Sidney Crosby

Should Sidney Crosby break his silence?

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During the last two weeks, the rumors about Pittsburgh Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby’s health have ramped up once again. In a way, it’s a bit like the Phoenix Coyotes situation in injury form: an important story with plenty of ups and downs but few concrete details, which can make the process frustrating for onlookers.

Joe addressed the latest round of scuttlebutt by asking everyone to relax, but many hockey people are struggling to deal with the murky nature of Crosby’s health situation. If their public comments are a true indication of their knowledge of the situation – rather than a smokescreen – then the Penguins organization seems like it’s just as confounded about their biggest star’s progress as anyone else.

Ultimately, the only answer to one of the off-season’s biggest (and most troubling) questions is a shoulder shrug. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review’s Dejan Kovacevic brings up an interesting point, then: doesn’t Crosby owe it to the Penguins – and to a far lesser extent, the hockey world – to keep his team more informed about his situation?

Look, I’m not suggesting that he reports to Pittsburgh and spends his entire summer under team supervision. He’s a grown man, an athlete is due his offseason, and the employer has no control over that. Nor am I suggesting Crosby isn’t due his privacy, particularly in light of his usual fishbowl existence. Nor am I ignoring that he’s had a rough few months. For all we know, it might still be rough for him.

But how about a call to the Penguins rather than vice versa?

How about a text?

Stick taps in Morse code?

The Penguins owe a lot to Crosby, but he surely owes them the courtesy of diligent, detailed updates on his health. To avoid doing so is as indefensible as it is inexplicable.

It’s a shame that the Penguins are less than a month from the start of camp, and Shero and Bylsma have so little information on the key component of their roster. It’s a shame that the public knows even less, not having heard from him since two days after last season ended.

It’s probably a little harsh to call Crosby’s lack of response “indefensible,” especially since it’s possible that he doesn’t know a whole lot more about his future than anyone else. Kovacevic does make an interesting point, though, and the very roots of the problem might come down to poor communication. At least that’s what Cassie McClellan argues in a provocative piece about Crosby’s situation; she believes that someone “looked the other way” when it came to his health after that initial David Steckel hit, whether it was the team’s staff, his teammates or Crosby himself.

And how about the ultimate scenario of everyone knowing everything? Crosby saying he’s okay, teammates – knowing that he’s not – going along with it, coaches – knowing that he’s not – are afraid to pull him, trainers – not saying too much because they don’t want to cause waves – letting it go, the GM – giving into pressures to keep the marquee player in the league in a marquee game – doesn’t say anything, and NHL officials in charge knowing what’s really going but taking everyone at face value. That’s not a conspiracy theory or anything; that’s just how these things can sometimes go. (I have a friend who’s an athletic trainer at the college level, and you’d be surprised just how willfully ignorant and/or flat-out in denial people can get around star players and their injuries.) If everyone knew, then everyone’s to blame.

At this point, it’s not about whose at fault for Crosby’s situation, but one can argue that the situation is still being handled in a way that seems strange to outsiders. Maybe the Penguins/Crosby are controlling information for tactical reasons, but the lack of concrete updates about the NHL’s biggest names lends itself to rumor mongering and doomsday proclamations. It’s doubtful that things would change much if Crosby shed some light on the situation, but Kovacevic is among those who believe that he should break his silence anyway.

(H/T to Kukla’s Korner.)

Oshie’s hat trick lets Caps just barely squeak by Penguins in OT

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What a start.

This series between the Pittsburgh Penguins and Washington Capitals might be headlined by Sidney Crosby and Alex Ovechkin, but as many have said in the lead-up to tonight’s opener, there is so much more to this second round matchup than that. Washington’s 4-3 overtime victory in Game 1 tonight could be offered up as Exhibit A.

This game had everything except big offensive showings from Crosby and Ovechkin. They had their moments, but in the end combined for just one assist.

What we got instead was a hat trick by T.J. Oshie that was completed with a game-winning goal that made it past the line by such a narrow margin that it warranted a video review:

This game also featured a sequence of three goals in 90 seconds and yet also some great saves by goaltenders Braden Holtby and Matt Murray. At the other end of the spectrum, there was a controversial hit by Tom Wilson that might lead to a suspension.

There was even some odd stuff. Like how Jay Beagle got a stick stuck in his equipment.

Twice:

If this game sets the tone for the rest of the series, then we should be in for a closely contested, highlight filled affair.

NOTES:

Nick Bonino had a goal and an assist for the Penguins. Evgeni Malkin and Ben Lovejoy accounted for the Penguins’ other markers.

— Capitals forward Andre Burakovsky scored the game’s opening goal. It was his first marker of the 2016 playoffs.

— Washington outshot Pittsburgh 15-9 in the first period, but Pittsburgh ended up with a 45-35 edge.

— This is the first time in the 2016 playoffs that Braden Holtby has allowed more than two goals. He surrendered just five goals in six games to Philadelphia.

— Matt Murray suffered his first career postseason loss after winning three straight contests against the New York Rangers.

Video: Wilson delivers late, knee-on-knee hit to Sheary

Wilson hit
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Tom Wilson has already found himself in a controversy for delivering a late, knee-on-knee hit to Penguins forward Conor Sheary in the third period of Game 1 Thursday night.

You can see that incident below:

Wilson spent two minutes in the sin bin earlier in the contest for crosschecking Evgeni Malkin, but there was no penalty on this play.

Fortunately Conor Sheary was able to stay in the game. The question now is if Wilson’s actions will lead to him being suspended prior to Game 2.

This isn’t Wilson’s first brush with controversy. He delivered a big hit to Brayden Schenn in 2013, but Wilson wasn’t suspended for that incident. Lubomir Visnovsky’s final campaign was cut short due to a check by Wilson that angered the New York Islanders. More recently, Nikita Zadorov was concussed by a crushing blow from the Capitals forward.

In 231 career regular season games, Wilson has 50 points and 486 penalty minutes.

Related: Wilson says ‘I’ve never been a dirty hitter’ after teams voice complaints

Video: Penguins, Caps combine for three goals in 90 seconds

Oshie goal
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For the first 30 minutes of Game 1 between Pittsburgh and Washington it looked like goaltenders Matt Murray and Braden Holtby might outshine these star-studded offenses. Then the floodgates opened up, if only for a moment.

Washington already had a 1-0 lead going into the second frame courtesy of Andre Burakovsky‘s first marker of the 2016 playoffs, but Ben Lovejoy and Evgeni Malkin scored back-to-back goals within the span of 57 seconds midway through the second period to tilt the scale in Pittsburgh’s favor. That lead didn’t last for long though as Capitals forward T.J. Oshie got a breakaway opportunity and took full advantage of it.

In total, there were three goals scored in the span of just 90 seconds and you can see all of them below:

After that sequence, the 2-2 tie held for the remainder of the frame. However, Oshie was able to reassert Washington’s edge just 3:23 minutes into the third period.

Video: Beagle gets stick stuck in visor

Beagle
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Through 40 minutes of action in Game 1 of the second round series between Pittsburgh and Washington and we’ve already seen some big moments, along with a pretty unusual one.

Beagle ended up with a stick lodged into his visor towards the end of the second frame. He tried to get it out himself, but ended up having to go to the bench for assistance. You can see that below: