Should Sidney Crosby break his silence?

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During the last two weeks, the rumors about Pittsburgh Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby’s health have ramped up once again. In a way, it’s a bit like the Phoenix Coyotes situation in injury form: an important story with plenty of ups and downs but few concrete details, which can make the process frustrating for onlookers.

Joe addressed the latest round of scuttlebutt by asking everyone to relax, but many hockey people are struggling to deal with the murky nature of Crosby’s health situation. If their public comments are a true indication of their knowledge of the situation – rather than a smokescreen – then the Penguins organization seems like it’s just as confounded about their biggest star’s progress as anyone else.

Ultimately, the only answer to one of the off-season’s biggest (and most troubling) questions is a shoulder shrug. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review’s Dejan Kovacevic brings up an interesting point, then: doesn’t Crosby owe it to the Penguins – and to a far lesser extent, the hockey world – to keep his team more informed about his situation?

Look, I’m not suggesting that he reports to Pittsburgh and spends his entire summer under team supervision. He’s a grown man, an athlete is due his offseason, and the employer has no control over that. Nor am I suggesting Crosby isn’t due his privacy, particularly in light of his usual fishbowl existence. Nor am I ignoring that he’s had a rough few months. For all we know, it might still be rough for him.

But how about a call to the Penguins rather than vice versa?

How about a text?

Stick taps in Morse code?

The Penguins owe a lot to Crosby, but he surely owes them the courtesy of diligent, detailed updates on his health. To avoid doing so is as indefensible as it is inexplicable.

It’s a shame that the Penguins are less than a month from the start of camp, and Shero and Bylsma have so little information on the key component of their roster. It’s a shame that the public knows even less, not having heard from him since two days after last season ended.

It’s probably a little harsh to call Crosby’s lack of response “indefensible,” especially since it’s possible that he doesn’t know a whole lot more about his future than anyone else. Kovacevic does make an interesting point, though, and the very roots of the problem might come down to poor communication. At least that’s what Cassie McClellan argues in a provocative piece about Crosby’s situation; she believes that someone “looked the other way” when it came to his health after that initial David Steckel hit, whether it was the team’s staff, his teammates or Crosby himself.

And how about the ultimate scenario of everyone knowing everything? Crosby saying he’s okay, teammates – knowing that he’s not – going along with it, coaches – knowing that he’s not – are afraid to pull him, trainers – not saying too much because they don’t want to cause waves – letting it go, the GM – giving into pressures to keep the marquee player in the league in a marquee game – doesn’t say anything, and NHL officials in charge knowing what’s really going but taking everyone at face value. That’s not a conspiracy theory or anything; that’s just how these things can sometimes go. (I have a friend who’s an athletic trainer at the college level, and you’d be surprised just how willfully ignorant and/or flat-out in denial people can get around star players and their injuries.) If everyone knew, then everyone’s to blame.

At this point, it’s not about whose at fault for Crosby’s situation, but one can argue that the situation is still being handled in a way that seems strange to outsiders. Maybe the Penguins/Crosby are controlling information for tactical reasons, but the lack of concrete updates about the NHL’s biggest names lends itself to rumor mongering and doomsday proclamations. It’s doubtful that things would change much if Crosby shed some light on the situation, but Kovacevic is among those who believe that he should break his silence anyway.

(H/T to Kukla’s Korner.)

Video: Patrick Marleau scored a beauty in his Leafs debut

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It didn’t take Patrick Marleau long to score a goal for the Toronto Maple Leafs. Yea, it’s the preseason, but it’s still nice to see him adapt to his new surroundings.

Going into Tuesday’s game, the veteran admitted that a new beginning in a new city was exciting, but he didn’t seem stressed by it.

“I wouldn’t say nervous, but definitely some excitement,” Marleau told TSN.ca before the game.

“There’s that energy of something new … you’re not sure how everything’s going to go so you try to stay within yourself.”

He did a pretty good job staying within himself.

With the Leafs trailing 1-0 in the first period of their game against the Ottawa Senators, Marleau entered the Sens zone on the right side and roofed a wrist shot past Mike Condon.

 

“He scored a goal,” Leafs head coach Mike Babcock said, per Sportsnet. “He made a real nice play – he backchecked all the way, he slowed the guy down, he gave our D time, he pushed the pace, he wired it under the bar – I mean Patty was fine.”

Hockey world supports Brian Boyle in his battle against cancer

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On Tuesday, Brian Boyle announced that he had been diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia.

As scary as the news must have been for him to hear, Boyle showed the hockey world that he’s going to have a positive outlook on this situation.

