Mike Modano

Mike Modano continues to mull retirement options: ‘I’m still on the fence’


Few athletes had the send-off that Mike Modano enjoyed during his last game as a member of the Dallas Stars. It was a curtain call moment that seemed straight out of a Hollywood script that would probably be rejected for being too syrupy sweet.

Of course, reality rarely provides storybook endings. Modano decided to play at least one more season in 2010-11 and by almost all accounts, the results were disastrous. His impact in 40 regular season games with the Detroit Red Wings was marginal enough (15 points; 14:18 minutes per game) before an injury derailed his season. If that wasn’t enough, the future Hall of Famer dealt with the insult of being a healthy scratch during the playoffs after fighting through his injuries.

As bad as last season was – and as much as Modano’s skills have declined – the retirement decision ultimately comes down to Modano (assuming that he could generate an NHL offer, of course). Modano has been taking his sweet time when it comes to that decision, dropping a hint here and there but not giving a straight answer.

The latest update is more of the same, then. ESPN Dallas’ Richard Durrett caught up with the 41-year-old center, who admits that he’s still pondering his options, including the possibility of remaining in the public eye as a TV analyst or member of the Stars’ front office. Modano says he might make his decision by mid-September (which might allow him to sidestep training camp, by the way).

“It’s tough to think about letting go because it’s been a part of your life since you were a kid,” Modano said Friday. “You have to see how you feel and how much you want to do it. I’m still on the fence.”

Modano said he’s talked with several of the league’s television broadcast partners about the possibility of working on the air but isn’t sure what might be available. That includes Fox Sports Southwest, which broadcasts most of the Stars’ regular-season games.


Modano said he’d also be interested in working for the Stars organization once it has a new owner in place. Modano believes he could help with the club’s marketing.

“We need to get the fan base back up and excited again,” Modano said. “I’d be interested in working for them and doing that.”

Here’s hoping that Modano goes with one of those two options instead of trying to force another NHL season on his aging body. Modano’s played in 1,499 regular season games (1,374 points), 176 playoff contests (146 points) and won one Stanley Cup while he helped the Stars become relevant in Texas. It’s probably best that he moves on with the next stage of his life, although again, it’s almost his (and the NHL’s general managers’) call.

Avs unveil new third jerseys

Avs Jerseys

The Avalanche will be throwing a bunch of different looks at us this season.

Having already released specialized “Mile High” jerseys for February’s Stadium Series game, the Avs unveiled new third sweaters on Friday — less than 24 hours after a bitter 5-4 home loss to Minnesota in their season opener.

(Guess Colorado wanted to send out some good vibes after blowing a 4-1 third-period lead.)

While undoubtedly exciting for the organization, the release of these new thirds isn’t taking anybody by surprise. Last month, several websites published leaked images of Colorado’s and Anaheim’s third jerseys, so the design has been in the public eye for several weeks.

The Avs will debut these new thirds on Oct. 24, in a Saturday night tilt against Columbus.

Related: Roy explains why he didn’t call time out

Report: Escrow set at 16 percent

Gary Bettman, Donald Fehr
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Hey, remember in June when the NHLPA voted to keep the five-percent growth factor in spite of increasing worries about escrow?

Well, here’s why that decision was a significant one, via TSN’s Frank Seravalli:

With early revenue projections in place, the NHL and NHLPA set the escrow withholding rate for players at 16 per cent for the first quarter of the season on Thursday.

That means every player will have 16 per cent of earnings deducted from their paycheque and put aside until after all of this season’s hockey-related revenue is counted to ensure a perfect 50-50 revenue split with owners.

Now, this doesn’t mean that the players will definitely lose 16 percent of their salaries. Typically, they receive refunds when all the accounting is done.

Still, 16 percent is a good-sized chunk to withhold. They won’t be thrilled about it.

Related: To understand escrow, consider Duncan Keith