Inge Hammarstrom in 1976 in Toronto, Carlyle saw the abuse directed at both.

“That was a little bit more barbaric or archaic times of hockey,” Carlyle said. “But that’s how much the game has grown, and it has become a world-class game. And these players are world-class players and now you’re looking at their contribution and the numbers that are in the NHL, it’s all a tribute back to those two players.”

Because of the time zone difference, Rakell said, it was pretty tough to watch NHL games when he was growing up. The best chance to watch hockey stars came during national team tournaments in Europe. Rakell, now 24, started watching more of the NHL when he got to junior hockey, though he also had a favorite.

“I was growing up in the same hometown as Mats Sundin, and he was pretty big in that small town I grew up in,” Rakell said of the 13-year NHL center. “So he was one of the guys I was looking up to and watching highlight videos.”

Pittsburgh forward Carl Hagelin said Thursday that it’s a very good time to be a Swedish hockey player, noting Sweden beat Canada 2-1 in a shootout Monday for the world hockey championship . Each NHL team seems have two or three Swedes on the roster.

Yes, they do keep track of their countrymen during the regular season. In the playoffs, all friendships are put aside.

“In the playoffs, you just play to win games,” Hagelin said.

Hagelin estimated a third of Sweden watched the world championship. Thanks to the internet and social media, it’s much easier to watch the NHL these days.

“There’s a lot of people watching us back home,” Aberg said.

Penguins forward Oskar Sundqvist agreed: “I know a lot of my friends stay up basically the whole night and watch games. I think it’s growing every day in Sweden, and it’s just getting bigger and bigger.”

Swedish hockey has become so strong that Carlyle said NHL scouts are visiting the country regularly. Making the jump to playing in North America has its challenges for young players. Pittsburgh drafted Sundqvist in 2012 when he was 19, and he stayed in Sweden for two full seasons before making his NHL debut last season. He spent much of this season at the Penguins’ AHL affiliate in Wilkes-Barre/Scranton and now is 23.

“It’s not like you’ve got a one-hour car drive and get home with mom and dad,” Sundqvist said. “I have a lot to thank Pittsburgh for letting me stay in Sweden one more year and prepare to get ready for everything that is over here.”

A Swedish teammate means being able to relax and talk with each other in the same language. It’s also a little easier to get tips on what to do and not do to ensure a long stay in the NHL.

“Everybody wants to play here and everybody wants to make the best out of it if you ever get the chance,” Rakell said.