Tomas Fleischmann

Dale Tallon raves about Tomas Fleischmann: He’s ‘going to be something special’

3 Comments

The Florida Panthers underwent an extreme makeover during this off-season, but it remains to be seen if the results will echo a cliched nerd-turned-babe transformation from teen dramas or if they’ll look like Mimi from the Drew Carey show. Whether the experiment turns out to be a success or a failure, let there be no doubt that the Panthers took plenty of wild gambles this summer.

One of the biggest ones involved handing former Washington Capitals and Colorado Avalanche winger Tomas Fleischmann a hefty four-year, $18 million contract.

The biggest risk of a summer full of risks?

If anything, that signing is the poster child for the Panthers off-season risks: a significant overpayment – something lesser teams occasionally need to do – with a less-understandably risky term for a player whose potential vastly outweighs his resume.

Aside from wildly injury prone defenseman Ed Jovanovski, Fleischmann poses the biggest injury risks of any newly signed player. He might even be a bigger risk in the eyes of some considering his struggles with blood clots (in his lungs) last season and that he also missed 11 games after dealing with deep vein thrombosis in 2009-10. The Panthers are confident that those worries are behind him – citing departed goalie Tomas Vokoun’s rebound from blood clots for one thing – but there’s no denying the worrisome reality that the Czech-born winger will spend the rest of his career on blood thinners.*

Despite those obvious worries, Panthers GM Dale Tallon is clearly tantalized by What Could Be. Fleischmann showed flashes of brilliance with the Capitals and then nearly produced a point per game rate in his brief time with the Avs (eight goals and 13 assists for 21 points in 22 games) before those blood clot issues shut his season down. Tallon named Fleischmann as the most exciting signing of a summer of reckless spending.

When asked which player he was most excited about signing this summer, Panthers general manager Dale Tallon’s eyes lit up as he pointed across the room.

“Tomas Fleischmann,” Tallon said with a smile, “is going to be something special.”

Snarky aside: I wonder if Tallon’s eyes will light up when he provides injury report updates next season? Anyway, moving on …

After missing so much time last season — Fleischmann had averaged 72 games over the previous three seasons before appearing in just 45 last year — Fleischmann said he cannot wait to jump back onto the ice. Fleischmann is going to be asked to carry a big part of the Panthers’ offensive load, but he said with talented forwards such as Booth, Stephen Weiss, Scottie Upshall and Kris Versteeg around him, he doesn’t think he’s going to be overburdened.

“He hasn’t reached his peak yet,” Tallon said, “and his numbers are just going to go up. He’s a very skilled guy who makes other players better. With [defenseman] Brian Campbell on the back end, he’ll score or make plays if they focus on [Fleischmann]. We have a lot more weapons, a lot more options on this team than we’ve had in the past.”

The Panthers will need his scoring to progress next season

I have some serious reservations about calling the Panthers a vastly improved team because their defense – while more explosive – might be just as leaky as last season and they faced a dramatic drop in goaltending talent from Vokoun to Jose Theodore. But even if it’s by sheer numbers, the Panthers’ offense should be far more dangerous. Campbell gets a lot of flack for his absurd contract, but he’s a legitimate offensive talent who should be a serious catalyst for scoring chances (especially since he should receive the top power play time in Florida after Duncan Keith took those top minutes in Chicago).

The ultimate question is if they’ll be able to score enough to mask their problems in their own end. The Panthers would require a lot of positive reactions to a lot of “if” scenarios and Fleischmann ranks as possibly the biggest wild card of them all. If nothing else, the Panthers will have one thing they severely lacked during the last few seasons: intrigue.

* – Let’s hope that paragraph is the most depressing one that appears in PHT today.

(H/T to Rotoworld.)

Report: Gaborik (foot) to miss eight weeks

TORONTO, ON - SEPTEMBER 17: Marian Gaborik #12 of Team Europe celebrates his first period goal against Team USA during the World Cup of Hockey tournament at the Air Canada Centre on September 17, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
Getty
2 Comments

Update: Yikes, the Los Angeles Kings announced that Marian Gaborik will be sidelined for eight weeks with a foot injury, according to the Los Angeles Times’ Helene Elliott.

***

Some bad news for Team Europe and the Los Angeles Kings — Marian Gaborik, who was seen this morning on crutches, is reportedly out of the World Cup of Hockey final and may miss the beginning of the NHL campaign as well.

The news, first reported by Sportsnet, comes after Gaborik played 17:58 in Europe’s shock semifinal win over Sweden, scoring his team’s opening goal.

Gaborik took a puck to the foot during the second period, yet managed to finish the game.

The veteran Slovak had enjoyed a good tournament prior to getting hurt, scoring a pair of goals while getting healthy doses of ice time, including nearly 19 in a win over the Czechs in the group stage.

With Gaborik out, Mikkel Boedker will (presumably) make his tournament debut. Boedker has been a healthy scratch for the Europeans thus far, though it’s possible he could continue to sit if head coach Ralph Krueger elects to dress seven defensemen — Luca Sbisa would get the call — rather than plug in another forward.

As for the ramifications for L.A… well, this could be tough. Gaborik, signed through 2021 at $4.875M per, only scored 12 goals and 22 points in 54 games last season — missing extensive time with a lingering knee injury — and the Kings were hopeful he was in line for a bounce-back campaign, especially given how good he looked at the World Cup.

Sportsnet reports Gaborik is headed back to Los Angeles today.

‘Never say never,’ but Krueger’s commitment is to Southampton, not to making an NHL return

Southampton v Bayer Leverkusen - Pre Season Friendly
Getty
Leave a comment

Ralph Krueger spent one lockout-shortened season in charge of the Edmonton Oilers, before he was unceremoniously fired (via Skype) to make way for the hiring of Dallas Eakins.

But Krueger’s success at the World Cup, leading Team Europe into the best-of-three final against Team Canada, has a lot of people wondering if he might one day make an NHL return.

Krueger’s current full-time job is a big one — he’s chairman of Southampton Football Club in the English Premier League.

Suffice to say, it’s not a job one just leaves for anything.

“I came in here committed completely to Southampton Football Club and the future of that organization in my role,” Krueger said Sunday. “You can never say never, but at the moment I’m very proud to be back in hockey at this level and to be competing. We are just having so much fun in our room, the coaches, the players, the whole group is enjoying it, and I am, too. But my real life is my commitment to Southampton Football Club at the moment.”

Kreuger repeated his “never say never” line today, so it sounds like he’s at least open to the possibility. However, he insisted that he didn’t take the World Cup job with the goal of getting another job in hockey.

Related: Southampton smokes West Ham in London

Byfuglien ‘didn’t enjoy’ his World Cup experience

TORONTO, ON - SEPTEMBER 15:  Dustin Byfuglien #33 of Team USA answers questions during Media day at the World Cup of Hockey 2016 at Air Canada Centre on September 15, 2016 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  (Photo by Minas Panagiotakis/Getty Images)
Getty
Leave a comment

It’s getting harder and harder to find positives in the aftermath of Team USA’s poor performance at the World Cup of Hockey.

On Monday, Winnipeg d-man Dustin Byfuglien weighed in on his time at the tourney, telling Sportsnet it wasn’t much fun.

“The experience and everything that went on, it is what it is,” Byfuglien said. “You know, I didn’t enjoy it.”

That revelation is hardly a surprise. Head coach John Tortorella made Byfuglien a healthy scratch for the tournament opener against Europe — a dismal 3-0 loss — then played Big Buff just 10:50 in a 4-2 defeat to Canada.

Byfuglien did get a healthy chunk of ice time in America’s final game — 21:18 in a loss to the Czechs — but by that point, the damage was done.

It was clear early on the Byfuglien experiment had its problems.

Named to the U.S. national team for the first time in his career, he was platooned between forward and defense in the exhibition games leading up to the tournament, even though he’d previously stated he much prefers playing defense.

“It’s definitely not my favorite spot,” Byfuglien said after playing up front in a pre-tourney win over Finland. “It’s just something they wanted to try and that was it.”

Not long after the Finland game, Big Buff was out of the lineup. And Tortorella’s reasoning behind the move wasn’t very clear.

“As we went through our lineup and the situations that we may get involved with — power play, penalty killing and all that — we felt this was our lineup to start the tournament,” he explained.

The lack of explanation only further confused the issue. Parking Byfuglien was a bizarre decision to begin with, especially in light of America’s offensive woes at the tournament — a versatile weapon on the power play, Byfuglien was the highest-scoring U.S. defenseman in the NHL last season.

In the end, this situation only underscores the problems that plagued Team USA throughout the tourney. Roster and lineup decisions constantly came under scrutiny and, in the end, nobody had anything positive to say about the end result.

But at least there was one good memory…

What about the Red Wings for Trouba?

SAN JOSE, CA - MARCH 27:  Jacob Trouba #8 of the Winnipeg Jets in action against the San Jose Sharks at SAP Center on March 27, 2014 in San Jose, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
Getty
1 Comment

Earlier today, PHT writer Adam Gretz made compelling cases for the Ducks, Bruins, Rangers, and Avalanche to take a run at Winnipeg defenseman Jacob Trouba.

But allow me to add one more team to the potential mix — the Detroit Red Wings, who could really use a 22-year-old, right-shot defenseman who skates well and has good offensive instincts.

The Wings also have a surplus of forwards to work with. While Dylan Larkin is probably untouchable, Gustav Nyquist and Tomas Tatar probably aren’t. Or perhaps a youngster like Andreas Athanasiou or Anthony Mantha would interest the Jets.

The question the Wings may run into, should they make a push for Trouba, is whether they’d be willing to part with Danny DeKeyser. The 26-year-old defenseman just signed a six-year contract extension, and there’s reason to believe the Jets may look for a youngish, left-shot d-man in return for Trouba.

That’s pure speculation, for the record. DeKeyser is an important part of the Wings. He’s a Michigan native and he comes with a fairly reasonable, $5 million cap hit. However, it’s worth noting that, according to General Fanager, his no-trade clause doesn’t kick in until next summer.

At the very least, Ken Holland should be in touch with Kevin Cheveldayoff, if only to gauge the price for Trouba. The Red Wings’ GM said over the summer that he may look to trade for a defenseman around training-camp time, which happens to be right now.

“Part of this might be let’s get to September and see,” Holland said. “I’m hoping we’ve got 15, 16 NHL forwards and we’re positioned to do a deal.”