“I feel very fortunate and very blessed,” Boyle said, per NHL.com. “We’ve had a tremendous outpouring of prayers, and if there’s anything I can ask it’s that that continues. That is something that I’ve seen firsthand heal cancers and heal situations that are said to be untreatable. For us, we’re in a good spot. We think we have a good plan of attack here and I’m looking forward to getting on the ice and playing.

Immediately, players, teams and fans began sending him messages of support. It’s incredible to see what the hockey community can do when it comes together.

Boyle has already stated that he plans on being in the Devils lineup on opening night.

Jaromir Jagr’s open to many things, but not retirement or a tryout

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Yes, Jaromir Jagr is 45-years-old. He’ll turn 46 in February.

So, yes, even for a fitness freak like Jagr, it’s likely that he’d probably not be the best fit for a team that plays at a frenetic pace. To get the most out of the living legend, a team would have to provide a nurturing environment. There are also questions about what sort of role he’d accept and how much money he’d settle for.

Even with all of those disclaimers under consideration, it’s maddening that we’re in late September and Jagr continues to put out semi-sarcastic cry for help videos.

So, what’s the latest on Jagr, then?

Well, to some extent, it’s useful to consider the process of elimination.

Sports-Express’ Igor Eronko reports that Jagr is open-minded about the KHL, though the NHL is first choice. Jagr acknowledged that participating in the 2018 Winter Olympics would be a draw in the process.

One thing he isn’t open to: a PTO with an NHL team.

While there’s actually some logic to a tryout – teams might want to see how well he can move/what kind of immediate chemistry Jagr could find – it does seem a little … demeaning to a first-ballot Hall of Famer who, frankly, is still producing solid numbers.

Eronko reports that Jagr said he’s talking to three-to-four teams, while Pierre LeBrun reports that two-to-three NHL teams are speaking with Jagr’s reps in the latest edition of TSN’s Insider Trading.

(Hey, both could be correct if Jagr’s including KHL suitors in his estimate.)

LeBrun also notes the idea Jagr is ruling out, beyond a PTO: retirement.

Jagr doesn’t want to hang up his skates, even if it means not playing in the NHL, which would bum out a slew of hockey fans (raises hand).

Naturally, there are creative “have your cake and eat it too” scenarios. Perhaps Jagr could sign a KHL contract with an NHL out clause of some kind, playing in the 2018 Winter Olympics, and then ink a deal with a contender who a) he wants to play for and b) is now convinced he still “has it?”

There are plenty of possibilities, and many of them are fun to think about.

Jagr needing to try out for a team – or worse, retire – is not so fun to think about.

Flyers experiment with Claude Giroux at LW, Sean Couturier as his center

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Last season, Claude Giroux and Sean Couturier were on the ice at the same time during even-strength situations for just a bit more than five minutes. Depending upon how a Philadelphia Flyers’ pre-season experiment goes, they could line up together a whole lot more often.

Of course, if you missed this post’s headline, you might be asking: “But how? They’re both centers.”

Well, under this experiment, Giroux would move to left wing, Couturier would play center, and Jakub Voracek would assume his familiar role at RW.

Giroux came into the NHL primarily as a right-winger before moving to center, so he’s clearly versatile enough to theoretically work out on a wing. It also might allow the Flyers to try to duplicate some of their mad science from the power play to even-strength, as that’s often the role he finds himself in on that locomotive of a man-advantage unit.

As Dave Isaac of the Courier-Post reports, Giroux doesn’t seem against it, really.

“It was actually a lot of fun,” Giroux said. “It’s not like I’m against it or I’m not happy with it. If it makes the team better, we have a lot of centermen and I’m up for it for sure.”

Giroux is right. The Flyers have a glut of pivots, especially if head coach Dave Hakstol views additions Nolan Patrick and Jori Lehtera (or fairly recent addition Valtteri Filppula) as better fits down the middle.

NHL.com’s Bill Meltzer reports that Hakstol is impressed by Giroux’s willingness to move around as need be.

“When your captain is as selfless as ‘G’ is, he [goes] all in,” Hakstol said. “Whatever the role is, he’s going to attack it… It’s early, but he’s had a very high-level camp.”

Giroux’s been, at times, a bit more dependent on the PP to get his numbers. In 2016-17, five of his 14 goals and 26 of his assists (31 of 58 points) came on the power play.

Perhaps Couturier could do the “dirty work” associated with a center while two gifted wingers exploit their chemistry and get to have the fun? It’s the sort of hypothesis that can make sense in a hockey laboratory, and it would be entertaining to see if it works out in reality.

Assuming such a scientific method even makes it to October.